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At least a dozen Obama-era officials are running in 2018 midterms

At least a dozen Obama-era officials are running in 2018 midterms
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At least a dozen former Obama administration officials are challenging Republican incumbents for House seats across the country.

The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday that many of the former officials are looking to unseat GOP lawmakers deemed vulnerable by House Democrats as part of a wider effort to take back a majority in the chamber.

The roster of Obama administration alumni includes former White House technology adviser Brian Forde, who is challenging Rep. Mimi Walters (R-Calif.) in her Orange County congressional district, as well as Colin Allred and Ed Meier, a former Housing and Urban Development official and State Department, official respectively, who are both challenging Rep. Pete SessionsPeter Anderson SessionsElection Countdown: O'Rourke goes on the attack | Takeaways from fiery second Texas Senate debate | Heitkamp apologizes for ad misidentifying abuse victims | Trump Jr. to rally for Manchin challenger | Rick Scott leaves trail to deal with hurricane damage Credit union group to spend .8 million for vulnerable Dem, GOP incumbents Election Countdown: Cruz, O'Rourke fight at pivotal point | Ryan hitting the trail for vulnerable Republicans | Poll shows Biden leading Dem 2020 field | Arizona Senate debate tonight MORE (R-Texas).

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Other Obama administration alumni running for office include former acting Assistant Secretary of Defense Elissa Slotkin, who is running against Rep. Mike Bishop (R-Mich.) and Sarah Jacobs, a former State Department official, who is challenging Rep. Darrell IssaDarrell Edward IssaMidterms in 2018 become most expensive in history Dems target small cluster of states in battle for House Painting of Trump with past GOP presidents hung up in White House MORE (R-Calif.).

According to The Wall Street Journal, the former Obama officials stay in contact and text each other.

Democrats are hoping to capitalize on President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump renews attacks against Tester over VA nominee on eve of Montana rally Trump submits 2017 federal income tax returns Corker: Trump administration 'clamped down' on Saudi intel, canceled briefing MORE's dwindling popularity in the 2018 midterm elections. They have been energized in recent months by election wins in Virginia, New Jersey and Alabama. 

According to the Cook Political Report, 63 Republican-held districts are rated some degree of competitive. But 21 seats held by Democrats are also considered at least somewhat competitive by Cook, meaning that Democrats will have to work to hold onto those seats.

Democrats will need to take 24 seats from Republicans in 2018 to win back the majority in the House.