Left mounts heavy pressure campaign on swing senators over Supreme Court

Liberal groups are mounting a major offensive against President TrumpDonald TrumpMyPillow CEO to pull ads from Fox News Haaland, Native American leaders press for Indigenous land protections Simone Biles, Vince Lombardi and the courage to walk away MORE’s Supreme Court pick, hoping to pressure every Democratic senator to vote against whomever the White House nominates to succeed Justice Anthony Kennedy.

With Republicans clinging to a 50-49 voting majority given Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMeghan McCain to produce 'Don't Sweat the Small Stuff' Lifetime movie starring Heather Locklear An August ultimatum: No recess until redistricting reform is done Meghan McCain on Pelosi, McCarthy fight: 'I think they're all bad' MORE’s (R-Ariz.) battle with brain cancer, Democrats also hope to pick off two Republican votes to stall Trump’s nominee.

The biggest targets are Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiBill would honor Ginsburg, O'Connor with statues at Capitol The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - US gymnast wins all-around gold as Simone Biles cheers from the stands The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - A huge win for Biden, centrist senators MORE (Alaska) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTop Democrat: 'A lot of spin' coming from White House on infrastructure Bill would honor Ginsburg, O'Connor with statues at Capitol The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - US gymnast wins all-around gold as Simone Biles cheers from the stands MORE (Maine), two Republican women who support abortion rights.

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But the odds are long.

Murkowski and Collins backed Trump’s last pick for the court, Neil Gorsuch, even though he was seen as a likely vote against abortion rights.

In addition, a handful of Democratic senators — Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampJoe Manchin's secret Supreme Court battle could wreak havoc with Biden's 2020 agenda Effective and profitable climate solutions are within the nation's farms and forests MORE (N.D.), Joe ManchinJoe ManchinTop Democrat: 'A lot of spin' coming from White House on infrastructure An August ultimatum: No recess until redistricting reform is done Democrats say they have the votes to advance .5T budget measure MORE (W.Va.) and Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellySupreme Court battle could wreak havoc with Biden's 2020 agenda Republicans fret over divisive candidates Everybody wants Joe Manchin MORE (Ind.) ­— also backed Gorsuch and will face enormous pressure to do so again given their reelection races in states easily won by Trump in the last presidential election.

All five swing senators met with Trump at the White House Thursday in a sign of the heavy lobbying to come.

But progressive groups are hopeful that what they describe as a “multimillion-dollar” campaign on lawmakers across the country will galvanize an activated base and show senators that there would be severe political consequences for siding with Trump.

“This will be a 50-state campaign. Our members are fired up, our phones are ringing off the hook, and we are ready to fight this fight,” NARAL Pro-Choice America President Ilyse Hogue said in a Thursday conference call with reporters.

NARAL and other groups have provided no details on their specific plans, but have made it clear that they see the court fight as being a decisive battle over abortion rights.

Kennedy in a 1992 decision upheld Roe v. Wade, and his exit from the court could lead to a majority of five conservative justices opposed to abortion rights.

Hogue said the effort by groups including NARAL, Planned Parenthood, Indivisible and the National Women’s Law Center will marry a significant ad budget with heavy grass-roots organizing around the country.

There will be direct appeals to Murkowski and Collins to not vote to confirm a justice who would overturn Roe v. Wade.

Other Republicans will also hear from the left wing.

Hogue specifically called out Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerDemocrat Jacky Rosen becomes 22nd senator to back bipartisan infrastructure deal 9 Senate seats most likely to flip in 2022 On The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare MORE (R-Nev.), who is seen as the most vulnerable Senate Republican up for reelection this year. Heller is the only Senate Republican running in a state won by Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonClintons, Stacey Abrams meeting Texas Democrats Biden says Russia spreading misinformation ahead of 2022 elections Highest-ranking GOP assemblyman in WI against another audit of 2020 vote MORE in 2016.

Republicans believe the court fight will help their side in the midterm elections by firing up grass-roots conservatives.

Conservative groups are already spending heavily on their own pressure campaign, and argue that red-state Democratic senators will pay for opposing a Trump nominee.

If liberals can’t stop the GOP Senate from confirming a Trump pick, they at least hope to use the issue to drive voters to the polls this November, when Democrats believe they can win back the House majority and possibly the Senate.

Leaders of groups backing the effort are quick to highlight the success Democratic women have had in races around the country, a point underlined by this week’s upset victory in New York by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over Rep. Joseph Crowley (N.Y.) in a Democratic primary.

“We are having this vacancy in the summer when everyone is calling the year of the women — where women are rising, where they are raising their voices,” said Fatima Goss-Graves, CEO and president of the National Women’s Law Center.

“They aren’t confused about the threat that is in front of them.”