GOP strategist donates to Alabama Democrat

GOP strategist donates to Alabama Democrat
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A former strategist for Gov. John Kasich (R-Ohio) and Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainAnother recession could hit US in 2019, says credit union association chief R-E-S-P-E-C-T: One legacy of Franklin and McCain is up to us To cure Congress, elect more former military members MORE’s (R-Ariz.) 2008 presidential campaign said Wednesday that he donated to Alabama Democratic Senate nominee Doug Jones.

“Proud to join my fellow true GOP warriors @MarkSalter55 @murphymike @MattSDavid @Timodc in donating to @GDouglasJones for U.S. Senate. We're doing this to put America first, but also to save the GOP. Doug Jones is an honorable man & will be a good Senator. #CountryOverParty,” John Weaver wrote on Twitter, referencing several other prominent Republican strategists.

Weaver confirmed to The Hill that he donated $500 to Jones’s campaign. Tim Miller, one of the strategists mentioned in Weaver’s tweet, announced last month in a blog post that he donated to the Alabama Democrat.

Weaver’s tweet comes one day after Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeGrassley agrees to second Kavanaugh hearing after GOP members revolt Murkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify Kavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday MORE (R-Ariz.), a staunch critic of President TrumpDonald John TrumpOver 100 lawmakers consistently voted against chemical safeguards: study CNN's Anderson Cooper unloads on Trump Jr. for spreading 'idiotic' conspiracy theories about him Cohn: Jamie Dimon would be 'phenomenal' president MORE and the nationalist agenda he has pushed, announced on Twitter that he donated to Jones, invoking the phrase “country over party.” Flake uploaded a picture of a $100 check he made out to Jones’s campaign. 

The move comes as some Republicans express disgust in the GOP’s return to Moore in the final week of his Senate campaign. Moore, a former Alabama judge, has for weeks been embroiled in a sexual misconduct scandal, which includes accusations that he made sexual advances toward teenagers while in his 30s. Moore has denied the allegation that in 1979 he initiated sexual contact with a 14-year-old girl, but admitted in an interview last month that he may have dated women in their later teens during that period in his life.

Numerous Republican senators, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMurkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify McConnell rips Democrats for handling of Kavanaugh nomination Kavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow MORE (R-Ky.) called on Moore to step aside from the race last month following the accusations. 

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But the general demeanor from Republicans appeared to change in the past week. McConnell said in an interview Sunday that the election is in the hands of the Alabama voters.

President Trump’s full-throated endorsement of Moore on Monday helped bring back a key resource for the embattled Republican’s campaign. Hours after Trump officially backed Moore, the Republican National Committee reinstated its fundraising agreement with Moore’s campaign.

Moore will face off against Jones Tuesday in the special election for the seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsThe Hill’s 12:30 Report — Kavanaugh accuser willing to testify | Kavanaugh denies allegations, says he’s willing to testify | 50 days from the midterms Ken Starr backs Mueller, says president 'must be held accountable' The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh confirmation in sudden turmoil MORE.