DNC to confront fate of superdelegates after bitter 2016 fight

DNC to confront fate of superdelegates after bitter 2016 fight

Members of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) are gearing up for a potentially bitter fight this weekend over the role of superdelegates in their presidential nominating process.

DNC Chairman Tom PerezThomas Edward PerezClinton’s top five vice presidential picks Government social programs: Triumph of hope over evidence Labor’s 'wasteful spending and mismanagement” at Workers’ Comp MORE is pushing a proposal at the party’s summer meeting in Chicago that seeks to reduce the influence of superdelegates in the Democratic presidential nomination process by preventing them from voting in the first ballot. But they would get to vote in the rare event that a second round of voting is required to choose a nominee. 

Perez is likely to have the votes to pass the proposal, but opponents, including members of the Congressional Black Caucus, are mobilizing, arguing that it would disenfranchise some of the party’s most prominent members, like lawmakers, former presidents and other powerful Democratic leaders.

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The battle threatens to reawaken the divisions sowed by the 2016 Democratic nominating process, when superdelegates overwhelmingly backed Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSenate panel subpoenas Roger Stone associate for Russia probe Webb: The new mob: Anti-American Dems Clinton to hold fundraiser for Menendez in NJ next month MORE as the party's nominee over Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersPoll: Gillum leads DeSantis by 5 points in Florida governor race Sanders: Kavanaugh accusers 'have risked their lives to come forward' Helping citizens unite in post-Citizens United America MORE (I-Vt.).

The debate comes roughly two years before Democrats convene to nominate their 2020 presidential candidate — with the party expecting a crowded field of potential contenders ranging from former Vice President Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenKavanaugh needs to be more 'animated' during hearing, says former Clarence Thomas advisor The Hill's Morning Report — Trump backs Kavanaugh, puts Rosenstein in limbo Saving the transatlantic partnership MORE to Sanders himself.

Sanders and his supporters have accused the DNC of running a rigged nomination process intended to snuff out candidates whose views don't jibe with those of the Democratic establishment.

Still, the proposal to limit the role of superdelegates — officially called unpledged delegates — has won the support of many party leaders and dignitaries, including two former DNC chairs, Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineDem lawmaker trolls Trump over reception of UN speech Trump: Boasting line in UN speech was 'meant to get some laughter' Kaine mocks Trump over UN laughter, resurfaces old tweet calling Obama a 'laughing stock' MORE (D-Va.) and former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean (D).

House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiHillicon Valley: State officials share tech privacy concerns with Sessions | Senator says election security bill won't pass before midterms | Instagram co-founders leave Facebook | Google chief to meet GOP lawmakers over bias claims Collins defends ad showing opponent speaking Korean against claims of bigotry Hoyer questions feasibility of new threshold for Speaker nomination MORE (D-Calif.) had previously criticized the role of superdelegates in the nomination system.

Proponents of the reform effort see it as a way to help mend the intraparty divisions that emerged following the 2016 primary season. The measure sailed through the DNC’s Rules and Bylaws Committee last month, sending it to a final vote by the full committee, which is set for Saturday.

“There is a strongly held view among millions that the so-called superdelegates play an oversized role in the party, and it’s undeniably hindering our ability to move forward to bring the party together,” Perez told The Baltimore Sun in a recent interview.

Unlike pledged delegates, whose votes at the convention are determined by state primary and caucus results, Democratic superdelegates are free to vote as they see fit.

In 2016, there were more than 700 superdelegates out of the 4,763 total delegates at the Democratic National Convention, meaning that they accounted for nearly a third of the 2,383 delegates needed to win the party’s presidential nomination.

That prompted complaints from Sanders and his supporters that the senator's odds of winning the Democratic nomination were stacked against him.

Clinton came up just short of the 2,383 needed to secure the nomination, but her support among superdelegates ultimately pushed her over the threshold.

Terje Anderson, the chair of the Vermont Democratic Party and a DNC member, supports the measure to reform the role of superdelegates.

He said that they have been a periodic point of contention within the party since the system came into being in 1984, and that doing away with them would help ease tensions in the party.

“Ever since we’ve created them, they’ve been a point of contention at times,” Anderson said by phone Thursday. “It’s going to keep happening as long as we allow it.”

Anderson said that he expects the full DNC to easily approve the proposal when it comes up for a vote on Saturday.

Some DNC members have sought in recent weeks to rally opposition to the proposed rule change. Bob Mulholland, a DNC member from California and a superdelegate himself, said that he and others had been reaching out to superdelegates about the proposal.

Mulholland blamed Sanders for forcing the superdelegate issue, saying that the Vermont senator, a self-described democratic socialist, wielded outsize influence in the DNC, despite the fact that he is not even a party member.

“We’ve had members of Congress vote [on the first ballot] for almost 40 years. Everyone who has competed and lost, none of them said we should stop superdelegates from voting,” he told The Hill, noting that the last time the nominating process went to a second ballot was 1952.

“This is just Bernie Sanders,” he added.

Mulholland said that Perez had faced pressure from Sanders and his supporters to back the proposed superdelegate reform.

“He, all of a sudden, is a big poker player at the DNC,” he said of the Vermont senator.

In a letter to Perez earlier this month, Rep. Cedric RichmondCedric Levon RichmondState Department: Allegations of racism 'disgusting and false' Congressional Black Caucus says Kavanaugh would weaken Voting Rights Act protections Democrats move to limit role of superdelegates in presidential nominations MORE (D-La.), the chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, argued that reducing the role of superdelegates in choosing the Democratic Party’s 2020 presidential nominee would create friction with their constituents.

“Passage of the reforms in their current form would disenfranchise elected officials for no substantive reason and would create unnecessary competition between those elected and their constituents,” Richmond wrote.