2020 Democrats vote against Schumer deal

2020 Democrats vote against Schumer deal
© Greg Nash

Nearly every Democratic senator considering running for president in 2020 voted against reopening the government on Monday, as furious liberals accused Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - The omicron threat and Biden's plan to beat it Lawmakers take aim at 'Grinches' using bots to target consumers during holidays Democratic frustration growing over stagnating voting rights bills MORE (D-N.Y.) of selling out the base in the immigration fight.

Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOn The Money — Powell pivots as inflation rises Pence-linked group launches 0K ad campaign in West Virginia praising Manchin Senators huddle on path forward for SALT deduction in spending bill MORE (I-Vt.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenSenate GOP blocks defense bill, throwing it into limbo Restless progressives eye 2024 Poll: Harris, Michelle Obama lead for 2024 if Biden doesn't run MORE (D-Mass.), Cory BookerCory BookerPoll: Harris, Michelle Obama lead for 2024 if Biden doesn't run Five reasons for Biden, GOP to be thankful this season Senators call for Smithsonian Latino, women's museums to be built on National Mall MORE (D-N.J.), Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisTrump: McConnell must use debt limit to crush Biden agenda Building back a better vice presidency Stacey Abrams nominated to board of solar energy firm MORE (D-Calif.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandGillibrand, bipartisan lawmakers push to keep military justice overhaul in NDAA Klobuchar confident spending bill will be finished before Christmas Five ways Senate could change Biden's spending plan MORE (N.Y.) — all voted against a spending measure to reopen the government. 

So did Sen Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleySenate GOP blocks defense bill, throwing it into limbo Lawmakers call on Olympic committee to press China on human rights abuses Senate Democrats call on Biden to push for COVID-19 vaccine patent waivers at WTO MORE (D-Ore.), who could also run for president.

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Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharKlobuchar confident spending bill will be finished before Christmas Sunday shows preview: New COVID-19 variant emerges; supply chain issues and inflation persist The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden renominates Powell as Fed chair MORE (D-Minn.) is the only Democratic senator widely seen as a potential 2020 candidate to vote “yes” on the Schumer deal.

Schumer came under fire from liberal groups.

Credo political director Murshed Zaheed called Schumer “the worst negotiator in Washington” and said he got “outmaneuvered” by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate nearing deal on defense bill after setback On The Money — Powell pivots as inflation rises Schumer eyeing Build Back Better vote as soon as week of Dec. 13 MORE (R-Ky.).

Chuck SchumerChuck SchumerThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - The omicron threat and Biden's plan to beat it Lawmakers take aim at 'Grinches' using bots to target consumers during holidays Democratic frustration growing over stagnating voting rights bills MORE has failed dreamers and let the entire Democratic Party down,” Zaheed said.

Senators were more measured in their comments and did not criticize Schumer directly. Well more than half the Democratic caucus — 32 Democrats plus Independent Sen. Angus KingAngus KingAmazon, Facebook, other large firms would pay more under proposed minimum tax, Warren's office says Senators look to defense bill to move cybersecurity measures Energy information chief blames market for high fuel prices MORE (Maine) — backed the deal.

Harris said Monday’s deal falls “far short” of the “ironclad guarantee” of protections for recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), an Obama-era program that allowed undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children to secure approval to work and go to school here. 

Harris said that she doesn’t trust McConnell’s promise to bring a DACA bill to the floor in the next month.

“I refuse to put the lives of nearly 700,000 young people in the hands of someone who has repeatedly gone back on his word,” Harris said. “I will do everything in my power to continue to protect Dreamers from deportation.”

The deal reached Monday would reopen the government and fund it through Feb. 8. McConnell has promised to bring an immigration bill addressing those protected under DACA within the next month. The program is set to expire in March.

“Now there is a real pathway to get a bill on the floor and through the Senate,” Schumer said Monday.

But the deal falls short of Democrats’ initial demands, raising questions among liberals about the point of the government shutdown and what they got in return for agreeing to reopen it.

Senate Democrats had initially demanded that Republicans agree in principle to a deal that would provide permanent protections for DACA recipients.