What to watch for on Day 2 at the GOP convention

What to watch for on Day 2 at the GOP convention
© Getty Images

Republicans will officially nominate Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump nominates ambassador to Turkey Trump heads to Mar-a-Lago after signing bill to avert shutdown CNN, MSNBC to air ad turned down by Fox over Nazi imagery MORE for president on Tuesday.

Unity will be a major theme as the party seeks to put forth Trump as its standard bearer a day after Never Trump forces were all but vanquished. 

And a bevy of speakers is set to lay into the Obama administration’s handling of the economy, the theme of the convention's second day.

ADVERTISEMENT

Here’s what to watch for when the convention gavels back in Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. EDT. 

Party leaders take center stage

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGreen New Deal Resolution invites big picture governing ‘Contingency’ spending in 3B budget deal comes under fire Coulter defends Paul Ryan: This is 100 percent Trump's fault MORE (Ky.), House Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanUnscripted Trump keeps audience guessing in Rose Garden Coulter defends Paul Ryan: This is 100 percent Trump's fault The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Trump escalates border fight with emergency declaration MORE (Wis.) and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (Calif.) are all scheduled to speak in a broad show of support for the party’s unconventional nominee.

It could be McConnell’s most high-profile defense of Trump. Although the longtime senator has endorsed the presumptive nominee, he’s shied away from answering questions about Trump's campaign and recently questioned the candidate's credibility.

Ryan’s speech will come one day after he branded Trump a conservative, but “not my kind of conservative.”

While he hasn’t shied away from criticizing Trump on occasion, he’s often framed the election as a “binary choice.”

McCarthy will speak not just as a House leader, but also as a California delegate selected by Trump’s campaign. 

Dollars and cents 

Tuesday’s theme is another play off of Trump’s campaign slogan. “Make America Work Again” will be a night devoted to hammering home how Trump’s successful business career makes him the best fit to lead the country’s economy. 

Kerry Woolard, general manager of Trump Winery, and Donald Trump Jr., an executive vice president at The Trump Organization, will speak for Trump. 

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson will also take to the stage to drive the economic message home.

And Tuesday’s speeches will help answer a question perplexing delegates and the media alike: Who is Andy Wist? 

Wist, who owns a restoration and waterproofing company based out of New York, has little public presence or political involvement, so his inclusion on the Tuesday list of speakers surprised many. His presence in the New York real estate scene suggests that Wist worked with Trump at one point during the candidate's real estate career, but he hasn’t publicly commented on his role. 

Christie and Carson

Tuesday will also bring speeches from two former Trump presidential rivals turned allies, Ben Carson and Chris Christie, both of whom criticized Trump during the primary. 

Christie’s speech will be especially noteworthy because it’s his first major speech in support of Trump since he was passed over for the vice presidential spot.  

Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP braces for Trump's emergency declaration GOP wants to pit Ocasio-Cortez against Democrats in the Senate USCIS child marriage report: Laws that do not value girls are baked into our system MORE stands alone 

Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson stands alone as the only vulnerable Republican senator scheduled to deliver a speech on the convention stage, as many in his position look to keep space between themselves and Donald Trump.

Politically vulnerable Republican Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMark Kelly's campaign raises over M in days after launching Senate bid The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Lawmakers wait for Trump's next move on border deal Mark Kelly launches Senate bid in Arizona MORE (Ariz.), Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteUS, allies must stand in united opposition to Iran’s bad behavior American military superiority will fade without bold national action Five possible successors to Mattis MORE (N.H.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOn The Money: Trump declares emergency at border | Braces for legal fight | Move divides GOP | Trump signs border deal to avoid shutdown | Winners, losers from spending fight | US, China trade talks to resume next week Trump declares national emergency at border Democrats veer left as Trump cements hold on Republicans MORE (Fla.) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulBusiness, conservative groups slam Trump’s national emergency declaration The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Trump escalates border fight with emergency declaration On The Money: Trump declares emergency at border | Braces for legal fight | Move divides GOP | Trump signs border deal to avoid shutdown | Winners, losers from spending fight | US, China trade talks to resume next week MORE (Ky.), all caught up in their own primary races, are steering clear of the convention. Even Ohio Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanSteel lobby's PR blitz can't paper over damaging effects of tariffs Trade official warns senators of obstacles to quick China deal Lawmakers divided over how to end shutdowns for good MORE won’t give a prime-time speech, despite the event taking place in his home state. 

The move is a reversal for Johnson, who told The Associated Press last week that he would skip the convention because he wanted "to spend as much time in Wisconsin as possible” as he prepares for a fight against former Sen. Russ Feingold (D).

By accepting the high-profile role, Johnson will likely try to play to the GOP base and help boost his own turnout in the swing state.

Recent polls show Johnson behind Feingold.

Tiffany Trump goes prime-time

At this point, America is on a first-name basis with the majority of Trump’s adult children — Ivanka, Eric and Donald Jr. 

On Tuesday night, 22-year-old Tiffany Trump gets her national-stage debut. 

Tiffany is Trump’s daughter with his second wife, Marla Maples. She spent some time on the campaign trail during her father’s swing through Pennsylvania, but nowhere near as much time as the three elder Trumps. 

She’s best known for her popular Instagram profile, as well as for a 2011 pop single she released, so the convention speech marks her first major foray into Republican politics, as well as her highest-profile appearance.  

Celebrities for Trump 

Trump promised a convention filled with pizzazz, and although the speaker list didn’t include many of the marquee names many had hoped for, Tuesday will include a handful of celebrities. 

Dana White, the president of Ultimate Fighting Championship, will take to the podium to tout Trump.

White’s convention bio specifically notes that Trump hosted a fight at one of his New Jersey properties for the controversial mixed-martial art in the sport’s early years. While it’s blossomed into a major industry, many were concerned about the sport’s level of violence during its infancy. 

Natalie Gulbis, a professional golfer and occasional golf partner of Trump’s will also speak. She’s unabashedly pro-Trump, having written a blog post titled “The Donald Trump I Know,” where she lauded the GOP nominee as “gracious, generous and inspiring.” 

Soap opera star Kimberlin Brown is also scheduled to speak; she’s best known for her roles in "The Young and the Restless" and "The Bold and the Beautiful."