DNC planning presidential primary TV debates for 2019: report

DNC planning presidential primary TV debates for 2019: report
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The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is in the "very early stages" of planning for a series of televised debates in 2019, a party official said Saturday.

The Associated Press reports that a DNC official says the party is planning for several debates to occur months before the first primary states of Iowa and New Hampshire vote.

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The move, directed by DNC Chairman Tom PerezThomas Edward PerezClinton’s top five vice presidential picks Government social programs: Triumph of hope over evidence Labor’s 'wasteful spending and mismanagement” at Workers’ Comp MORE, is meant to allow the party to effectively choose from a field of candidates that the AP reports could range as high as two dozen.

“The DNC’s goal is to have a debate process that is transparent, fair, impartial and inclusive,” senior party adviser Mary Beth Cahill told the AP.

Vice Chairman Michael Blake added to the news service that the party is studying the 2016 Republican Party primary for lessons to be learned about winnowing down a large field of candidates without appearing to play favorites.

“It’s hard with that many,” Blake told the AP. “Are we starting to talk about it and think about it? Yes. Are we anywhere close to resolved? No.”

The first Democratic primary debate of the 2016 election cycle was held in October 2015. During the primary, then-DNC Chairwoman Rep. Debbie Wasserman SchultzDeborah (Debbie) Wasserman SchultzWasserman Schultz: 'We need a President, not a comic book villain' Lawmakers join musical stars to celebrate Grammys on the Hill Dem lawmakers will attempt tour of detention facility they say turned them away MORE (D-Fla.) was criticized by supporters of Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersCory Booker has a problem in 2020: Kamala Harris Wage growth shaping up as key 2020 factor for Trump Booker to supporter who wanted him to punch Trump: 'Black guys like us, we don't get away with that' MORE (I-Vt.) for appearing to favor Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThorny part of obstruction of justice is proving intent, that's a job for Congress Nadler: I don't understand why Mueller didn't charge Donald Trump Jr., others in Trump Tower meeting Kellyanne Conway: Mueller didn't need to use the word 'exoneration' in report MORE in the contest, and debate timing was scrutinized for the appearance of favoritism.

Wasserman Schultz eventually resigned as DNC chair just before the Democratic National Convention in 2016.

A large field of lesser-known Democratic candidates is expected in the 2020 election cycle, and prominent members of the party including Sanders, Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandCory Booker has a problem in 2020: Kamala Harris Booker to supporter who wanted him to punch Trump: 'Black guys like us, we don't get away with that' 2020 Dems ratchet up anti-corporate talk in bid to woo unions MORE (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTim Ryan doesn't back impeachment proceedings against Trump Schiff: Democrats 'may' take up impeachment proceedings Trump claims Democrats' plans to probe admin will cost them 'big time' in 2020 MORE (D-Mass.) are all thought to be considering runs for president.

The DNC is set to vote on proposals this weekend at the party's summer meeting, including on a proposal supported by Perez to vastly reduce the influence of superdelegates in the party.