Sherrod Brown says he's 'not actively considering' running for president

Sherrod Brown says he's 'not actively considering' running for president
© Greg Nash

Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownBipartisan housing finance reform on the road less taken Hillicon Valley: Google to promote original reporting | Senators demand answers from Amazon on worker treatment | Lawmakers weigh response to ransomware attacks Senate Democrats want answers on 'dangerous' Amazon delivery system MORE (D-Ohio) said that he's not "actively considering" a run for the White House in 2020, though he said he thinks "about it from time to time."

"I'm not actively considering it," he said when asked about it during an interview earlier this week with the Cincinnati Enquirer's editorial board.

But he also acknowledged hearing about it "more and more."

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"I don’t have the great desire to be president like a lot of my colleagues do," Brown said. 

"I think about it from time to time," he added, "but I'm not close to wanting to do that." 

Brown is among a handful of Democrats floated as possible 2020 challengers to President TrumpDonald John TrumpAlaska Republican Party cancels 2020 primary Ukrainian official denies Trump pressured president Trump goes after New York Times, Washington Post: 'They have gone totally CRAZY!!!!' MORE.

The two-term senator is up for reelection this year, but most polls show him with a comfortable lead over his Republican challenger, Rep. Jim RenacciJames (Jim) B. RenacciMedicare for All won't deliver what Democrats promise GOP rep: If Mueller had found collusion, 'investigation would have wrapped up very quickly' House Ethics Committee extends probe into Renacci MORE

Trump beat out Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonUkrainian official denies Trump pressured president The Memo: 'Whistleblower' furor gains steam Missing piece to the Ukraine puzzle: State Department's overture to Rudy Giuliani MORE in Ohio in 2016, including in 17 counties that Brown won in his 2012 reelection bid.

Brown was once a potential pick to serve as Clinton's running mate. She ultimately chose Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineDemocrats hit Scalia over LGBTQ rights Missouri Republican wins annual craft brewing competition for lawmakers Sen. Kaine: No reason for US to 'engage in military action to protect Saudi oil' MORE (D-Va.) in part because Democrats did not want to run the risk of losing Brown's Senate seat. 

Democrats are hoping that gubernatorial candidate Richard CordrayRichard Adams CordrayTrump administration asks Supreme Court to take up challenge to consumer bureau Watchdog agency must pick a side: Consumers or scammers Kraninger's CFPB gives consumers the tools to help themselves MORE, the former director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, can help the party retake the governor's mansion in Ohio this year.

That would mean that a Democrat would likely be appointed to fill Brown's seat should he mount a bid for president in 2020.

The gubernatorial race, however, remains close. A Politico–AARP poll released earlier this month shows Republican Mike DeWine leading Cordray by only 1 point in the race for the governor's mansion.