Warren: I will consider running for president after the midterms

Warren: I will consider running for president after the midterms
© Anna Moneymaker

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Keystone XL Pipeline gets nod from Nebraska Supreme Court MORE (D-Mass.) said at a town hall today she would consider running for president in 2020 once the midterm elections are done. 

“After November 6, I will take a hard look at running for president,” she told a crowd in Holyoke, Mass., which garnered an extended standing ovation, according to CBS News. 

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The comments are among the firmest of any prospective Democratic presidential hopeful that they could seek the party’s nomination.

The only other Democrat to announce a firmer stance on running for president is Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin DelaneyThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch The Hill's 12:30 Report: Democratic field narrows with Inslee exit The Hill's Morning Report - Trump touts new immigration policy, backtracks on tax cuts MORE (D-Md.), who already formally announced his campaign. 

Should Warren run for president, it is expected that she would enter a crowded Democratic primary and could face fellow Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Gabbard, Steyer inch toward making third Democratic debate MORE (D-N.J.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Gabbard, Steyer inch toward making third Democratic debate MORE (D-Calif.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Gabbard, Steyer inch toward making third Democratic debate Gillibrand unveils mental health plan MORE (D-N.Y.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Keystone XL Pipeline gets nod from Nebraska Supreme Court MORE (I-Vt.). 

Warren has long been considered a darling to the progressive wing of the Democratic Party in a time when many prospective candidates seek to appeal to that part of the party.

While Warren decided against running for president in 2016, she was reportedly on the vice presidential shortlist for Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe road not taken: Another FBI failure involving the Clintons surfaces DHS cyber agency to prioritize election security, Chinese threats ABC chose a debate moderator who hates Trump MORE’s presidential campaign. Clinton ultimately picked Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineA lesson of the Trump, Tlaib, Omar, Netanyahu affair Warren's pledge to avoid first nuclear strike sparks intense pushback Almost three-quarters say minimum age to buy tobacco should be 21: Gallup MORE (D-Va.).

If Warren were to run and win the nomination, her longtime personal feud with President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch To ward off recession, Trump should keep his mouth and smartphone shut Trump: 'Who is our bigger enemy,' Fed chief or Chinese leader? MORE would likely be escalated. The president has dubbed her “Pocahontas,” referring to her controversial claim to Native American heritage. Warren has been a frequent critic of the Trump White House.

Warren is up for reelection this year in the Senate, but it is widely assumed that she will win a second term.