At least a dozen Obama-era officials are running in 2018 midterms

At least a dozen Obama-era officials are running in 2018 midterms
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At least a dozen former Obama administration officials are challenging Republican incumbents for House seats across the country.

The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday that many of the former officials are looking to unseat GOP lawmakers deemed vulnerable by House Democrats as part of a wider effort to take back a majority in the chamber.

The roster of Obama administration alumni includes former White House technology adviser Brian Forde, who is challenging Rep. Mimi Walters (R-Calif.) in her Orange County congressional district, as well as Colin Allred and Ed Meier, a former Housing and Urban Development official and State Department, official respectively, who are both challenging Rep. Pete SessionsPeter Anderson SessionsHillicon Valley — Presented by CTIA and America's wireless industry — Lawmaker sees political payback in fight over 'deepfakes' measure | Tech giants to testify at hearing on 'censorship' claims | Google pulls the plug on AI council Lawmaker alleges political payback in failed 'deepfakes' measure As Russia collusion fades, Ukrainian plot to help Clinton emerges MORE (R-Texas).

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Other Obama administration alumni running for office include former acting Assistant Secretary of Defense Elissa Slotkin, who is running against Rep. Mike Bishop (R-Mich.) and Sarah Jacobs, a former State Department official, who is challenging Rep. Darrell IssaDarrell Edward IssaThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democrats clash over future of party in heated debate Issa says he will run for Congress if not confirmed to trade post by Nov. 3 The Hill's Campaign Report: Pressure builds for Democrats who missed third debate cut MORE (R-Calif.).

According to The Wall Street Journal, the former Obama officials stay in contact and text each other.

Democrats are hoping to capitalize on President TrumpDonald John TrumpHarris bashes Kavanaugh's 'sham' nomination process, calls for his impeachment after sexual misconduct allegation Celebrating 'Hispanic Heritage Month' in the Age of Trump Let's not play Charlie Brown to Iran's Lucy MORE's dwindling popularity in the 2018 midterm elections. They have been energized in recent months by election wins in Virginia, New Jersey and Alabama. 

According to the Cook Political Report, 63 Republican-held districts are rated some degree of competitive. But 21 seats held by Democrats are also considered at least somewhat competitive by Cook, meaning that Democrats will have to work to hold onto those seats.

Democrats will need to take 24 seats from Republicans in 2018 to win back the majority in the House.