Sherrod Brown says he's 'not actively considering' running for president

Sherrod Brown says he's 'not actively considering' running for president
© Greg Nash

Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownSunday shows — New impeachment phase dominates Brown confirms he won't enter 2020 race: 'I think it's a good field' GM officially sells Ohio plant, months after Trump touted sale MORE (D-Ohio) said that he's not "actively considering" a run for the White House in 2020, though he said he thinks "about it from time to time."

"I'm not actively considering it," he said when asked about it during an interview earlier this week with the Cincinnati Enquirer's editorial board.

But he also acknowledged hearing about it "more and more."

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"I don’t have the great desire to be president like a lot of my colleagues do," Brown said. 

"I think about it from time to time," he added, "but I'm not close to wanting to do that." 

Brown is among a handful of Democrats floated as possible 2020 challengers to President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP senators balk at lengthy impeachment trial Warren goes local in race to build 2020 movement 2020 Democrats make play for veterans' votes MORE.

The two-term senator is up for reelection this year, but most polls show him with a comfortable lead over his Republican challenger, Rep. Jim RenacciJames (Jim) B. RenacciDemocrats fear Ohio slipping further away in 2020 Medicare for All won't deliver what Democrats promise GOP rep: If Mueller had found collusion, 'investigation would have wrapped up very quickly' MORE

Trump beat out Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham Clinton2020 Democrats make play for veterans' votes The Memo: Democrats confront prospect of long primary Manafort sought to hurt Clinton 2016 campaign efforts in key states: NYT MORE in Ohio in 2016, including in 17 counties that Brown won in his 2012 reelection bid.

Brown was once a potential pick to serve as Clinton's running mate. She ultimately chose Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineOvernight Health Care: Trump officials making changes to drug pricing proposal | House panel advances flavored e-cig ban | Senators press FDA tobacco chief on vaping ban Senators press FDA tobacco chief on status of vaping ban Progressive freshmen jump into leadership PAC fundraising MORE (D-Va.) in part because Democrats did not want to run the risk of losing Brown's Senate seat. 

Democrats are hoping that gubernatorial candidate Richard CordrayRichard Adams CordrayDemocrats jump into Trump turf war over student loans Supreme Court agrees to hear challenge to consumer agency On The Money: Tax, loan documents for Trump properties reportedly showed inconsistencies | Tensions flare as Dems hammer Trump consumer chief | Critics pounce as Facebook crypto project stumbles MORE, the former director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, can help the party retake the governor's mansion in Ohio this year.

That would mean that a Democrat would likely be appointed to fill Brown's seat should he mount a bid for president in 2020.

The gubernatorial race, however, remains close. A Politico–AARP poll released earlier this month shows Republican Mike DeWine leading Cordray by only 1 point in the race for the governor's mansion.