More than 50 Dem House challengers outraise GOP incumbents

More than 50 Dem House challengers outraise GOP incumbents
© Greg Nash

More than 50 House Democratic candidates outraised Republican incumbents in the second fundraising quarter of 2018, showing continued enthusiasm on the left ahead of midterm elections this year.

The number of Democratic challengers outraising Republican incumbents marked a record for this cycle, surpassing the more than 40 Democratic candidates who had attracted more funds than Republicans in the previous fundraising quarter, according to newly filed fundraising reports analyzed by The Hill.

Twenty-one Democrats raised more than $1 million each between April and June.

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The Democrats who outraised GOP incumbents largely hail from California, Texas, New York, New Jersey and Ohio — all states with top swing seats that will be critical for Democrats to win in order to take back the House in November. The party needs to flip a net of 23 seats to regain the House majority.

California is in the lead, with eight Democrats who brought in more than Republican incumbents, five of whom are running for seats representing districts that Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDemocrats worry they don't have right candidate to beat Trump Krystal Ball credits Gabbard's upswing in 2020 race to 'feckless' Democratic establishment Outsider candidates outpoll insider candidates MORE won in 2016.

Texas follows with six Democratic candidates outraising Republicans, including three running for seats in districts that Clinton won and three who are in more solidly GOP districts.

Among Texas Democrats outraising Republican rivals was Democrat MJ Hegar, who’s running against GOP Rep. John CarterJohn Rice CarterAmerica's workers and small business owners need the SECURE Act Cornyn faces toughest race yet in changing Texas Texas Republicans sound alarm about rapidly evolving state MORE and grabbed national headlines after her viral campaign ad in late June detailed her life as an Air Force pilot and working mother in Texas.

She raised $1.1 million in the second fundraising quarter and has $300,000 more cash on hand than Carter, who’s been in office since 2003. But she faces an uphill battle in unseating Carter, who represents a district President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump faces high stakes in meeting with Erdoğan amid impeachment drama Democrats worry they don't have right candidate to beat Trump Trump threatening to fire Mulvaney: report MORE won by nearly 13 points in 2016.

By comparison, just one Republican challenger outraised a Democratic incumbent, with John Chrin raising $50,000 more than Rep. Matt CartwrightMatthew (Matt) Alton CartwrightPETA asks DOJ to stop conducting training that harms animals Lawmakers express concern to DOJ over training involving 'stabbing, burning and shooting' animals Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress MORE (D-Pa.), though Cartwright still has a cash-on-hand advantage.

Cartwright’s district became more favorable for Republicans after the Pennsylvania Supreme Court redrew the state’s congressional map in its gerrymandering case, but Cook Political Report still rates his seat as likely Democratic.

Still, most GOP incumbents continue to hold cash advantages over their Democratic challengers, with 14 Democratic candidates having more in the bank than Republican incumbents.

In open-seat races, Democratic challengers outraised their Republican opponents in 25 races.

In Ohio’s special election for ex-Rep. Pat TiberiPatrick (Pat) Joseph TiberiOhio New Members 2019 Many authors of GOP tax law will not be returning to Congress GOP Rep. Balderson holds onto seat in Ohio MORE’s (R-Ohio) seat, Democrat Danny O'Connor narrowly outraised Republican Troy Balderson, though he has the edge in cash on hand.

Democrats are hoping that O’Connor can mobilize moderate voters — and supporters of Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R) — to help them in the reliably red district. Cook Political Report rates the special election as a toss-up.

In two other top California races, Democrats Gil Cisneros and Mike Levin outpaced their GOP rivals in the seats being vacated by retiring GOP Reps. Ed RoyceEdward (Ed) Randall RoyceMystery surrounds elusive sanctions on Russia Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers struggle to understand Facebook's Libra project | EU hits Amazon with antitrust probe | New cybersecurity concerns over census | Robocall, election security bills head to House floor | Privacy questions over FaceApp House panel advances bill to protect elections from foreign interference MORE and Darrell IssaDarrell Edward IssaWhy the GOP march of mad hatters poses a threat to our Democracy Elijah Cummings, native son of Baltimore, gets emotional send-off from Democratic luminaries Lawmakers come together to honor Cummings: 'One of the greats in our country's history' MORE, respectively.

And in West Virginia, Richard Ojeda, the Democrat who voted for Trump in 2016 and has the backing of national Democrats, outpaced Republican Carol Miller in the race to replace Rep. Evan JenkinsEvan Hollin JenkinsWest Virginia New Members 2019 Republican Carol Miller holds off Democrat in West Virginia House race Trump to fundraise for 3 Republicans running for open seats: report MORE (R-W.Va.). Still, that’ll be a steep climb for Democrats since Trump carried the district by a whopping 50 points.

Meanwhile, Republicans outraised Democratic challengers in five open seats, including in the race to replace Rep. Rick NolanRichard (Rick) Michael NolanHold off on anti-mining hysteria until the facts are in Minnesota New Members 2019 Republicans pick up seat in Minnesota’s ‘Iron range’ MORE (D-Minn.), which remains one of Republicans’ best pick-up opportunities this cycle.

In that race, Republican Pete Stauber outraised Democrats Joe Radinovich and Jason Metsa — the two top Democratic fundraisers. Stauber also has more cash on hand. Minnesota has a huge House battlefield this cycle, with a handful of top races.

And in the key open-seat race to succeed retiring Rep. Dave ReichertDavid (Dave) George ReichertLymphedema Treatment Act would provide a commonsense solution to a fixable problem Yoder, Messer land on K Street Ex-GOP lawmaker from Washington joins lobbying firm MORE (R-Wash.), Republican Dino Rossi raised more than his three top Democratic fundraisers. Both parties have their eyes on this seat, which is rated by Cook as a toss-up and was carried by Clinton by 3 points.

Ben Kamisar contributed.