Trump calls North Carolina redistricting ruling ‘unfair’

President TrumpDonald John TrumpGraham: America must 'accept the pain that comes in standing up to China' Weld 'thrilled' more Republicans are challenging Trump New data challenges Trump's economic narrative MORE on Friday tore into a court's ruling this week that struck down the state's GOP-drawn redistricting map as an unconstitutional gerrymander, suggesting that "there has to be something going on."

“How unfair is that?” Trump said during a speech at a GOP fundraising event in Charlotte, N.C., attended by several Republican members of Congress, according to White House pool reports.

“No, it’s very unfair to have an election in less than 60 days and they change the district on you? And you’ve already won primaries? How does that work?" Trump continued.

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"You’ve all gone through primaries — or some of you have — and it’s been districted for years, and now you have to redraw lines to have a new district? Even though you won a primary in another district? I don’t know. There has to be something going on.”

Trump's comments came after a three-judge panel in North Carolina on Monday struck down the state's GOP-drawn map for the second time this year, saying Republicans had redrawn the map to unconstitutionally favor their party.

The U.S. District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina reached the same conclusion in January, with the case eventually making its way to the Supreme Court. Justices on the high court sent the case back down to the lower court to examine whether plaintiffs had standing to sue.

Judge James Wynn said partisan gerrymanders “raise the specter that the Government may effectively drive certain ideas or viewpoints from the marketplace” because they “intentionally seek to entrench a favored party in power and make it difficult — if not impossible — for candidates of parties supporting disfavored viewpoints to prevail.”

“That is precisely what the Republican-controlled North Carolina General Assembly sought to do here,” he wrote in the majority opinion, which Judge William Earl Britt joined.

Trump's comments Friday came as he addressed a crowd of about 300 people at a country club in Charlotte on behalf of North Carolina GOP Reps. Ted BuddTheodore (Ted) Paul BuddHouse conservatives call for ethics probe into Joaquin Castro tweet Conservatives call on Pelosi to cancel August recess Conservatives ask Barr to lay out Trump's rationale for census question MORE and Mark Harris, according to The Associated Press. The National Republican Congressional Committee said the event was expected to raise $750,000, the AP reported.

The GOP fundraiser was attended by multiple North Carolina Republican lawmakers, including Reps. Virginia FoxxVirginia Ann Foxx58 GOP lawmakers vote against disaster aid bill The GOP's commitment to electing talented women can help party retake the House When disaster relief hurts MORE, Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsRepublicans suffer whiplash from Trump's erratic week Trump knocks news of CNN hiring ex-FBI official McCabe Ben Shapiro: No prominent GOP figure ever questioned Obama's legitimacy MORE, Richard HudsonRichard Lane HudsonGOP memo deflects some gun questions to 'violence from the left' Thirty-four GOP members buck Trump on disaster bill Two killed in shooting at University of North Carolina Charlotte MORE and Patrick McHenryPatrick Timothy McHenryHillicon Valley: Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract | FTC weighs updating kids' internet privacy rules | Schumer calls for FaceApp probe | Report says states need more money to secure elections Maxine Waters says her committee will call in Zuckerberg to testify about Libra House asks Facebook: 'What is Libra?' MORE along with Harris and Budd, according to the White House. Rep. Joe WilsonAddison (Joe) Graves WilsonCities are the future: We need to coordinate their international diplomacy House Problem Solvers are bringing real change to Congress 75 years after D-Day: Service over self MORE (R-S.C.) also attended.

The federal judges in North Carolina have floated the possibility of drawing new congressional maps by mid-September, weeks before the November midterms, though Republicans have objected to such a plan.

GOP lawmakers have warned of "unmitigated chaos" and "irreparable voter confusion" in North Carolina after the court's ruling Monday, saying they will appeal to the Supreme Court to overturn the federal ruling.