Warren: I will consider running for president after the midterms

Warren: I will consider running for president after the midterms
© Anna Moneymaker

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenThe Democratic nominee won't be democratically chosen Surging Sanders looks for decisive win in Nevada Bloomberg to do interview with Al Sharpton MORE (D-Mass.) said at a town hall today she would consider running for president in 2020 once the midterm elections are done. 

“After November 6, I will take a hard look at running for president,” she told a crowd in Holyoke, Mass., which garnered an extended standing ovation, according to CBS News. 

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The comments are among the firmest of any prospective Democratic presidential hopeful that they could seek the party’s nomination.

The only other Democrat to announce a firmer stance on running for president is Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin DelaneyLobbying world The Hill's Campaign Report: Four-way sprint to Iowa finish line John Delaney drops out of presidential race, Krystal and Saagar react MORE (D-Md.), who already formally announced his campaign. 

Should Warren run for president, it is expected that she would enter a crowded Democratic primary and could face fellow Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Dem anxiety grows ahead of Super Tuesday House to vote on legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime Overnight Energy: EPA to regulate 'forever chemicals' in drinking water | Trump budget calls for slashing funds for climate science centers | House Dems urge banks not to fund drilling in Arctic refuge MORE (D-N.J.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHouse to vote on legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime Overnight Energy: EPA to regulate 'forever chemicals' in drinking water | Trump budget calls for slashing funds for climate science centers | House Dems urge banks not to fund drilling in Arctic refuge Democratic senators criticize plan that could expand Arctic oil and gas development MORE (D-Calif.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandNow is the time for a US data protection agency The Hill's Campaign Report: Warren up, Bloomberg down after brutal debate Ginsburg, accepting lifetime achievement award, urges working fathers to take an active role in kids' lives MORE (D-N.Y.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersRussian interference reports rock Capitol Hill The Democratic nominee won't be democratically chosen Fox's Ingraham mocks DNC over Nevada voting malfunctions: 'Are we a Third World country?' MORE (I-Vt.). 

Warren has long been considered a darling to the progressive wing of the Democratic Party in a time when many prospective candidates seek to appeal to that part of the party.

While Warren decided against running for president in 2016, she was reportedly on the vice presidential shortlist for Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonRussian interference reports rock Capitol Hill Judge dismisses Nunes' lawsuit against Fusion GPS The Hill's Campaign Report: What to watch for in Nevada MORE’s presidential campaign. Clinton ultimately picked Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineThe Hill's Morning Report — AG Barr, GOP senators try to rein Trump in Overnight Defense: Senate votes to rein in Trump war powers on Iran | Pentagon shifting .8B to border wall | US, Taliban negotiate seven-day 'reduction in violence' Democratic senators ask FDA to ban device used to shock disabled students MORE (D-Va.).

If Warren were to run and win the nomination, her longtime personal feud with President TrumpDonald John TrumpWhere do we go from here? Conservation can show the way Gov. Ron DeSantis more popular in Florida than Trump Sotomayor accuses Supreme Court of bias in favor of Trump administration MORE would likely be escalated. The president has dubbed her “Pocahontas,” referring to her controversial claim to Native American heritage. Warren has been a frequent critic of the Trump White House.

Warren is up for reelection this year in the Senate, but it is widely assumed that she will win a second term.