Sherrod Brown says he's 'not actively considering' running for president

Sherrod Brown says he's 'not actively considering' running for president
© Greg Nash

Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownFacebook's new cryptocurrency raises red flags for critics Facebook's new cryptocurrency raises red flags for critics Hillicon Valley: Senate sets hearing on Facebook's cryptocurrency plans | FTC reportedly investigating YouTube over children's privacy | GOP senator riles tech with bill targeting liability shield | FAA pushed to approve drone deliveries MORE (D-Ohio) said that he's not "actively considering" a run for the White House in 2020, though he said he thinks "about it from time to time."

"I'm not actively considering it," he said when asked about it during an interview earlier this week with the Cincinnati Enquirer's editorial board.

But he also acknowledged hearing about it "more and more."

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"I don’t have the great desire to be president like a lot of my colleagues do," Brown said. 

"I think about it from time to time," he added, "but I'm not close to wanting to do that." 

Brown is among a handful of Democrats floated as possible 2020 challengers to President TrumpDonald John TrumpBooker hits Biden's defense of remarks about segregationist senators: 'He's better than this' Booker hits Biden's defense of remarks about segregationist senators: 'He's better than this' Trump says Democrats are handing out subpoenas 'like they're cookies' MORE.

The two-term senator is up for reelection this year, but most polls show him with a comfortable lead over his Republican challenger, Rep. Jim RenacciJames (Jim) B. RenacciGOP rep: If Mueller had found collusion, 'investigation would have wrapped up very quickly' House Ethics Committee extends probe into Renacci Sherrod Brown says he has 'no real timetable' for deciding on 2020 presidential run MORE

Trump beat out Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDemocrats bristle as Hicks appears for daylong Capitol Hill testimony Democrats bristle as Hicks appears for daylong Capitol Hill testimony Trump: 'So sad' Democrats are putting Hope Hicks 'through hell' MORE in Ohio in 2016, including in 17 counties that Brown won in his 2012 reelection bid.

Brown was once a potential pick to serve as Clinton's running mate. She ultimately chose Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineOvernight Defense: Shanahan exit shocks Washington | Pentagon left rudderless | Lawmakers want answers on Mideast troop deployment | Senate could vote on Saudi arms deal this week | Pompeo says Trump doesn't want war with Iran Senators demand Trump explain decision to deploy troops amid Iran tensions Senators demand Trump explain decision to deploy troops amid Iran tensions MORE (D-Va.) in part because Democrats did not want to run the risk of losing Brown's Senate seat. 

Democrats are hoping that gubernatorial candidate Richard CordrayRichard Adams CordrayWatchdog agency must pick a side: Consumers or scammers Watchdog agency must pick a side: Consumers or scammers Kraninger's CFPB gives consumers the tools to help themselves MORE, the former director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, can help the party retake the governor's mansion in Ohio this year.

That would mean that a Democrat would likely be appointed to fill Brown's seat should he mount a bid for president in 2020.

The gubernatorial race, however, remains close. A Politico–AARP poll released earlier this month shows Republican Mike DeWine leading Cordray by only 1 point in the race for the governor's mansion.