GOP strategist donates to Alabama Democrat

GOP strategist donates to Alabama Democrat
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A former strategist for Gov. John Kasich (R-Ohio) and Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainBiden's pick for vice president doesn't matter much Juan Williams: Biden's promises on women are a big deal Ernst calls for public presidential campaign funds to go to masks, protective equipment MORE’s (R-Ariz.) 2008 presidential campaign said Wednesday that he donated to Alabama Democratic Senate nominee Doug Jones.

“Proud to join my fellow true GOP warriors @MarkSalter55 @murphymike @MattSDavid @Timodc in donating to @GDouglasJones for U.S. Senate. We're doing this to put America first, but also to save the GOP. Doug Jones is an honorable man & will be a good Senator. #CountryOverParty,” John Weaver wrote on Twitter, referencing several other prominent Republican strategists.

Weaver confirmed to The Hill that he donated $500 to Jones’s campaign. Tim Miller, one of the strategists mentioned in Weaver’s tweet, announced last month in a blog post that he donated to the Alabama Democrat.

Weaver’s tweet comes one day after Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeMcSally campaign to suspend TV ads, canvassing amid pandemic Coronavirus isn't the only reason Congress should spend less time in DC Trump Jr. says he inherited 'Tourette's of the thumbs' from his father MORE (R-Ariz.), a staunch critic of President TrumpDonald John TrumpIllinois governor says state has gotten 10 percent of medical equipments it's requested Biden leads Trump by 6 points in national poll Tesla offers ventilators free of cost to hospitals, Musk says MORE and the nationalist agenda he has pushed, announced on Twitter that he donated to Jones, invoking the phrase “country over party.” Flake uploaded a picture of a $100 check he made out to Jones’s campaign. 

The move comes as some Republicans express disgust in the GOP’s return to Moore in the final week of his Senate campaign. Moore, a former Alabama judge, has for weeks been embroiled in a sexual misconduct scandal, which includes accusations that he made sexual advances toward teenagers while in his 30s. Moore has denied the allegation that in 1979 he initiated sexual contact with a 14-year-old girl, but admitted in an interview last month that he may have dated women in their later teens during that period in his life.

Numerous Republican senators, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Health Care: White House projects grim death toll from coronavirus | Trump warns of 'painful' weeks ahead | US surpasses China in official virus deaths | CDC says 25 percent of cases never show symptoms 14 things to know for today about coronavirus Trump says he wouldn't have acted differently on coronavirus without impeachment MORE (R-Ky.) called on Moore to step aside from the race last month following the accusations. 

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But the general demeanor from Republicans appeared to change in the past week. McConnell said in an interview Sunday that the election is in the hands of the Alabama voters.

President Trump’s full-throated endorsement of Moore on Monday helped bring back a key resource for the embattled Republican’s campaign. Hours after Trump officially backed Moore, the Republican National Committee reinstated its fundraising agreement with Moore’s campaign.

Moore will face off against Jones Tuesday in the special election for the seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsAlabama postpones March 31 GOP Senate runoff Biden has broken all the 'rules' of presidential primaries The Hill's Campaign Report: Defiant Sanders vows to stay in race MORE.