36 people who could challenge Trump in 2020

The field of Democrats who could jockey for a White House bid in 2020 is growing by the day, as more and more potential candidates are eyed as possible challengers to President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump-appointed State Department official embellished her resume, made fake Time cover: report Bolton says Trump's Turkey policy motivated by personal, financial interest: NBC Tariffs threaten 1.5M jobs: Study MORE.

Many potential candidates have sought to stand out from the field through vocal opposition to the Trump agenda — voting against the bipartisan two-year budget deal or calling for the president’s resignation.

Here are 36 potential candidates, from top contenders to long shots, who could run in 2020:

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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTech firms face skepticism over California housing response Press: Another billionaire need not apply Ex-Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick mulling 2020 run: report MORE (I-Vt.)
Sanders reportedly met with top advisers in late January to discuss a potential 2020 run. But Sanders said he’s focused on his reelection in 2018. Still, the 2016 Democratic primary candidate hasn’t shied away from opportunities to contrast himself to Trump. The favorite of the Democrats’ progressive wing delivered his own response to the State of the Union address, calling Trump a “bully.” If elected, Sanders would be 79 when taking office in 2021.
 
Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPoll: Buttigieg leads Democratic field in Iowa Barr to launch anti-gun violence initiative during public impeachment hearing Biden will always represent the 'safety candidate,' says Democratic strategist MORE
A recent poll of the hypothetical 2020 field showed Biden, who benefits from massive name recognition after two terms as vice president, easily leading the Democratic pack. Biden reportedly said privately that he believes he’s the only Democrat who can beat Trump in 2020. And Biden, who would be 78 in January 2021, publicly weighed the possibility of running on ABC’s “The View” in December.
 
Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSenate panel clears controversial Trump court pick Advocates step up efforts for horse racing reform bill after more deaths Harris proposes keeping schools open for 10 hours a day MORE (D-N.Y.)
Gillibrand, 51, gained prominence for speaking out against sexual harassment and assault, and has sought to position herself as one of Trump’s leading Senate antagonists by frequently voting against his nominees. After Trump tweeted that she “would do anything” for campaign donations — which many thought had sexual implications — Gillibrand shot back that Trump “cannot silence me” with a “sexist smear.”
 
Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenPoll: Buttigieg leads Democratic field in Iowa Biden will always represent the 'safety candidate,' says Democratic strategist Former Clinton aide: 'Biden has had a number of issues in using somewhat gendered language' MORE (D-Mass.)
Warren, another progressive favorite, is frequently touted as a top 2020 contender. But she’s downplayed presidential rumors and says she’s focused on her reelection in 2018. Warren, who will be 71 on Inauguration Day in 2021, was one of several Senate Democrats with possible presidential ambitions who voted against the two-year budget deal. Warren hasn’t gone as far as some colleagues, however, who have called for Trump to resign because of the sexual harassment allegations against him.
 
Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerThe Hill's Campaign Report: Bloomberg looks to upend Democratic race Poll: Biden support hits record low of 26 percent The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump demands Bidens testify MORE (D-N.J.)
Booker has continued to raise his profile, most recently during a contentious Senate Judiciary Committee hearing with Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenFive things to watch at Supreme Court's DACA hearings This week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry Senators urge Trump to fill vacancies at DHS MORE. Booker, 48, made a rousing speech accusing Nielsen of being complicit with Trump after Nielsen said she didn’t hear Trump say that the United States shouldn’t accept immigrants from “shithole countries.”
 
Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisPoll: Buttigieg leads Democratic field in Iowa Press: Another billionaire need not apply Saagar Enjeti dismisses Warren, Klobuchar claims of sexism MORE (D-Calif.)
Harris, 53, a rising star in the party, generated national attention after she was cut off from questioning a witness at Senate Intelligence Committee hearings. But Harris, like many potential 2020 candidates, has insisted that she’s not thinking about future campaigns.
 
Former talk show host Oprah Winfrey
Winfrey set off presidential rumors after her speech about sexual harassment at the Golden Globes last month. But Winfrey, 64, told InStyle Magazine that she doesn’t “have the DNA for it.”
 
Former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderObama celebrates 'great night for our country' after Democrats' victories in Virginia and Kentucky After Obama-era abuses, Republican hysteria over impeachment process is absurd Lawmakers come together to honor Cummings: 'One of the greats in our country's history' MORE
Holder is the latest politician who wouldn’t rule out a 2020 bid. When asked about a future White House run, he responded, “We’ll see.” Holder, 67, said he’s focused on his National Democratic Redistricting Committee, a Democratic effort to reverse Republican redistricting gains.

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro
Castro, who was on Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonFive landmark moments of testimony to Congress Top diplomat said request for specific probes in Ukraine was 'contrary' to US policy Feehery: What Republicans must do to adapt to political realignment MORE’s 2016 shortlist for vice president, will make his first foray into presidential politics with a Friday trip to New Hampshire, which holds the first presidential primary. Castro, 43, said he has “every interest in running,” and will headline the New Hampshire Young Democrats 2018 Granite Slate Awards Dinner.

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley (D)
O’Malley, 55, has already been testing the waters after an unsuccessful run in the 2016 Democratic primary.
 
Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin DelaneyBloomberg run should push Warren to the center — but won't The Hill's 12:30 Report: Impeachment fight enters new stage Biden hits Warren over 'Medicare for All' plan MORE (D-Md.)
Delaney, 54, became the first declared presidential candidate of 2020 when he launched his campaign last July. The retiring congressman commissioned the first ad of the 2020 primaries in Iowa — which holds the first presidential caucuses.

Rep. Luis Gutiérrez (D-Ill.)
Gutiérrez, 62, is also retiring from Congress at the end of 2018, and is reportedly exploring a presidential run. The longtime congressman is a strong proponent of immigration reform, and backed an effort to introduce articles of impeachment against Trump.
 
Billionaire mega-donor Tom Steyer
Steyer, 60, ruled out running for office in 2018, but he hasn’t closed the door on 2020. He plans to spend $30 million to help Democrats take back the House in 2018, and is continuing his ad campaign calling for Trump’s impeachment.
 
Former Secretary of State John KerryJohn Forbes KerryDemocrats debate how to defeat Trump: fight or heal GOP senators press State Department for Hunter Biden, Burisma records Krystal Ball hits media over questions on Sanders's electability MORE
The 2004 presidential nominee has stayed out of the limelight since leaving his position as secretary of State. But recent reports say Kerry, 74, is considering another bid.

Former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D)
McAuliffe, a potential contender close to the Clintons, could be boosted by recent Democratic gains in Virginia. McAuliffe, 61, can also draw on a large fundraising network as a former chairman of the Democratic National Committee (DNC).
 
Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyOvernight Defense: Trump, Erdogan confirm White House meeting | Public impeachment hearings set for next week | Top defense appropriator retiring Fairness, tradition, and the Constitution demand the 'whistleblower' step forward Senate Democrat: Colleague was working on fantasy football trade instead of listening to Schumer MORE (D-Conn.)
Murphy, 44, has sworn off a bid in 2020, but that hasn’t stopped the speculation about whether the leading gun control advocate will make a run.
 
Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharPress: Another billionaire need not apply Saagar Enjeti dismisses Warren, Klobuchar claims of sexism Warren on winning over male voters: I was told to 'smile more' MORE (D-Minn.)
Klobuchar, 57, may have hurt her chances by not joining Democrats in opposing the recent budget deal for its lack of protection for “Dreamers,” but her supporters say her policy chops can’t be ruled out.
 
Former Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander
After losing a surprisingly close Missouri Senate race in 2016, 36-year-old Kander has raised his national profile with a new national group meant to fight voter suppression. He’s also made the rounds at various local Democratic events, making stops in key early states.

South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D)
Buttigieg, 36, has kept busy since making a headline-grabbing bid to chair the DNC. The openly gay Navy reservist has traveled the country to speak on panels and headline local Democratic Party events, and would offer Democrats a chance to field a midwestern politician — although he could be criticized for a lack of experience beyond the local level.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio (D)
Fresh off his reelection as mayor, the 56-year-old de Blasio stoked speculation about a bid with his trip to Iowa late last year. While he said that he isn’t running for president, he’s kept up rumors of a possible bid while emerging as a progressive Trump critic.

Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineProgressive freshmen jump into leadership PAC fundraising Lawmakers wager local booze, favorite foods in World Series bets José Andrés: Food served in the Capitol came from undocumented immigrants MORE (D-Va.)
Kaine, 59, Clinton’s running mate in 2016, is expected to win reelection to the Senate. That victory could give him momentum going into 2020.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick (D)
Patrick, 61, has been out of office since 2015, but those close to former President Obama have reportedly urged him to run for the White House.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D)
Cuomo, 60, is one of several New Yorkers eyeing potential presidential bids in 2020. And he’s been making a name for himself through his opposition to the GOP’s tax overhaul.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti (D)
Garcetti, 47, got some attention last year from donors, and generated some more national buzz with a recent hike with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownSunday shows — New impeachment phase dominates Brown confirms he won't enter 2020 race: 'I think it's a good field' GM officially sells Ohio plant, months after Trump touted sale MORE (D-Ohio)
Brown is a familiar name in White House shortlists, and was considered for Clinton’s vice president pick. But Brown, 65, could face a tough reelection race this cycle in one of the 10 states that Trump won in 2016.

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban
The 59-year-old billionaire businessman and “Shark Tank” star said late last year that there’s a “10 percent” chance he runs in 2020.

Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanStrategists say Warren 'Medicare for All' plan could appeal to centrists Trump mocks O'Rourke after Democrat drops out of race The Memo: What the leading 2020 Dems need to do MORE (D-Ohio)
Ryan, 44, earned a high profile last year when he challenged House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocrats sharpen their message on impeachment Congress hunts for path out of spending stalemate Siren song of impeachment lures Democrats toward election doom MORE (D-Calif.) for her leadership post.

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock (D)
Despite Trump’s 20-point victory in Montana, Bullock, 51, was reelected to the governor’s mansion in 2016. His victory could appeal to Democrats looking to compete in deep-red states.

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu (D)
Landrieu, 57, drew national attention when he made an impassioned speech calling for the removal of Confederate statues in his hometown.

Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo (D)
Raimondo, 46, the first woman to serve as Rhode Island governor, earned national exposure after she hosted the National Governors Association meeting last July.

Starbucks Executive Chairman Howard Schultz
Schultz, 64, stepped down as CEO of the popular coffee franchise in late 2016, sparking a flurry of stories that he could be considering a 2020 bid.

Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg
Sandberg’s book on corporate feminism, “Lean In,” drew high praise and raised the 48-year-old’s profile outside of Silicon Valley.

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson
The wrestler-turned-movie star, 45, said last year that he’s “seriously considering” a bid, although he said that 2024 is a more “realistic” option.

Former Acting Attorney General Sally YatesSally Caroline YatesMerriam-Webster: A 200-year-old dictionary offers hot political takes on Twitter Sally Yates: Moral fiber of US being 'shredded by unapologetic racism' Trump: 'Impossible for me to know' extent of Flynn investigation MORE
Yates became a hero to Democrats when Trump fired her for refusing to defend the travel ban. Yates, 57, said last year that she doesn’t envision herself running for office.

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (D)
Hickenlooper, 66, drew some short-lived buzz over rumors he could potentially form a unity ticket in 2020 with Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R). But Hickenlooper dismissed those rumors, saying he has “no ulterior motive” for working across the aisle with Kasich.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee (D)
The two-term governor and former congressman, 67, is expanding his network nationally as the new chairman of the Democratic Governors Association.

Ben Kamisar contributed.