Sherrod Brown says he's 'not actively considering' running for president

Sherrod Brown says he's 'not actively considering' running for president
© Greg Nash

Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownOvernight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Trump, Dems open drug price talks | FDA warns against infusing young people's blood | Facebook under scrutiny over health data | Harris says Medicare for all isn't socialism On The Money: Smaller tax refunds put GOP on defensive | Dems question IRS on new tax forms | Warren rolls out universal child care proposal | Illinois governor signs bill for minimum wage Michelle Obama would be tied with Biden as frontrunner if she ran in 2020, poll shows MORE (D-Ohio) said that he's not "actively considering" a run for the White House in 2020, though he said he thinks "about it from time to time."

"I'm not actively considering it," he said when asked about it during an interview earlier this week with the Cincinnati Enquirer's editorial board.

But he also acknowledged hearing about it "more and more."

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"I don’t have the great desire to be president like a lot of my colleagues do," Brown said. 

"I think about it from time to time," he added, "but I'm not close to wanting to do that." 

Brown is among a handful of Democrats floated as possible 2020 challengers to President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump nominates Jeffrey Rosen to replace Rosenstein at DOJ McCabe says ‘it’s possible’ Trump is a Russian asset McCabe: Trump ‘undermining the role of law enforcement’ MORE.

The two-term senator is up for reelection this year, but most polls show him with a comfortable lead over his Republican challenger, Rep. Jim RenacciJames (Jim) B. RenacciGOP rep: If Mueller had found collusion, ‘investigation would have wrapped up very quickly’ House Ethics Committee extends probe into Renacci Sherrod Brown says he has 'no real timetable' for deciding on 2020 presidential run MORE

Trump beat out Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSanders campaign reports raising M in less than a day The Memo: Bernie Sanders’s WH launch sharpens ‘socialist’ question Roger Stone invokes gag order in new fundraiser MORE in Ohio in 2016, including in 17 counties that Brown won in his 2012 reelection bid.

Brown was once a potential pick to serve as Clinton's running mate. She ultimately chose Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineDemocrats brush off GOP 'trolling' over Green New Deal Overnight Defense: Trump declares border emergency | .6B in military construction funds to be used for wall | Trump believes Obama would have started war with North Korea | Pentagon delivers aid for Venezuelan migrants Kaine asks Shanahan if military families would be hurt by moving .6B for border wall MORE (D-Va.) in part because Democrats did not want to run the risk of losing Brown's Senate seat. 

Democrats are hoping that gubernatorial candidate Richard CordrayRichard Adams CordrayOn The Money: Consumer bureau proposes scrapping borrower safeguards from payday loan rule | Negotiators running out of time to avert shutdown | Trump nominates World Bank critic as its next chief Consumer bureau proposes scrapping borrower safeguards from payday loan rule Supreme Court should do what Congress won’t: Rein in the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection MORE, the former director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, can help the party retake the governor's mansion in Ohio this year.

That would mean that a Democrat would likely be appointed to fill Brown's seat should he mount a bid for president in 2020.

The gubernatorial race, however, remains close. A Politico–AARP poll released earlier this month shows Republican Mike DeWine leading Cordray by only 1 point in the race for the governor's mansion.