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Moore spokesman: He 'probably' still thinks homosexual conduct should be illegal

A spokesman for GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore's campaign said Tuesday that Moore "probably" still believes that homosexual conduct should be illegal when questioned about it on CNN.

"It's just a sin, OK? That's what it is," Ted Crockett told host Jake Tapper. "It's what my Bible tells me — the Old Testament and the New Testament. That's what this is about."

"You people want to take the whole 2,000 or 3,000 years of our history and you all just want to throw it out the window, as if you're just going to make your own rules, your own man-made rules, and do whatever you want," he added.

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Moore, who is besieged by allegations of sexual misconduct, has said in the past that he believes homosexual conduct should be illegal, that Muslims shouldn't be allowed to serve in public office and that events such as the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks were divine retribution for increasing secularism and immorality in American society. 

Crockett said Moore's campaign was about advocating for a return to "moral law," arguing that lawmakers in Washington too often eschewed biblical teachings. 

Moore, a former Alabama Supreme Court chief justice, has repeatedly railed against what he sees as an absence of religion in government.

He was removed from the court twice. In 2003, he disobeyed a federal court order to remove a monument of the Ten Commandments that he had installed in the Alabama Judicial Building in Montgomery. And last year he told lower courts to ignore the Supreme Court ruling legalizing same-sex marriage.

Moore has been locked in a heated race against Democrat Doug Jones to fill the Senate seat vacated earlier this year by Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsGraham backs bill to protect Mueller Democrats in murky legal water with Whitaker lawsuits Whitaker’s past business dealings under scrutiny MORE.

While Alabama is typically considered a safe state for Republican candidates, the race between Moore and Jones tightened last month after multiple women came forward with allegations that Moore pursued sexual and romantic relations with them when they were teenagers and he was in his 30s. The youngest of the women says she was 14 when she and Moore had a sexual encounter.

He has denied the allegations and rebuffed calls from many GOP officials and lawmakers to withdraw from the race. President TrumpDonald John TrumpDeath toll in Northern California wildfire rises to 48: authorities Graham backs bill to protect Mueller Denham loses GOP seat in California MORE offered Moore his endorsement last week, and the Republican National Committee reinstated its support, following Trump's lead.