Roy Moore: I could run for governor

Roy Moore: I could run for governor
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Former Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy MooreRoy Stewart MooreVulnerable Senate Democrat urges unity: 'Not about what side of the aisle we're on' Sessions hits back at Trump days ahead of Alabama Senate runoff Judge allows Roy Moore lawsuit over Sacha Baron Cohen prank to proceed MORE, who lost a December special election after allegations of past child molestation and sexual misconduct surfaced, floated a possible future bid for office in a statement released Thursday.

"I have no plans at this time to run for office. Nevertheless, plans change. If the opportunity arises to make a difference, I will have no reluctance to again run for political office, including that of governor," he said in the statement.

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Moore lost the recent special election to fill Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump's policies on refugees are as simple as ABCs Ocasio-Cortez, Velázquez call for convention to decide Puerto Rico status White House officials voted by show of hands on 2018 family separations: report MORE's Senate seat in no small part thanks to the allegations that surfaced against him weeks before the election — including accusations that he initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old girl and sexually and romantically pursued teenagers decades ago while he was in his 30s.

But he and his allies have been defiant, raising money for a legal defense fund and arguing in a Tuesday press conference that he's a victim of a "political conspiracy."

Most Republicans stood by Moore as the party's nominee — the Alabama state GOP and the Republican National Committee refused calls to disavow his candidacy — and President TrumpDonald John TrumpHR McMaster says president's policy to withdraw troops from Afghanistan is 'unwise' Cast of 'Parks and Rec' reunite for virtual town hall to address Wisconsin voters Biden says Trump should step down over coronavirus response MORE not only questioned the accusation but headlined a rally on Moore's behalf in the final days of the campaign.

However, the National Republican Senatorial Campaign Committee cut its fundraising ties with Moore and its head, Sen. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerAirline job cuts loom in battleground states House approves bill to secure internet-connected federal devices against cyber threats Congress needs to finalize space weather bill as solar storms pose heightened threat MORE (R-Colo.), called on the Senate to expel him if elected.

Moore had been floated as a possible gubernatorial candidate earlier this year as Gov. Kay Ivey (R) considered running for reelection, but he ultimately did not file a candidacy.

He's previously staged two failed campaigns for governor, while winning two elections to serve as the state's chief justice of the Supreme Court.