Steyer group launching $250,000 digital ad campaign targeting millennials

Steyer group launching $250,000 digital ad campaign targeting millennials
© Greg Nash

Democratic mega-donor Tom Steyer’s group NextGen America is set to launch a new round of digital ads on Monday targeting millennial voters in seven competitive GOP-held districts.

The initial $250,000 ad campaign will specifically target GOP Reps. Jeff DenhamJeffrey (Jeff) John DenhamTrump attacks Dems on farm bill House Republicans push for vote on Violence Against Women Act Steyer group launching 0,000 digital ad campaign targeting millennials MORE (Calif.), Steve Knight (Calif.), Mimi Walters (Calif.), Dana RohrabacherDana Tyrone RohrabacherGOP lawmaker makes light of Kavanaugh allegation: 'Give me a break' Election Countdown: Trump confident about midterms in Hill.TV interview | Kavanaugh controversy tests candidates | Sanders, Warren ponder if both can run | Super PACs spending big | Two states open general election voting Friday | Latest Senate polls Overnight Energy: Watchdog to investigate EPA over Hurricane Harvey | Panel asks GAO to expand probe into sexual harassment in science | States sue over methane rules rollback MORE (Calif.), Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickSinema, Fitzpatrick call for long-term extension of Violence Against Women Act Dems seek to rebuild blue wall in Rust Belt contests Congress prepares to punt biggest political battles until after midterms MORE (Pa.) and Dave Brat (Va.) for voting in line with President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: Dems playing destructive 'con game' with Kavanaugh Several Yale Law classmates who backed Kavanaugh call for misconduct investigation Freedom Caucus calls on Rosenstein to testify or resign MORE’s agenda.

The end of each ad encourages young people to register to vote before November.

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“This is our local representative. He’s supposed to represent us in Congress, but instead he votes for what Trump wants over 80 percent of the time,” one ads says, targeting Rohrabacher.

“For example, he voted to take away health care and stood by while his own party put immigrant kids in cages,” the ad continues, referencing Rohrabacher’s vote to repeal ObamaCare and the Trump administration’s policy of separating families caught illegally crossing the border, which has now been halted.

NextGen will also unveil an adtitled “Chopping Block,” that will run in Fitzpatrick's and Brat’s districts, as well as in the district being vacated by retiring Rep. Ed RoyceEdward (Ed) Randall RoyceOvernight Defense: Latest on Korea talks | Trump says summit results 'very exciting!' | Congress to get Space Force plan in February | Trump asked CIA about silent bombs Poll: House GOP candidate leads in California swing district Overnight Defense: Congress reaches deal preventing shutdown | Pentagon poised to be funded on time for first time in years | House GOP rejects effort to get Putin summit documents MORE (R-Calif.). The ad features someone smashing objects with a hammer and accusing Republicans in Congress of wanting to take away the Affordable Care Act, equal pay for women and LGBT rights.

NextGen says the ads are expected to reach 220,000 voters between the ages of 18 to 35 in all seven districts. The ads will run on various social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Snapchat.

Democrats are heavily targeting all seven seats as they look to flip 23 seats and take back the House. With the exception of Brat’s seat, Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSenate panel subpoenas Roger Stone associate for Russia probe Webb: The new mob: Anti-American Dems Clinton to hold fundraiser for Menendez in NJ next month MORE won all of those districts being targeted in the 2016 presidential election.

Steyer, who’s also been leading the Need to Impeach campaign, announced on Monday an additional $10 million for a voter outreach program ahead of the November midterms. The billionaire donor and environmental activist told Politico last month that he plans to spend at least $110 million in 2018.