Avenatti launches his own PAC as he considers presidential run

Avenatti launches his own PAC as he considers presidential run
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Michael Avenatti, the lawyer representing adult-film actress Stormy Daniels in her lawsuit against President TrumpDonald John TrumpFacebook releases audit on conservative bias claims Harry Reid: 'Decriminalizing border crossings is not something that should be at the top of the list' Recessions happen when presidents overlook key problems MORE, is launching his own political action committee (PAC) as he mulls a possible presidential run.

Avenatti told BuzzFeed in an interview that the PAC, called Fight PAC, will support Democratic candidates with “the size and the presence to really fight back and advocate from a position of strength as opposed to weakness.”

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The lawyer said that he will start issuing endorsements in the coming weeks.

Avenatti did not immediately return a request for comment from The Hill.

“Looking forward to helping Dems take back the House and beyond in 2018. Too much is at stake. Go to http://www.thefightpac.org,” he tweeted Friday. 

Avenatti told BuzzFeed that the PAC will not accept corporate contributions, an increasingly popular stance among Democrats who weigh presidential runs, and said it will support his travels to key states.

The lawyer has already traveled to Florida, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Iowa and Ohio – all crucial states for a successful presidential campaign. Avenatti has also released a litany of policy positions, many of which align with the progressive wing of the Democratic Party.

The name of the lawyer’s PAC matches his rhetoric since he announced he’s considering a run.

“When they go low, I say, we hit harder," he told a group of Iowa Democrats earlier this month.

He’s also pushed back on questions over his political experience, citing his early work for many Democratic campaigns and saying the only qualification should be a candidate’s ability to defeat Trump in 2020.

“I think that if the Democratic Party focuses on nominating who will make the best president, that’s going to be a critical mistake,” Avenatti told NBC News while in Iowa. “There’s only one question at the end of the day, and that question is: Can the potential nominee beat Donald Trump?”