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Candidate to replace Corker would welcome Trump's help on campaign trail

Rep. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnHawley votes against anti-Asian hate crime bill Senate passes anti-Asian hate crimes bill Senate locks in hate crimes deal, setting up Thursday passage MORE (R-Tenn.) said Thursday she would welcome President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump: LeBron James's 'racist rants' are divisive, nasty North Carolina man accused of fraudulently obtaining .5M in PPP loans Biden announces picks to lead oceans, lands agencies MORE’s support in her campaign next year to replace outgoing Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerFox News inks contributor deal with former Democratic House member Senate GOP faces retirement brain drain Roy Blunt won't run for Senate seat in 2022 MORE (Tenn.), one of Trump's most vocal GOP critics.

“President Trump is very popular in Tennessee, and people are so encouraged by the work that he has done,” Blackburn said on CNN. 

“It would probably be very helpful if he were to come,” she added.

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Blackburn, a staunch supporter of Trump, announced in October she will run for Senate in 2018 to fill the seat of Corker, who is retiring.

In her announcement, Blackburn said she would fight to build a border wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, called the Senate “totally dysfunctional” and described herself as a “card-carrying Tennessee conservative.” 

She is the front-runner for the GOP nomination, after Gov. Bill Haslam (R) decided not to enter the race. 

Blackburn, who is backed by Breitbart News chief and former Trump strategist Stephen Bannon, is likely to face former Gov. Phil Bredesen (D) in the general election. The entry of Bredesen, the last Democrat to win statewide office in Tennessee, saw the Cook Political Report shift its forecast of the race to the toss-up column.

A poll from October, which the Senate Democrats' campaign arm released this month, found Bredesen leading Blackburn by 5 points, while one from a pro-Trump super PAC released the same day gave the Republican lawmaker a 9-point lead.

Corker, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has repeatedly criticized Trump and his policies, saying in October that he would not support the president for reelection.

“I think he’s proven himself unable to rise to the occasion,” Corker told CNN.

“I don't know why he lowers himself to such a low, low standard and debases our country in the way that he does, but he does," he added. "I think the debasing of our nation ... will be what he'll be remembered most for." 

Some Republicans have been divided over whether backing from Trump, who has historically low approval ratings, would help or hurt their chances during 2018 midterm elections.

Trump backed Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings Trump faces test of power with early endorsements Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future MORE (R-Ala.) in his primary runoff against Roy MooreRoy Stewart MooreThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings Trump faces test of power with early endorsements CPAC, all-in for Trump, is not what it used to be MORE for the Republican nomination in the Alabama Senate special election. Strange lost to Moore, who eventually earned Trump's endorsement.

Moore, who was accused of sexual misconduct, eventually lost to Democrat Doug Jones.

Trump, however, quickly distanced himself from Moore, saying he backed Strange because he knew Moore could not win the general election.

He also supported Virginia gubernatorial candidate Ed Gillespie (R), who lost to Democrat Ralph Northam in November. After the election, Trump said Gillespie "did not embrace me or what I stand for."

Retiring Rep. Charlie DentCharles (Charlie) Wieder Dent22 retired GOP members of Congress call for Trump's impeachment Seven Senate races to watch in 2022 The magnificent moderation of Susan Collins MORE (R-Pa.) said in an interview Sunday he believes candidates in certain parts of the country “would rather he not visit,” while others would likely benefit from Trump’s support.