Cook Political Report shifts 13 House races toward Dems

Cook Political Report shifts 13 House races toward Dems
© Victoria Sarno Jordan

The Cook Political Report has shifted several House races toward the Democratic Party ahead of November's midterm elections, the nonpartisan elections analyst said Friday.

A number of House Democrats had their seats shifted to the left by Cook, while the report says a number of Republicans could now face higher chances of defeat in November.

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In total, 13 races were shifted by Cook to the left in the latest rankings, including those involving Reps. Tom MacArthurThomas (Tom) Charles MacArthurRepublicans plot comeback in New Jersey Republicans spend more than million at Trump properties The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority MORE (R-N.J.), David ValadaoDavid Goncalves ValadaoCalifornia Republican ousted in 2018 announces rematch for House seat The 8 House Republicans who voted against Trump’s border wall The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by T-Mobile — The political currents that will drive the shutdown showdown MORE (R-Calif.) and Robert PittengerRobert Miller PittengerBottom Line North Carolina reporter says there could be 'new crop' of GOP candidates in 9th Congressional District race North Carolina board calls for new election in contested House race MORE (R-N.C.), who all saw their districts move from "likely" Republican to the more vulnerable category of "lean" Republican.

Cook also shifted some races involving Democratic incumbents, including Reps. Josh GottheimerJoshua (Josh) GottheimerProgressive group unveils first slate of 2020 congressional endorsements Hillicon Valley: Critics press feds to block Google, Fitbit deal | Twitter takes down Hamas, Hezbollah-linked accounts | TikTok looks to join online anti-terrorism effort | Apple pledges .5B to affordable housing Twitter takes down Hamas, Hezbollah-affiliated accounts after lawmaker pressure MORE (D-N.J.) and Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y.), from "likely" Democratic to the "solidly" Democratic category.

One big issue the analysis says Republicans will face is Pennsylvania's congressional district map, which was recently redrawn by the state's Supreme Court despite protests from state GOP leaders. The new lines caused Cook to shift a number of districts further to the left.

"Republicans desperately need to catch some breaks to offset the new Pennsylvania map," Cook Political Report House editor Dave Wasserman wrote.

"In this difficult environment, the [National Republican Congressional Committee] and the Congressional Leadership Fund have no choice but to run against Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiFeehery: Pivoting to infrastructure could help heal post-impeachment wounds Key GOP senator: 'We need a breakthrough' on spending talks Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Stopgap spending bill includes military pay raise | Schumer presses Pentagon to protect impeachment witnesses | US ends civil-nuclear waiver in Iran MORE and seek to individually disqualify Democratic nominees with negative ads over the summer and early fall — before those nominees can introduce themselves — in order to hold onto their majority," he added.

Democrats currently have an 8-point advantage over Republicans on a generic House ballot, the Cook report notes, and a recent Morning Consult poll showed President TrumpDonald John TrumpMost Americans break with Trump on Ukraine, but just 45 percent think he should be removed: poll Judge orders Democrats to give notice if they request Trump's NY tax returns Trump's doctor issues letter addressing 'speculation' about visit to Walter Reed MORE with a 41 percent approval rating with 54 percent of those surveyed disapproving of his job as president.

Democrats need a net gain of 23 seats in the midterms to retake the majority in the House.