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Boehner to campaign for House GOP candidates

Boehner to campaign for House GOP candidates
© Greg Nash

Former Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerAre maskless House members scofflaws? Israel, Democrats and the problem of the Middle East Joe Crowley to register as lobbyist for recording artists MORE (R-Ohio) will travel the country this summer to campaign for House Republicans ahead of this year's midterm elections.

BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerAre maskless House members scofflaws? Israel, Democrats and the problem of the Middle East Joe Crowley to register as lobbyist for recording artists MORE plans to make at least seven stops on a bus tour starting in August, CNN reported Tuesday. The cross-country jaunt will mirror the bus tours he took while serving as a congressman and as Speaker.

“He likes getting out among the people, mixing it up and feeling the pulse of the nation, while supporting his former colleagues and the next generation of leaders,” Dave Schnittger, a spokesman for Boehner, told CNN.

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“This summer there’s both a demand for it and a renewed desire on his part,” he added.

Boehner represented a district in southwest Ohio for more than two decades. He served as Speaker from 2011 until his resignation in October 2015.

Since leaving Congress, Boehner has maintained a relatively low profile. He was the subject of a wide-ranging Politico profile that was published last October in which he recounted his time in office and chided some former colleagues, specifically former Rep. Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzCongress's latest hacking investigation should model its most recent Fox News Audio expands stable of podcasts by adding five new shows The myth of the conservative bestseller MORE (R-Utah) and Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanHouse Judiciary releases McGahn testimony on Trump Democrats control the language of politics and culture — but for how long? Democrats claim vindication, GOP cries witch hunt as McGahn finally testifies MORE (R-Ohio).

Republicans have acknowledged they may face potential losses in November's midterms, and multiple polls have shown Democrats with steady leads on the generic ballot.

Democrats need to net 24 seats in order to take back control of the House.