Boehner to campaign for House GOP candidates

Boehner to campaign for House GOP candidates
© Greg Nash

Former Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerLott says lobbying firm cut ties to prevent him from taking clients Lobbying firm cuts ties to Trent Lott amid national anti-racism protests Bush, Romney won't support Trump reelection: NYT MORE (R-Ohio) will travel the country this summer to campaign for House Republicans ahead of this year's midterm elections.

BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerLott says lobbying firm cut ties to prevent him from taking clients Lobbying firm cuts ties to Trent Lott amid national anti-racism protests Bush, Romney won't support Trump reelection: NYT MORE plans to make at least seven stops on a bus tour starting in August, CNN reported Tuesday. The cross-country jaunt will mirror the bus tours he took while serving as a congressman and as Speaker.

“He likes getting out among the people, mixing it up and feeling the pulse of the nation, while supporting his former colleagues and the next generation of leaders,” Dave Schnittger, a spokesman for Boehner, told CNN.

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“This summer there’s both a demand for it and a renewed desire on his part,” he added.

Boehner represented a district in southwest Ohio for more than two decades. He served as Speaker from 2011 until his resignation in October 2015.

Since leaving Congress, Boehner has maintained a relatively low profile. He was the subject of a wide-ranging Politico profile that was published last October in which he recounted his time in office and chided some former colleagues, specifically former Rep. Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzThe myth of the conservative bestseller Elijah Cummings, Democratic chairman and powerful Trump critic, dies at 68 House Oversight panel demands DeVos turn over personal email records MORE (R-Utah) and Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanGOP-Trump fractures on masks open up Democrats start cracking down on masks for lawmakers Comer tapped to serve as top Republican on House Oversight MORE (R-Ohio).

Republicans have acknowledged they may face potential losses in November's midterms, and multiple polls have shown Democrats with steady leads on the generic ballot.

Democrats need to net 24 seats in order to take back control of the House.