RNC member resigns over party’s support for Roy Moore

RNC member resigns over party’s support for Roy Moore
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A member of the Republican National Committee (RNC) resigned over the weekend, citing her disgust with the RNC’s support for embattled GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore.

Joyce Simmons, a RNC member from Nebraska, informed RNC Chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel of her resignation on Dec. 8. In a Monday statement, Simmons said she was driven to cut ties with the national party over its continued support for Moore after he was accused of romantically and sexually pursuing teenage girls.

“I strongly disagree with the recent RNC financial support directed to the Alabama Republican Party for use in the Roy Moore race,” Simmons said in a statement. 

Simmons cited Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyFive takeaways from Trump's budget Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Trump unveils 2020 budget | Calls for cuts to NIH | Proposes user fees on e-cigs | Azar heads to Capitol to defend blueprint | Key drug price bill gets hearing this week Trump's emergency declaration looms over Pentagon funding fight MORE (R-Ala.), who has criticized Moore and said over the weekend that the state could "do better."

“There is much I could say about the situation but I will defer to this weekend’s comments by Senator Shelby. I will miss so many of you that I knew well; and I wish I could have continued my service to the national Republican Party that I used to know well.”

The RNC didn't respond to a request for comment.

The RNC initially cut ties with Moore amid a cascade of allegations against him from women who said that Moore had engaged in sexual contact with them or sought inappropriate romantic relationships with them while they were teenagers and he was a district attorney.

But President TrumpDonald John TrumpHow to stand out in the crowd: Kirsten Gillibrand needs to find her niche Countdown clock is on for Mueller conclusions Omar: White supremacist attacks are rising because Trump publicly says 'Islam hates us' MORE endorsed Moore, saying he doesn’t want the seat in the deep red state to be filled by Democrat Doug Jones.

Following Trump’s endorsement, the RNC quietly reinstated its support for Moore and has directed financial resources to his campaign.

The National Republican Senatorial Committee refused to reinstate its support for Moore, and its chairman, Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerHow to stand out in the crowd: Kirsten Gillibrand needs to find her niche Overnight Defense: Trump to reverse North Korea sanctions imposed by Treasury | Move sparks confusion | White House says all ISIS territory in Syria retaken | US-backed forces report heavy fighting | Two US troops killed in Afghanistan Overnight Health Care: CDC pushes for expanding HIV testing, treatment | Dem group launches ads attacking Trump on Medicare, Medicaid cuts | Hospitals, insurers spar over surprise bills | O'Rourke under pressure from left on Medicare for all MORE (R-Colo.), has said that if Moore wins, the Senate should vote to expel him.

According to the RealClearPolitics average of polls, Moore leads Jones by 2.5 points ahead of Tuesday’s special election.

Individual polls results have varied widely. A Fox News survey released Monday found Jones ahead by 10, while an Emerson survey released over the weekend showed Moore in the lead by 9 points.