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Clinton to deliver major economic speech in New York Monday

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Hillary Clinton will deliver a major economic speech Monday at the New School in New York, outlining several proposals her campaign plans to unveil in more detail down the road, according to media reports.
 
At the center of her policy vision is a call to boost the stagnating incomes of middle-class families, which has been a core Democratic tenet for several years.
 
The speech is the product of scores of conversations with elite thinkers of the liberal policy establishment, such as former White House advisor Gene Sperling, Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz, liberal think tank president Neera Tanden, economist Alan Blinder and Jared Bernstein, former senior economic adviser to Vice President Joe Biden.
 
{mosads}Clinton will push for the creation of an infrastructure bank to spur public and private investment, paid family medical leave, increasing the minimum wage, greater corporate profit sharing, small business tax relief, federal subsidies for college and raising taxes on the nation’s wealthiest earners.
 
She will also focus on income inequality and what she’s referred as distorted incentives in corporate America that motivate executives to focus on maximizing short-term profit instead of long-term growth.
 
Much like Obama has done over the past six years, Clinton will emphasize investment in education and new sectors such as renewable energy as the path to future economic prosperity, instead of quick fixes like cutting taxes and wiping out regulations.
 
She will also push back against Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush’s pledge to return the domestic economy to 4 percent growth without providing a detailed policy roadmap for how to get there.
 
She will praise the economic records of Obama and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, and contrast them to the economic plunge that began during former President George W. Bush’s final year in office.
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