Kamala Harris will no longer accept corporate PAC money

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisYang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee Delaney to DNC: Open second debate stage for candidates who qualified for past events MORE (D-Calif.) said Monday she will no longer accept donations from corporate PACs, the latest in a string of progressive Democrats who have vowed to do so.

Harris told the hosts of “The Breakfast Club” radio show in New York that she was caught off guard when asked recently at a town hall about accepting corporate donations. She said at the time it "depends."

“So I’ve actually made a decision since I’ve had that conversation that I’m not going to accept corporate PAC checks,” she said Monday.

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“We’re all supposed to have an equal vote, but money has now really tipped the balance between an individual having equal power in an election to a corporation,” she added. 

Harris said the Supreme Court’s 2010 decision in Citizens United v. FEC, which allowed corporations to make unlimited political contributions, has resulted in an “outsized influence” on politics.

Harris joins Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBloomberg apologizes after critics say his calling Booker 'well spoken' was racist Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee Booker unveils legislation for federal bill to ban discrimination against natural hair MORE (D-N.J.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandWhite House, Congress near deal to give 12 weeks paid parental leave to all federal workers Bloomberg on 2020 rivals blasting him for using his own money: 'They had a chance to go out and make a lot of money' Harris posts video asking baby if she'll run for president one day MORE (D-N.Y.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenArtist behind gold toilet offered to Trump sells banana duct-taped to a wall for 0,000 Democratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations MORE (D-Mass.), Maria CantwellMaria Elaine CantwellThere's a lot to like about the Senate privacy bill, if it's not watered down Hillicon Valley: House passes anti-robocall bill | Senators inch forward on privacy legislation | Trump escalates fight over tech tax | Illinois families sue TikTok | Senators get classified briefing on ransomware Senators want FERC to protect critical infrastructure from Huawei threats MORE (D-Wash.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersDemocratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee MORE (I-Vt.) in pledging not to accept corporate PAC donations.

Harris is considered a potential candidate for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. She demurred when asked about that possibility on Monday. 

“Right now, I’m just focused on what’s in front of me,” she said, adding that she’ll be working to turn out Democratic voters in this year’s midterm elections.