GOP senator joins calls for ethics probe if Moore wins Senate election

Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisNorth Carolina Senate race emerges as 2020 bellwether The Hill's Campaign Report: North Carolina emerges as key battleground for Senate control Campaigns pivot toward health awareness as races sidelined by coronavirus MORE (R-N.C.) said Thursday that if Roy Moore is elected to the Senate next week, there should be an ethics investigation into the sexual assault and misconduct allegations against him.

Tillis said on Buzzfeed’s “AM to DM” Twitter morning show that he thinks an investigation should take place before the chamber moves to expel Moore or take other action.

"We need to examine the facts and let those facts lead us where they may,” he said.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellLawmakers outline proposals for virtual voting Overnight Health Care: Trump calls report on hospital shortages 'another fake dossier' | Trump weighs freezing funding to WHO | NY sees another 731 deaths | States battle for supplies | McConnell, Schumer headed for clash Phase-four virus relief hits a wall MORE (R-Ky.) has also called for an immediate ethics investigation if Moore wins the Alabama special election, while National Republican Senate Committee Chairman Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerGOP senator calls for investigation into 'mismanagement' of strategic ventilators Romney says he tested negative for coronavirus, will remain in quarantine Senate GOP super PAC books more than million in fall ads MORE (Colo.) has called for his expulsion from the Senate.

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Moore faces allegations from nearly 10 women who say he pursued them as teenagers when he was in his 20s and 30s, including multiple women who say he assaulted them. 

Tillis originally called for Moore to withdraw from the race and said Thursday that he still stands by that position, but added that until Moore is under the jurisdiction of the Senate, the decision is in the hands of Alabama voters.

"There’s Supreme Court precedent to say that we really don’t have the authority to deny him being seated,” he said. “But we do have jurisdiction over members, and we use an ethics investigation and then we look at what remedies come from that.”

Tillis also criticized colleagues who have stood by Moore on the basis that he will help advance the GOP agenda.

“Anyone that would say, ‘Yeah, he’s got problems but he’s a Republican vote’ really ought to rethink whether or not they should be in this institution,” he said.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpCDC updates website to remove dosage guidance on drug touted by Trump Trump says he'd like economy to reopen 'with a big bang' but acknowledges it may be limited Graham backs Trump, vows no money for WHO in next funding bill MORE threw his support behind Moore this week, saying that Alabama can’t have a “liberal person” like Democratic challenger Doug Jones in the Senate.

Following Trump’s endorsement, the Republican National Committee (RNC) reinstated its support of Moore, giving $170,000 to the Alabama Republican Party to help the campaign, after originally distancing itself from the candidate.

Gardner, the chairman of the Senate GOP's campaign arm, broke with Trump and the RNC on Thursday, saying "we will never" endorse Moore.

Also Thursday, House Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanWho should be the Democratic vice presidential candidate? The Pelosi administration It's not populism that's killing America's democracy MORE (R-Wis.) repeated his calls for Moore to drop out of the campaign, regardless of polls showing a tight race with Jones. 

“I think he should have dropped out,” Ryan told reporters at his weekly news conference. “Just because the polling has changed doesn’t change my opinion on that, so I stand by what I said before.”