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Moore refuses to concede after Jones certified winner

Roy MooreRoy Stewart MooreAlabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future Long-shot Espy campaign sees national boost in weeks before election Ocasio-Cortez slams Tulsi Gabbard for amplifying ballot harvesting video MORE is refusing to concede the Alabama Senate special election, even after Democratic opponent Doug Jones’s victory was made official by the state.

Moore issued a statement on Thursday reiterating his claims that voter fraud caused him to lose the election.

"Election fraud experts across the country have agreed that this was a fraudulent election,” Moore said in his statement. "I’ve had to fight not only the Democrats but also the Republican Senate Leadership Fund and over $50 million in opposition spending from the Washington establishment.”

Alabama officials certified Jones’s victory earlier Thursday, despite Moore’s claims of voter fraud.

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Moore filed a last-minute complaint late Wednesday attempting to block officials from certifying the results, but a judge rejected the challenge. Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill told CNN that his office had fully investigated the voter fraud allegations.

Moore lost to Jones earlier this month by about 1.5 points after a campaign that brought national attention for months before the Dec. 12 special election.

Moore was the front-runner to fill the Alabama Senate seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsHarris to resign from Senate seat on Monday Rosenstein: Zero tolerance immigration policy 'never should have been proposed or implemented' Sessions, top DOJ officials knew 'zero tolerance' would separate families, watchdog finds MORE, despite a series of accusations of sexual misconduct, including assault, involving teenage girls in the past. Moore has repeatedly denied the allegations, and he said Thursday that he took a polygraph test after the election that proves the allegations are false.

President TrumpDonald TrumpIran's leader vows 'revenge,' posting an image resembling Trump Former Sanders spokesperson: Biden 'backing away' from 'populist offerings' Justice Dept. to probe sudden departure of US attorney in Atlanta after Trump criticism MORE threw his support behind Moore at the last minute, even though other GOP leaders were calling for him to withdraw from the race. 

"I have stood for the truth about God and the Constitution for the people of Alabama,” Moore said in his Thursday statement. "I have no regrets. To God be the glory."