McConnell suggests he could hold Senate in session through October

McConnell suggests he could hold Senate in session through October
© Anna Moneymaker

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocrats press FBI, DHS on response to white supremacist violence The Hill's 12:30 Report: Democratic field narrows with Inslee exit McConnell rejects Democrats' 'radical movement' to abolish filibuster MORE (R-Ky.) suggested Friday that he could keep lawmakers in Washington until the end of October if Democrats seek to slow or block the confirmation of President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch To ward off recession, Trump should keep his mouth and smartphone shut Trump: 'Who is our bigger enemy,' Fed chief or Chinese leader? MORE's judicial nominees.

McConnell said the Senate would soon wrap up some of its major to-do items, like funding the government and confirming Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.
 
But he hinted that it would be up to Democrats to strike a deal on nominations if they want to leave town before the end of October.
 
"Our friends on the other side who have a number of incumbents running for reelection this year are going to want to ... recess," McConnell said at the Values Voter Summit, an annual gathering of conservatives in Washington. 
 
"It won’t surprise you that I’m making my list and checking it twice," McConnell said. "That, my friends, is how we’re dealing with obstruction."

If McConnell were to hold the Senate in session at the end of October, it could keep more than two dozen Democrats who are defending their seats this year off the campaign trail in the final days before voters head to the polls.

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The Kentucky Republican's suggestion comes after he canceled most of the chamber's August recess, holding senators back from hitting the campaign trail. 

Democrats are defending far more seats than Republicans this year, including 10 in states won by President Trump in 2016. 

But the move could keep some Republicans from heading back to their states ahead of the elections.

Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerThis week: Barr back in hot seat over Mueller report Trump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary MORE (R-Nev.) is considered among the most vulnerable incumbents up for reelection this year, and Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzIs this any way for NASA to build a lunar lander? GOP strategist predicts Biden will win nomination, cites fundraising strength 3 real problems Republicans need to address to win in 2020 MORE (R-Texas) is facing an increasingly close race against Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates ABC unveils moderators for third Democratic debate The Hill's Morning Report - Trump hews to NRA on guns and eyes lower taxes MORE (D-Texas).