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Warren: I will consider running for president after the midterms

Warren: I will consider running for president after the midterms
© Anna Moneymaker

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren calls for US to support ceasefire between Israel and Hamas Sanders: Netanyahu has cultivated 'racist nationalism' Tensions mount among Democrats over US-Israel policy MORE (D-Mass.) said at a town hall today she would consider running for president in 2020 once the midterm elections are done. 

“After November 6, I will take a hard look at running for president,” she told a crowd in Holyoke, Mass., which garnered an extended standing ovation, according to CBS News. 

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The comments are among the firmest of any prospective Democratic presidential hopeful that they could seek the party’s nomination.

The only other Democrat to announce a firmer stance on running for president is Rep. John DelaneyJohn DelaneyLobbying world Coronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Rep. Rodney Davis Eurasia Group founder Ian Bremmer says Trump right on China but wrong on WHO; CDC issues new guidance for large gatherings MORE (D-Md.), who already formally announced his campaign. 

Should Warren run for president, it is expected that she would enter a crowded Democratic primary and could face fellow Sens. Cory BookerCory BookerPolice reform talks hit familiar stumbling block Almost 20 advocacy groups team up to pressure Congress to pass health care bill for immigrants Biden adds pressure to congressional talks with self-imposed deadlines MORE (D-N.J.), Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisHere's why Joe Biden polls well, but Kamala Harris does not Immigration experts say GOP senators questioned DHS secretary with misleading chart Carper urges Biden to nominate ambassadors amid influx at border MORE (D-Calif.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans Overnight Defense: Capitol security bill includes 1M to reimburse National Guard | Turner to lead House push against military sexual assault | Pentagon drops mask mandate GOP Rep. Turner to lead House push to address military sexual assault MORE (D-N.Y.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersWarren calls for US to support ceasefire between Israel and Hamas Prominent Muslim group to boycott White House Eid celebration over stance on Israel-Gaza violence Biden speaks with Israel's Netanyahu again amid ramped-up strikes in Gaza MORE (I-Vt.). 

Warren has long been considered a darling to the progressive wing of the Democratic Party in a time when many prospective candidates seek to appeal to that part of the party.

While Warren decided against running for president in 2016, she was reportedly on the vice presidential shortlist for Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonCongress won't end the wars, so states must Democrats say it's up to GOP to stop Trump 2024 Hillary Clinton to speak at Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders summit MORE’s presidential campaign. Clinton ultimately picked Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineSenate Democrats ramp up push to limit Biden's war powers Sweeping election reform bill faces Senate buzz saw How leaving Afghanistan cancels our post-9/11 use of force MORE (D-Va.).

If Warren were to run and win the nomination, her longtime personal feud with President TrumpDonald TrumpSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans Navajo Nation president on Arizona's new voting restrictions: An 'assault' on our rights The Memo: Lawmakers on edge after Greene's spat with Ocasio-Cortez MORE would likely be escalated. The president has dubbed her “Pocahontas,” referring to her controversial claim to Native American heritage. Warren has been a frequent critic of the Trump White House.

Warren is up for reelection this year in the Senate, but it is widely assumed that she will win a second term.