Federal judge blocks motion in Colorado electors' lawsuit

Federal judge blocks motion in Colorado electors' lawsuit
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A federal judge in Colorado denied on Monday a motion from two electors who want to avoid voting for the presidential candidate who won the state's popular vote in an effort to keep Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump calls for Republicans to be 'united' on abortion Tlaib calls on Amash to join impeachment resolution Facebook temporarily suspended conservative commentator Candace Owens MORE out of the White House. 

According to ABC 7 Denver, Judge Wiley Daniel said granting the injunction to allow electors to vote in the Electoral College out of sync with the popular vote would "undermine" the electoral process. 

He advised the plaintiffs to try to change state law if they were unhappy with how the election shook out.  

Though Daniel rejected the request for a preliminary injunction, the lawsuit — which challenges a state law requiring electors to vote for the winner of the state’s popular vote — is still pending in federal court. 

Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWarren policy ideas show signs of paying off Biden at campaign kickoff event: I don't have to be 'angry' to win Top Dem: Trump helps GOP erase enthusiasm gap; Ohio a big problem MORE won Colorado’s Electoral College votes on Nov. 8. But depending on the result of the lawsuit, similar laws in 28 other states — including several in which Trump won the popular vote — could be in jeopardy.

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The two Democratic electors hope to persuade Republican electors in other states to vote for a third-party candidate to keep Trump from receiving the necessary 270 votes. 

Trump's lawyer, in a filing to the court, wrote Monday that the lawsuit threatened to "undermine" the results of the election. 

“Of course, President-elect Donald Trump and Vice President-elect Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceDozens of graduates walk out in protest of Pence address Trudeau on tariff deal: Canadian and US businesses can get back to 'working constructively together' Congress has a duty to go through with the impeachment and public trial of President Trump MORE have more than enough electoral votes to secure their respective offices,” wrote attorney Christopher Murray in a filing submitted to the court, as reported by Politico.

“Plaintiffs’ lawsuit, however, threatens to undermine the many laws in other states that sensibly bind their electors’ votes to represent the will of the citizens, undermining the Electoral College in the process. That is why the President-elect and his Campaign seek to intervene in this case.”