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Roy Moore to ride horseback to polling station

Roy Moore to ride horseback to polling station
© Getty

GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore and his wife will ride horses to their Alabama polling location on Tuesday.

A schedule released by the Moore campaign for the Dec. 12 election includes “Traditional Horseback Ride to their Polling Location."

Moore and his wife, Kayla, typically ride horses to every election where Moore is a candidate. They rode horseback to the Alabama run-off, where Moore beat out Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeAlabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future Sessions hits back at Trump days ahead of Alabama Senate runoff The biggest political upsets of the decade MORE to be the GOP nominee, and to the first round of the GOP primary in August.

Most recent polls have put Moore ahead of opponent Democrat Doug Jones for the Senate seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTime to bring federal employees home for every holiday Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future Tuberville incorrectly says Gore was president-elect in 2000 MORE, despite a series of allegations that he sexually assaulted teenage girls.

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Nine women have come forward with accusations that Moore pursued them either romantically or sexually when they were teenagers and he was in his twenties and thirties, including one who said he had a sexual encounter with her when she was 14 years old and he was 32.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden says GOP senators have called to congratulate him Biden: Trump attending inauguration is 'of consequence' to the country Biden says family will avoid business conflicts MORE has thrown his support behind Moore, and several GOP lawmakers have said it is up to the people of Alabama to decide, with some walking back previous calls for Moore to withdraw from the race.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanAmerican Greatness editor on how Trump's abandonment of populism affected 2020 election Paul Ryan calls for Trump to accept results: 'The election is over' Bottom line MORE (R-Wis.) on Thursday reiterated his call for Moore to step down, just as Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump, Biden clash over transition holdup, pandemic plans The Hill's Morning Report - Fearing defeat, Trump claims 'illegal' ballots The Hill's Morning Report - Biden inches closer to victory MORE (D-Minn.) was announcing his own resignation from the Senate over sexual misconduct allegations.