Poll: Dems favor Biden, Sanders for 2020 nomination

Poll: Dems favor Biden, Sanders for 2020 nomination
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Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump hails Arizona Senate for audit at Phoenix rally, slams governor Republicans focus tax hike opposition on capital gains change Biden on hecklers: 'This is not a Trump rally. Let 'em holler' MORE and Bernie SandersBernie SandersPoll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Overnight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia US launches second Somalia strike in week MORE lead the field of potential Democratic presidential nominees in 2020, a Public Policy Polling (PPP) survey released Tuesday shows. 

When Democratic voters are asked to pick from a field of nine Democratic candidates, 31 percent pick the vice president and 24 percent favor the Vermont senator to be the Democratic nominee.

On the other hand, the PPP survey also found that Democratic voters want a younger candidate who hasn't run for president before. Sanders and Biden are both in their 70s and have run for the White House before. 

Another 16 percent of poll respondents said they would vote for Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenKavanaugh conspiracy? Demands to reopen investigation ignore both facts and the law Biden signals tough stance on tech with antitrust picks Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary MORE (D-Mass.) if she ran, while 14 percent were undecided. 

Other candidates mentioned have low support.

Only 4 percent of those surveyed said they would vote for New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, while 2 percent each said they would pick Ohio Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownSunday shows preview: Bipartisan infrastructure talks drag on; Democrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probe White House on Cleveland Indians' name change: 'We certainly support their change of name' Key Biden ally OK with dropping transit from infrastructure package MORE, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro. 

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Meanwhile, Minnesota Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenAl Franken to launch 15-stop comedy tour Democrats, GOP face crowded primaries as party leaders lose control Gillibrand: 'I definitely want to run for president again' MORE and New York Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandEquilibrium/ Sustainability — Presented by NextEra Energy — Clean power repurposes dirty power Senators hail 'historic changes' as competing proposals to tackle military sexual assault advance Overnight Defense: Military justice overhaul included in defense bill | Pentagon watchdog to review security of 'nuclear football' | Pentagon carries out first air strike in Somalia under Biden MORE received 3 percent support each for the nomination.

With the 2020 election nearly four years away, early polls generally only show which candidates have the strongest name recognition, which would explain while Biden, Sanders and Warren are emerging as top picks for Democratic voters. 

PPP notes that Booker, Cuomo, Castro, Brown and Gillibrand all have less than 50 percent name recognition with Democrats nationally. 

In 2012, polls gave Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioBipartisan congressional commission urges IOC to postpone, relocate Beijing Games Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill to hold platforms accountable for misinformation during health crises | Website outages hit Olympics, Amazon and major banks Senators introduce bipartisan bill to secure critical groups against hackers MORE (R-Fla.) and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) large advantages, though they both ended their presidential bids early in the year. 

However, polls also showed Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden flexes presidential muscle on campaign trail with Virginia's McAuliffe Shontel Brown gaining ground against Nina Turner in Ohio: poll Biden hits trail for McAuliffe in test of his political brand MORE dominating the field of prospective Democratic candidates, which she won despite a strong challenge from Sanders. 

Fifty-seven percent of Democrats polled said they want their candidate to be under the age of 60, and 77 percent said they want their candidate to be younger than 70. 

Biden and Sanders are 74 and 75, respectively. 

Only 25 percent of Democrats said they want their candidate to be someone who has run for president before, while 41 prefer someone who hasn't, and 34 percent said they are not sure one way or the other. 

“There’s a tension for Democrats nationally,” said Dean Debnam, president of Public Policy Polling. “They want new blood, but their most well known and popular figures don’t exactly fit that mold. Of course they have a long time to get that all figured out.” 

The poll surveyed 400 Democratic primary voters on Dec. 6 and 7, and has a margin of error of 4.9 percentage points.