Wisconsin GOP Senate candidate rips his own parents for donations to Dems

Wisconsin GOP Senate candidate rips his own parents for donations to Dems
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Wisconsin GOP Senate candidate Kevin Nicholson slammed his own parents for making the “maximum contribution” to his Democratic opponent in a fiery editorial published by Fox News on Monday.

The hopeful who is currently embroiled in an intense primary battle for the GOP nomination accused his parents of turning “their back on me, my wife” and their grandchildren following a report from CNN earlier this year that highlighted his parents' donations to the incumbent Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinKlobuchar, O'Rourke visit Wisconsin as 2020 race heats up Dems offer smaller step toward ‘Medicare for all' Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by America's 340B Hospitals — Powerful House committee turns to drug pricing | Utah governor defies voters on Medicaid expansion | Dems want answers on controversial new opioid MORE (D-Wis.)

“My parents have since turned their back on me, my wife, their grandchildren, and their extended family,” Nicholson, who entered the GOP primary in July 2017, wrote in the editorial.

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He pointed to his parents' donation as a “representation of the intolerance” in the Democratic Party.

“Adding to this, they decided to make the maximum contribution to my Democrat opponent in my campaign for U.S. Senate in Wisconsin, an intentional personal blow that made headlines across the country,” Nicholson said. “It was deliberate – and it is a true representation of the intolerance of a political philosophy that stands on the false platform of tolerance.”

Earlier this year, CNN reported that Nicholson’s parents maxed out their campaign contributions to Baldwin. 

Each of his parents reportedly gave $2,700 to the Wisconsin Democrat’s campaign in December, the largest amount they can give during the Democratic primary.

“I don’t enjoy talking about this highly personal experience, but as I see the #WalkAway movement gain momentum, I feel compelled to share my story,” Nicholson continued, adding that “conservatives need to reach out to those who were raised to believe in a Democrat Party and a liberal political philosophy that does nothing to make them more successful.”

“Many others who have decided to leave the Democrat Party have also likely paid a personal price for their decision,” Nicholson said further, adding that he has come to “learn” during his campaign that some establishment Republican circles have been reluctant to welcome “new members” into the party.

“Too many believe that they have a club that they control – and would like to keep it that way since it keeps them in power,” Nicholson wrote. “Those who demand that people be Republicans from birth in order to have a voice in the conservative movement would shrink, not grow our party. And their short-sighted perspective on people’s ability to mature as they experience life would keep us from bringing new Republicans into the fold, like Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpSchiff urges GOP colleagues to share private concerns about Trump publicly US-China trade talks draw criticism for lack of women in pictures Overnight Defense: Trump to leave 200 troops in Syria | Trump, Kim plan one-on-one meeting | Pentagon asks DHS to justify moving funds for border wall MORE has done.”

Nicholson, a Marine veteran and businessman, is currently in a tight battle with state Sen. Leah Vukmir for the GOP nomination to face off against Baldwin.

A super PAC backing Vukmir recently released a TV ad hitting Nicholson for his past as a Democrat and for his former backing of abortion rights.

Nicholson and Vukmir will square off in an Aug. 14 primary. It has been a brutal campaign with millions in outside spending flooding the state.

Vukmir has gained a number of powerful endorsements from the state’s Republican Party, including from Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanFive takeaways from McCabe’s allegations against Trump The Hill's 12:30 Report: Sanders set to shake up 2020 race McCabe: No one in 'Gang of Eight' objected to FBI probe into Trump MORE (R-Wis.) and former White House chief of staff Reince PriebusReinhold (Reince) Richard PriebusIs a presidential appointment worth the risk? Ex-White House aide says 'cartoon villain' Kellyanne Conway bad-mouthed colleagues Trump Org hires former WH ethics lawyer to deal with congressional probes MORE.

Nicholson has been backed by a number of top conservative groups like the Club for Growth and is also backed by GOP Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump escalates fight with NY Times The 10 GOP senators who may break with Trump on emergency Congress closer to forcing Trump’s hand on Saudi support MORE (Utah) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzInviting Kim Jong Un to Washington Trump endorses Cornyn for reelection as O'Rourke mulls challenge O’Rourke not ruling out being vice presidential candidate MORE (Texas).