DNC chair backing plan to cut superdelegates opposed by Dem lawmakers

DNC chair backing plan to cut superdelegates opposed by Dem lawmakers
© Greg Nash

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) appears poised to dramatically reduce the influence of superdelegates on the party's presidential nominating process despite vocal criticism from House Democrats.

CNN and Politico report that DNC Chairman Tom PerezThomas Edward PerezClinton’s top five vice presidential picks Government social programs: Triumph of hope over evidence Labor’s 'wasteful spending and mismanagement” at Workers’ Comp MORE has thrown his support behind a plan floated by American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten that would deny superdelegates a vote on the first ballot of the party's presidential nominating process, while allowing them to vote on subsequent ballots and proposed rule changes.

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The plan would likely strip superdelegates of their votes in all but a few cases, as the party rarely moves to a second ballot in the nominating process.

This week, Perez met with several Democratic members of Congress, including Reps. David PriceDavid Eugene PriceA disaster for diplomacy and the Zionist dream The Hill's Morning Report - Sanders surge triggers Dem angst House passes supplemental disaster relief for Puerto Rico MORE (N.C.), Grace MengGrace MengNew travel ban reflects Trump administration's discriminatory intent China sentences former Interpol president to more than 13 years for bribery Hillicon Valley: Progressives oppose funding bill over surveillance authority | Senators call for 5G security coordinator | Facebook gets questions over location tracking | Louisiana hit by ransomware attack MORE (N.Y.), Gregory MeeksGregory Weldon MeeksDemocratic rivals sharpen attacks as Bloomberg rises The Hill's Campaign Report: Rising Klobuchar, Buttigieg face test in diverse states Bloomberg builds momentum on Capitol Hill with new endorsements MORE (N.Y.) and Rosa DeLauroRosa Luisa DeLauroOn The Money: Deficit spikes 25 percent through January | Mnuchin declines to say why Trump pulled Treasury nominee who oversaw Roger Stone case | Lawmakers trade insults over Trump budget cuts Lawmakers trade insults over Trump budget cuts USDA takes heat as Democrats seek probe into trade aid MORE (Conn.), who pushed back against the proposal while offering their own.

However, the lawmakers' proposal was rejected due to it not meeting the Unity and Reform Commission's earlier decision to reduce the number of unpledged delegates by two-thirds, CNN reports.

Reducing the influence of superdelegates has been a charged issue for the party, supported largely by labor activists and backers of Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersNevada Democratic debate draws record-breaking 19.7 million viewers 'Where's your spoon?' What we didn't learn in the latest debate Ocasio-Cortez defends Warren against 'misogynist trope' MORE (I-Vt.). The party will vote on the proposals in August.

The Unity and Reform Commission, which was formed following the heated 2016 Democratic presidential primary, voted earlier this year to both reduce the number and role of these delegates at the party's conventions, which CNN reports could result in some members of Congress losing their status as superdelegates.

Still, House Democrats said they felt "heard" by Perez during the meeting and expressed interest in the possibility of a compromise.

“I was able to talk about some ways the twin objectives could be achieved: to significantly reduce the number of unpledged delegates, and secondly, to do that without denying or overriding anyone’s vote at the convention,” Price told Politico.

A statement from Perez's press secretary said that the DNC would ensure that any proposal adopted by the DNC would "significantly" reduce the role of unpledged delegates at the convention.

“The DNC heard concerns that members of Congress had with the current consensus and discussed how any proposal must significantly reduce the role of unpledged delegates, a commitment that the full DNC voted for in March,” DNC press secretary Michael Tyler told Politico in a statement.

“We'll continue to seek input from members of Congress who are integral to our efforts to strengthen the Democratic Party and ensure that our 2020 nominee sprints out of the gates ready to defeat Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpChasten Buttigieg: 'I've been dealing with the likes of Rush Limbaugh my entire life' Lawmakers paint different pictures of Trump's 'opportunity zone' program We must not turn our heads from the effects of traumatic brain injuries MORE.“