DNC chairman: Superdelegates ‘never decided who won the nomination’

DNC chairman: Superdelegates ‘never decided who won the nomination’
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Democratic National Committee (DNC) Chairman Tom PerezThomas Edward PerezClinton’s top five vice presidential picks Government social programs: Triumph of hope over evidence Labor’s 'wasteful spending and mismanagement” at Workers’ Comp MORE on Tuesday said that superdelegates have "never decided who won the nomination," days after the DNC voted to limit the role of superdelegates in choosing the party's presidential nominee.

The DNC head added that "while superdelegates haven't decided who won the nomination, they've affected peoples' sense of" fairness.

The DNC voted overwhelmingly on Saturday to limit the role of superdelegates — unpledged delegates to the DNC who choose for themselves for whom they vote — and not allow them to vote during the first ballot of the nominating process.

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Perez says superdelegates have not determined the nominee before, but the DNC needs to be "fair in fact and fair in perception."

"Superdelegates have been in place since 1984," Perez said on CNN's "New Day." "They’ve never decided who won the nomination." 

"[Former Democratic presidential nominee] Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSusan Rice sees stock rise in Biden VP race Democrats try to turn now into November The Memo: Unhappy voters could deliver political shocks beyond Trump MORE won the nomination in 2016 because she got more votes than her opponents," he said. "Same thing with [former President] Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaSunday shows preview: Lawmakers to address alarming spike in coronavirus cases History will judge America by how well we truly make Black lives matter What July 4 means for November 3 MORE in 2008. The fact of the matter is, while superdelegates haven’t decided who won the nomination, they’ve affected peoples’ sense of the fairness of the process." 

"What our goal is is to make sure the process is fair to everyone," Perez added. "Fair in fact and fair in perception."