Former HHS Secretary Donna Shalala wins Democratic House primary in Florida

Former HHS Secretary Donna Shalala wins Democratic House primary in Florida
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Democrat Donna Shalala, a Health and Human Services (HHS) secretary under former President Clinton and a longtime educator, won her House primary on Tuesday.

Shalala emerged from a crowded Democratic primary in Florida's 27th District with 32 percent of the vote, The Associated Press projected with 95 percent of precincts reporting. 

The former Clinton official will face off against Republican Maria Elvira Salazar in the race to replace retiring Rep. Ileana Ros-LehtinenIleana Carmen Ros-LehtinenCook moves status of 6 House races as general election sprint begins The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by Better Medicare Alliance — Cuomo wins and Manafort plea deal Trump's Puerto Rico tweets spark backlash MORE (R-Fla.) in November.

Shalala, who served as HHS secretary over the entire eight years of Clinton's tenure, was long considered the front-runner for the Democratic nomination. But she faced opponents, including Florida state Rep. David Richardson, who campaigned as a progressive and attacked Shalala from the left.

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 Another Democrat in the race, former Knight Foundation program director Matt Haggman, went after Shalala for her years of experience in Washington, insisting that it was time for new leadership.

After leaving Clinton's administration in 2001, Shalala served as the president of the University of Miami for 14 years.

Ros-Lehtinen’s planned retirement has bolstered Democratic hopes in Florida’s 27th District. Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonFive takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's fiery first debate Heller embraces Trump in risky attempt to survive in November Live coverage: Cruz, O'Rourke clash in Texas debate MORE beat President TrumpDonald John TrumpHannity urges Trump not to fire 'anybody' after Rosenstein report Ben Carson appears to tie allegation against Kavanaugh to socialist plot Five takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's fiery first debate MORE there by nearly 20 points in 2016, making it a key target for Democrats as they seek to retake control of the House in November.

The Cook Political Report currently rates the race as "lean Democratic."

Shalala will face Salazar, a longtime broadcast journalist, who was urged to run for the seat by Ros-Lehtinen when she decided to retire after serving in the chamber for nearly 30 years.

Over the course of her 35-year broadcast career, Salazar snagged interviews with the late Cuban leader Fidel Castro and the late Chilean leader Augusto Pinochet. She overcame a crowded field of Republican challengers to secure her party’s nomination.