Political stunner! Crowley knocked off by millennial challenger

Longtime Rep. Joseph Crowley (D-N.Y.), who’s been viewed as a potential House Speaker, is projected to lose the Democratic primary, a massive upset that will shake up the political world in New York and Washington.

The Associated Press called the race around 9:50 p.m. EDT. With 88 percent of precincts reporting, Ocasio-Cortez was leading Crowley, 57.6 percent to 42.4 percent.

Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a 28-year-old organizer for Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTrump says Obama knows 'something that you don't know' about Biden The Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders exits, clearing Biden's path to nomination Former Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report MORE’s (I-Vt.) presidential campaign, defeated Crowley in his deep-blue district that encompasses northwest Queens and the eastern Bronx.

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Crowley, who’s chairman of the House Democratic caucus, is the third incumbent to lose a primary this cycle, but the first sitting Democratic member to be defeated.

This is the first time in 14 years that Crowley, 56, has faced a primary challenger. Crowley has long been seen as a potential successor to House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrip that led to acting Navy secretary's resignation cost 3K: reports Overnight Health Care: Trump steps up attack on WHO | Fauci says deaths could be lower than first projected | House panel warns federal stockpile of medical supplies depleted | Mnuchin, Schumer in talks over relief deal House Republicans, key administration officials push for additional funding for coronavirus small business loans MORE (D-Calif.). And he's been a staple in New York City politics as chairman of the Queens County Democratic Party.

Crowley congratulated Ocasio-Cortez on her primary victory, offering his support to her and took a jab at President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenators demand more details from Trump on intel watchdog firing Overnight Health Care: Trump steps up attack on WHO | Fauci says deaths could be lower than first projected | House panel warns federal stockpile of medical supplies depleted | Mnuchin, Schumer in talks over relief deal Trump says he'll look into small business loan program restricting casinos MORE. At his election night party, Crowley played Bruce Springsteen’s “Born to Run.”

“The Trump administration is a threat to everything we stand for here in Queens and the Bronx, and if we don't win back the House this November, we will lose the nation we love,” Crowley said in a statement Tuesday night.

“This is why we must come together. We will only be able to stop Donald Trump and the Republican Congress by working together, as a united Democratic Party."

Trump also weighed in on Crowley’s stunning defeat, tweeting that he was a “big Trump hater” and should have been “nice.”

Ocasio-Cortez's campaign gained significant traction when a campaign video went viral late last month. She earned high-profile endorsements from national progressive groups including Sanders-aligned Our Revolution, MoveOn.org and Justice Democrats.

Political observers have likened Ocasio-Cortez’s upset to House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric Ivan CantorThe Democrats' strategy conundrum: a 'movement' or a coalition? The biggest political upsets of the decade Bottom Line MORE’s (R-Va.) unexpected primary loss in 2014 to now-Rep. Dave Brat.

New York’s 14th District is one of the most diverse districts in the country, with Hispanics making up half of the population. Ocasio-Cortez is a first-time candidate, with a mother born in Puerto Rico and a father from the Bronx.

Ocasio-Cortez was one of several insurgent, millennial challengers to challenge entrenched Democratic incumbents in New York City on Tuesday. She ran on the need for new representation, criticizing Crowley for living outside the district. His family owns a home outside of Washington, D.C.

She was also heavily outspent by Crowley, who’s been a formidable fundraiser. The congressman spent $3.4 million, while Ocasio-Cortez spent just $200,000.

“This race is about people versus money. We’ve got people, they’ve got money,” Ocasio-Cortez said her viral campaign video.

Ocasio-Cortez scored some last-minute help from the field organizer for Democrat Ayanna Pressley, a Boston City councilor who’s running in a primary against Rep. Michael CapuanoMichael (Mike) Everett CapuanoInside the progressive hunt for vulnerable House Democrats Progressive mayor launches primary challenge to top Ways and Means Democrat Ex-GOP Rep. Roskam joins lobbying firm MORE (D-Mass.).

Crowley had scored some big endorsements from colleagues, but one lawmaker endorsement in particular riled up those in progressive circles.

Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaDemocrats eye additional relief checks for coronavirus Defense Production Act urgently needed for critical medical gear 20 House Dems call on Trump to issue two-week, nationwide shelter-in-place order MORE (D-Calif.), a progressive lawmaker who won his own primary challenge against an incumbent in 2016, initially backed Crowley. But after pressure from progressives on social media, Khanna issued a dual endorsement.

While Ocasio-Cortez is so far the only primary challenger to knock off an incumbent, other upstart candidates had strong performances.

Democrat Adem Bunkeddeko, a 30-year-old first-time candidate, is just 2 points behind Democratic Rep. Yvette ClarkeYvette Diane ClarkeOvernight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Dems 'frustrated' by coronavirus response after briefing | Mulvaney claims press covering outbreak to take Trump down | Pence bolsters task force House approves bill banning flavored tobacco products Lawmakers grill Ticketmaster, StubHub execs over online ticketing MORE, who’s been in office since 2007.

Democratic Rep. Carolyn MaloneyCarolyn Bosher MaloneyOvernight Defense: 10,000 more National Guard troops to join coronavirus fight | Democrats float bill to restore Pentagon watchdog to virus oversight panel | Afghanistan releases 100 Taliban prisoners Federal stockpile of emergency medical equipment depleted, House panel says House Democrats propose bill to let sidelined Pentagon watchdog stay on coronavirus oversight panel MORE also had her first primary challenge since 2010, but she defeated her opponent Suraj Patel, a 34-year-old hotel executive and professor. She won by double-digits, 58 percent to nearly 42 percent.