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Moore accuser says she added notes below Moore's yearbook signature

A woman who has accused Alabama GOP Senate nominee Roy Moore of sexual misconduct says she made her own notes below a yearbook signature she claims was made by Moore.
Beverly Young Nelson, who has accused Moore of sexually assaulting her decades ago when she was 16 years old, told ABC News in a Friday interview that she made notes underneath Moore's alleged yearbook signature, but defended the veracity of the message itself.
 
"Beverly, he signed your yearbook?" ABC News reporter Tom Llamas asked.  
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"He did sign it," Nelson replied. 
 
"And you made some notes underneath?" Llamas followed up.
 
"Yes," she answered. 
 
When Nelson accused Moore of sexual assaulting her after offering her a ride home from work, she produced a high school yearbook she says was signed by Moore as proof that she knew him at the time. 
 
“To a sweeter, more beautiful girl I could not say Merry Christmas. Christmas 1977. Love, Roy Moore, D.A," the inscription reads. Below it reads the date and the name of the restaurant where she worked at the time. 
 
The credibility of the signature has become a source of contention between Moore's critics and supporters.
 
In the footage aired by ABC News, Nelson did not clarify what notes she made in the yearbook or when she made them. But her lawyer, Gloria Allred, told the network that they are going to hold a Friday press conference to present more evidence that supports Nelson's claims. 
 
Moore has denied Nelson's allegations as well as the flurry of others that have surfaced over the past month from women who say Moore pursued them as teenagers about the same time. He's also taken that denial a step further, arguing that "I do not know any of these women."
 
During his initial denials on Fox News pundit Sean Hannity's radio show, he admitted that he remembered at least two of the women. 
 
His campaign has also denied that Moore ever signed the yearbook in the first place, criticizing Nelson for not turning the book over for independent analysis.