Dem group targets Trump in $3M voter registration campaign: report

Dem group targets Trump in $3M voter registration campaign: report
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A progressive group on Monday launched a $3 million voter registration campaign in the 36 states that allow online registration, with a focus on Arizona, Florida and Georgia, CNN reported.

The group, Acronym, debuted its "Knock the Vote" campaign with a logo depicting a silhouette of President TrumpDonald John TrumpActivists highlight Trump ties to foreign autocrats in hotel light display Jose Canseco pitches Trump for chief of staff: ‘Worried about you looking more like a Twinkie everyday’ Dershowitz: Mueller's report will contain 'sins' but no 'impeachable offense' MORE's head being punched, according CNN.

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"It's going to be the thing that pays dividends for election cycles to come, if we can get more voters on the rolls," said Tara McGowan, an Obama reelection campaign staffer leading the new push.

The campaign targets platforms like Snapchat, Facebook and YouTube, and includes short videos and images to encourage users to visit the campaign's website, CNN reported.

Two weeks ago, Acronym joined the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee and the National Democratic Redistricting Committee to launch a $10 million investment in Democratic candidates running for state offices.

Democrats are seeking to retake control of Congress in November's midterm elections, targeting GOP-held House seats where Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonCohen once teased Hillary Clinton about going to prison. Now he's been sentenced to 36 months The Hill's 12:30 Report — Cohen gets three years in prison | Fallout from Oval Office clash | House GOP eyes vote on B for wall Contest offers 'Broadway play and chardonnay' with Clinton MORE defeated Trump in 2016, as well as districts where incumbent Republicans are retiring.

Democrats need a net gain of 23 House seats to regain the majority.

Both Democrats and Republicans are expected to spend heavily as the midterm campaign enters the homestretch.