Wisconsin GOP Senate candidate rips his own parents for donations to Dems

Wisconsin GOP Senate candidate rips his own parents for donations to Dems
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Wisconsin GOP Senate candidate Kevin Nicholson slammed his own parents for making the “maximum contribution” to his Democratic opponent in a fiery editorial published by Fox News on Monday.

The hopeful who is currently embroiled in an intense primary battle for the GOP nomination accused his parents of turning “their back on me, my wife” and their grandchildren following a report from CNN earlier this year that highlighted his parents' donations to the incumbent Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinChris Murphy may oppose bipartisan health bill unless it addresses ObamaCare 'sabotage' Chris Murphy may oppose bipartisan health bill unless it addresses ObamaCare 'sabotage' Overnight Health Care: Poll finds most Americans misunderstand scope of 'Medicare for All' | Planned Parenthood chief readies for 2020 | Drugmakers' lawsuit ramps up fight with Trump MORE (D-Wis.)

“My parents have since turned their back on me, my wife, their grandchildren, and their extended family,” Nicholson, who entered the GOP primary in July 2017, wrote in the editorial.

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He pointed to his parents' donation as a “representation of the intolerance” in the Democratic Party.

“Adding to this, they decided to make the maximum contribution to my Democrat opponent in my campaign for U.S. Senate in Wisconsin, an intentional personal blow that made headlines across the country,” Nicholson said. “It was deliberate – and it is a true representation of the intolerance of a political philosophy that stands on the false platform of tolerance.”

Earlier this year, CNN reported that Nicholson’s parents maxed out their campaign contributions to Baldwin. 

Each of his parents reportedly gave $2,700 to the Wisconsin Democrat’s campaign in December, the largest amount they can give during the Democratic primary.

“I don’t enjoy talking about this highly personal experience, but as I see the #WalkAway movement gain momentum, I feel compelled to share my story,” Nicholson continued, adding that “conservatives need to reach out to those who were raised to believe in a Democrat Party and a liberal political philosophy that does nothing to make them more successful.”

“Many others who have decided to leave the Democrat Party have also likely paid a personal price for their decision,” Nicholson said further, adding that he has come to “learn” during his campaign that some establishment Republican circles have been reluctant to welcome “new members” into the party.

“Too many believe that they have a club that they control – and would like to keep it that way since it keeps them in power,” Nicholson wrote. “Those who demand that people be Republicans from birth in order to have a voice in the conservative movement would shrink, not grow our party. And their short-sighted perspective on people’s ability to mature as they experience life would keep us from bringing new Republicans into the fold, like Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpBooker hits Biden's defense of remarks about segregationist senators: 'He's better than this' Booker hits Biden's defense of remarks about segregationist senators: 'He's better than this' Trump says Democrats are handing out subpoenas 'like they're cookies' MORE has done.”

Nicholson, a Marine veteran and businessman, is currently in a tight battle with state Sen. Leah Vukmir for the GOP nomination to face off against Baldwin.

A super PAC backing Vukmir recently released a TV ad hitting Nicholson for his past as a Democrat and for his former backing of abortion rights.

Nicholson and Vukmir will square off in an Aug. 14 primary. It has been a brutal campaign with millions in outside spending flooding the state.

Vukmir has gained a number of powerful endorsements from the state’s Republican Party, including from Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanTrump says Democrats are handing out subpoenas 'like they're cookies' The unexpected shadow of 1994, 25 years later Addressing climate change is a win for Republicans — why not embrace it? MORE (R-Wis.) and former White House chief of staff Reince PriebusReinhold (Reince) Richard PriebusOvernight Defense: Inside the 3B House defense policy bill | Senators take new tack to challenge Saudi arms sales | Raytheon, United Technologies to merge Overnight Defense: Inside the 3B House defense policy bill | Senators take new tack to challenge Saudi arms sales | Raytheon, United Technologies to merge Former Trump chief of staff Reince Priebus officially joins Navy MORE.

Nicholson has been backed by a number of top conservative groups like the Club for Growth and is also backed by GOP Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSecond ex-Senate staffer charged in aiding doxxing of GOP senators Second ex-Senate staffer charged in aiding doxxing of GOP senators Overnight Defense: Shanahan exit shocks Washington | Pentagon left rudderless | Lawmakers want answers on Mideast troop deployment | Senate could vote on Saudi arms deal this week | Pompeo says Trump doesn't want war with Iran MORE (Utah) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGOP frets about Trump's poll numbers GOP frets about Trump's poll numbers GOP senator introduces bill to hold online platforms liable for political bias MORE (Texas).