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Federal judge blocks motion in Colorado electors' lawsuit

Federal judge blocks motion in Colorado electors' lawsuit
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A federal judge in Colorado denied on Monday a motion from two electors who want to avoid voting for the presidential candidate who won the state's popular vote in an effort to keep Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpFox News president, top anchors advised to quarantine after coronavirus exposure: report Six notable moments from Trump and Biden's '60 Minutes' interviews Biden on attacks on mental fitness: Trump thought '9/11 attack was 7/11 attack' MORE out of the White House. 

According to ABC 7 Denver, Judge Wiley Daniel said granting the injunction to allow electors to vote in the Electoral College out of sync with the popular vote would "undermine" the electoral process. 

He advised the plaintiffs to try to change state law if they were unhappy with how the election shook out.  

Though Daniel rejected the request for a preliminary injunction, the lawsuit — which challenges a state law requiring electors to vote for the winner of the state’s popular vote — is still pending in federal court. 

Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHarris lists out 'racist' actions by Trump in '60 minutes' interview: 'It all speaks for itself' Trump has list of top intelligence officials he'll fire if he wins reelection: report Clinton says most Republicans want to see Trump gone but can't say it publicly: report MORE won Colorado’s Electoral College votes on Nov. 8. But depending on the result of the lawsuit, similar laws in 28 other states — including several in which Trump won the popular vote — could be in jeopardy.

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The two Democratic electors hope to persuade Republican electors in other states to vote for a third-party candidate to keep Trump from receiving the necessary 270 votes. 

Trump's lawyer, in a filing to the court, wrote Monday that the lawsuit threatened to "undermine" the results of the election. 

“Of course, President-elect Donald Trump and Vice President-elect Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceSix notable moments from Trump and Biden's '60 Minutes' interviews Pence's 'body man' among aides who tested positive for coronavirus: report Biden: Meadows coronavirus remark a 'candid acknowledgement' of Trump strategy 'to wave the white flag' MORE have more than enough electoral votes to secure their respective offices,” wrote attorney Christopher Murray in a filing submitted to the court, as reported by Politico.

“Plaintiffs’ lawsuit, however, threatens to undermine the many laws in other states that sensibly bind their electors’ votes to represent the will of the citizens, undermining the Electoral College in the process. That is why the President-elect and his Campaign seek to intervene in this case.”