Clinton: Lack of respect from Sanders and his supporters 'hurt'

Clinton: Lack of respect from Sanders and his supporters 'hurt'
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Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe dangerous erosion of Democratic Party foundations The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Democrats see victory in a voting rights defeat Left laughs off floated changes to 2024 ticket MORE says that Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDemocrats calls on Biden administration to ease entry to US for at-risk Afghans Briahna Joy Gray: Last-minute push for voting legislation felt 'perfomative' Biden stiff arms progressives on the Postal Service MORE's (I-Vt.) reluctance to concede the Democratic presidential nomination to her was hurtful and "disrespectful."

In an interview on the podcast "Pod Save America," Clinton recalled how Sanders "just kept going" during the Democratic primaries, despite the fact that she had emerged "by March and April" as the clear nominee. 

“I had such a different experience in '08,” she said, referring to her 2008 race against then-candidate Barack Obama. “Once it was over, it was over. And I quickly endorsed President ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaJudge denies Trump spokesman's effort to force Jan. 6 committee to return financial records Gina McCarthy: Why I'm more optimistic than ever on tackling the climate crisis The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden talks, Senate balks MORE. I worked really hard to get him elected.

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“I didn’t get anything like that respect from Sanders and his supporters," she added. "And it hurt, you know, to have basically captured the nomination, ending up with more than 4 million votes than he had. And he dragged it out.”

Clinton went on "Pod Save America," a political talk show run by former Obama staffers, to promote her campaign memoir. Clinton's new book, "What Happened," was released on Tuesday.

Sanders eventually conceded the nomination to Clinton and endorsed her two weeks before the start of the Democratic National Convention.

Clinton attributed Sanders's decision to continue his campaign against her to the fact that he's not a Democrat. 

"Why would we be surprised? He’s not a Democrat,” she said. “And that’s not a slam on him — that is just a repetition of what he says about himself.”

Sanders has described himself as a democratic socialist, though he caucuses with the Democrats in the Senate.

In her book, Clinton argues that Sanders's attacks against her during the primaries caused lasting damage to her campaign and made it harder for her to win over his supporters for the general election.