Breitbart charts path for 2018 midterm races

Roy Moore’s insurgent victory in the Republican primary for a Senate seat in Alabama has Breitbart News and chairman Stephen Bannon expanding their target list in 2018, Breitbart Editor-in-Chief Alex Marlow told The Hill in a Wednesday interview.

Breitbart was squarely behind Moore in that contest, with Bannon acting as a campaign surrogate and speaking at Moore’s rallies and victory party. 

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There is an urgency at Breitbart to capitalize on the grassroots energy that propelled Moore past incumbent Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeDomestic influence campaigns borrow from Russia’s playbook Overnight Defense: Senate bucks Trump with Yemen war vote, resolution calling crown prince 'responsible' for Khashoggi killing | House briefing on Saudi Arabia fails to move needle | Inhofe casts doubt on Space Force Five things to watch in Mississippi Senate race MORE (R-Ala.) in a race that is being hailed on the right as a watershed moment in the fight against the GOP establishment.

“I think a lot of people’s greatest fears about this movement and how powerful it is were confirmed yesterday,” Marlow said.

“We see this race in Alabama as a confirmation of our values. We’re in the early stages of a process in which we’re seeing the Republican establishment lose influence and power despite their vast coffers of money. That’s a trend that I think will continue. I think the establishment sees the writing on the wall.”

Moore’s victory was a blow to President Trump, who endorsed the incumbent. It was a bigger loss for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Shutdown Day 25 | Dems reject White House invite for talks | Leaders nix recess with no deal | McConnell blocks second House Dem funding bill | IRS workers called back for tax-filing season | Senate bucks Trump on Russia sanctions Mellman: Why does the GOP persist? Leaders nix recess with no shutdown deal in sight MORE (R-Ky.), whose allied super PAC burned through millions of dollars, only to see their candidate lose by nearly 10 points.

Now, Breitbart and Bannon will turn their attention to election fights in nearly a dozen other states, including Nevada, Arizona, Tennessee, Mississippi, Utah, West Virginia, Nebraska, Montana and Wisconsin.

Bannon has met personally with Danny Tarkanian, who is challenging Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerTrump’s shifting Cabinet to introduce new faces Trump's most memorable insults and nicknames of 2018 Progressive strategist says changing demographics will help Dems MORE (R) in Nevada, and Tea Party favorite Chris McDaniel, who is mulling a challenge against Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerMobile providers at center of privacy storm The Memo: Trump moves to brink of emergency declaration ‘Prosper Africa’ and Trump's opportunity during great power competition MORE (R) in Mississippi. He has also been in contact with Kelli Ward’s campaign in Arizona, where Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump eyes wall money options as shutdown hits 21 days Poll: Sanders most popular senator, Flake least CBS News in talks to hire Flake: report MORE (R) is a top target.

A source familiar with Bannon's plans told The Hill that he is “all in” for West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey (R), who is running in the Senate primary race against Rep. Evan Jenkins (R) for the right to take on Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinLeaders nix recess with no shutdown deal in sight EPA's Wheeler faces grilling over rule rollbacks The Hill's Morning Report — No new negotiations as shutdown hits 25 days MORE (D-W.V.).


And Bannon is intent on recruiting a primary challenge against Sen. Deb FischerDebra (Deb) Strobel FischerErnst elected to Senate GOP leadership This week: Congress starts lame-duck with leadership fight Senate GOP readies for leadership reshuffle MORE (R-Neb.), a sign that no Republican incumbent is safe.

Bannon’s allies were already seeking a primary challenger for Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerThe Memo: Romney moves stir worries in Trump World Senate GOP names first female members to Judiciary panel Former US special envoy to anti-ISIS coalition joins Stanford University as lecturer MORE (R-Tenn.) before he announced on Tuesday that he would not seek reelection.

“I think Corker backing out sends a strong signal that there are going to be people who say it’s just not worth the fight,” Marlow said.

In Utah, conservatives will be looking for someone to challenge either Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchLive coverage: Trump AG pick grilled on Mueller probe at confirmation hearing Trump praises RNC chairwoman after she criticizes her uncle Mitt Romney Romney sworn in as senator MORE (R-Utah), if he seeks reelection, or 2012 GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney, who could jump into the race if Hatch retires.

And there will be plenty of opportunities for Breitbart to get behind “populist-nationalist” candidates in states where Democrats are defending seats.

While he was still White House chief strategist, Bannon met with Montana state auditor Matt Rosendale (R), who is challenging Sen. Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterSome Senate Dems see Ocasio-Cortez as weak spokeswoman for party Three GOP Senate candidates, NRA may have illegally coordinated ads: report Immigration is pressure point for both sides in shutdown showdown MORE (D). Bannon has also met with Wisconsin state Sen. Leah Vukmir (R), who is challenging Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne Baldwin116th Congress breaks records for women, minority lawmakers Kyrsten Sinema swears in to Congress using copy of Constitution instead of religious book Dems say Trump is defying court order by pushing abstinence programs MORE (D).

Sources stressed that no decisions have been made about backing either candidate, but the growing map is evidence of the scope of Breitbart’s political ambitions.

“You can bet this movement will be invigorated to aggressively pursue populist-nationalist conservatives that will run in primaries,” Marlow said. “I think in most of these instances, these are the types of people that will be nominated by the Republican Party.”

In those states and more, Bannon and Breitbart will be looking to replicate Moore’s Alabama victory, which saw a coalition of conservatives arrive as Moore’s ground troops during the campaign’s final weeks.

In addition to Bannon, 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin campaigned for Moore, as did former Breitbart editor and Trump aide Sebastian Gorka. There is an expectation that Palin will be more active politically in 2018 than she was during the last campaign cycle.

“Get ready for the return of Sarah Palin,” Andy Surabian, who acted as Bannon’s political adviser in the White House, told The Hill. “She will be at the forefront in the coming war with the establishment for the heart and soul of the Republican Party. Few people have more sway with Republican voters than she does.”

Surabian, who remains in close contact with Bannon, is now advising the pro-Trump outside group Great America Alliance, which coordinated rallies and ran ads for Moore.

Moore also got an assist from former U.K. Independence Party leader Nigel Farage, one of the architects of the British referendum to leave the European Union, and the House Freedom Caucus, with an endorsement from Chairman Mark Meadows (R-N.C.). Meadows political adviser Wayne King was on the ground in Alabama, as was Rep. Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertThe Memo: Trump veers between hard-liner, dealmaker on shutdown Gohmert to 'Fox & Friends': Extend shutdown for wall 'until hell freezes over' DHS secretary: Mary and Joseph would have been eligible for asylum MORE (R-Texas), another Freedom Caucus member.

Some in Bannon’s orbit are calling this confluence of forces a new “media-political nexus” that they believe will be a force in 2018.

“There’s a lot of synergy happening in the anti-establishment movement right now,” Marlow said. “People are in sync.”

Trump, meanwhile, was notably out of sync with his supporters in the Alabama race, backing Strange even as all of the energy on the right coalesced behind Moore. 

To many on the right, it was the latest example of Trump losing touch with the grass-roots base that propelled his outsider campaign.

“He may have lost touch with his base to a certain degree,” Marlow said. “But the base has not lost the connection with the values that Trump advocated on the campaign trail.”

There is a concern on the right that White House chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE has choked off the president’s access to Breitbart News and other conservative outlets that once fed his instincts. Marlow described Kelly as a “standup American of peerless character” but said reports of Kelly’s tighter grip on Trump’s news consumption is a “major concern.”

“If the stories are true, that he’s not getting this information, then I think it’s detrimental to the president, because the biggest advantage the president has is that he has better political instincts than anyone in the country,” Marlow said. “If he’s not allowed to have full information, how is he supposed to be able to use those instincts and assess the information and come to these conclusions that he comes to where he’s been vindicated time and again?”

Still, Marlow stressed that the nationalist-populist movement espoused by Breitbart could flourish even without Trump.

“It’s about values and ideas,” he said. “It’s not a cult of personality.”

Ben Kamisar contributed to this report