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Sherrod Brown says he's 'not actively considering' running for president

Sherrod Brown says he's 'not actively considering' running for president
© Greg Nash

Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownOn The Money: Deficit hits six-year high of 9 billion | Yellen says Trump attacks threaten Fed | Affordable housing set for spotlight in 2020 race Lawmakers, Wall Street shrug off Trump's escalating Fed attacks The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by PhRMA — Dem victories in `18 will not calm party turbulence MORE (D-Ohio) said that he's not "actively considering" a run for the White House in 2020, though he said he thinks "about it from time to time."

"I'm not actively considering it," he said when asked about it during an interview earlier this week with the Cincinnati Enquirer's editorial board.

But he also acknowledged hearing about it "more and more."

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"I don’t have the great desire to be president like a lot of my colleagues do," Brown said. 

"I think about it from time to time," he added, "but I'm not close to wanting to do that." 

Brown is among a handful of Democrats floated as possible 2020 challengers to President TrumpDonald John TrumpFive takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's debate showdown Arpaio files libel suit against New York Times IMF's Christine Lagarde delays trip to Middle East MORE.

The two-term senator is up for reelection this year, but most polls show him with a comfortable lead over his Republican challenger, Rep. Jim RenacciJames (Jim) B. RenacciThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by PhRMA — Dem victories in `18 will not calm party turbulence Election Countdown: Minnesota Dems worry Ellison allegations could cost them key race | Dems struggle to mobilize Latino voters | Takeaways from Tennessee Senate debate | Poll puts Cruz up 9 in Texas Poll: Republican DeWine has 3-point edge over Cordray in Ohio governor's race MORE

Trump beat out Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBudowsky: Closing message for Democrats Election Countdown: Dems outraise GOP in final stretch | 2018 midterms already most expensive in history | What to watch in second Cruz-O'Rourke debate | Trump raises 0M for reelection | Why Dems fear Avenatti's approach GOP mocks Clinton after minor vehicle collision outside Mendendez campaign event MORE in Ohio in 2016, including in 17 counties that Brown won in his 2012 reelection bid.

Brown was once a potential pick to serve as Clinton's running mate. She ultimately chose Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineOvernight Defense: Trump says 'rogue killers' could be behind missing journalist | Sends Pompeo to meet Saudi king | Saudis may claim Khashoggi killed by accident | Ex-VA chief talks White House 'chaos' | Most F-35s cleared for flight Democrats torch Trump for floating 'rogue killers' to blame for missing journalist Election Countdown: O'Rourke brings in massive M haul | Deal on judges lets senators return to the trail | Hurricane puts Florida candidates in the spotlight | Adelson spending big to save GOP in midterms MORE (D-Va.) in part because Democrats did not want to run the risk of losing Brown's Senate seat. 

Democrats are hoping that gubernatorial candidate Richard CordrayRichard Adams CordrayTrump attacks Democrat in Ohio governor's race Election Countdown: Minnesota Dems worry Ellison allegations could cost them key race | Dems struggle to mobilize Latino voters | Takeaways from Tennessee Senate debate | Poll puts Cruz up 9 in Texas Poll: Cordray leads DeWine by 6 points in Ohio governor race MORE, the former director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, can help the party retake the governor's mansion in Ohio this year.

That would mean that a Democrat would likely be appointed to fill Brown's seat should he mount a bid for president in 2020.

The gubernatorial race, however, remains close. A Politico–AARP poll released earlier this month shows Republican Mike DeWine leading Cordray by only 1 point in the race for the governor's mansion.