Obama backs 260 Democrats in second wave of midterm endorsements

Obama backs 260 Democrats in second wave of midterm endorsements
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Former President Obama rolled out a second round of midterm endorsements on Monday, throwing his support behind 260 Democrats in races up and down the ballot. 

The announcements came two months after the former president issued his first endorsements of the 2018 election cycle, backing 81 candidates in gubernatorial, House, Senate and state legislature races across the country. 

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However, some prominent Democratic candidates were not on the list released on Monday, including Rep. Beto O'RourkeRobert (Beto) Francis O'RourkeBarack, Michelle Obama expected to refrain from endorsing in 2020 Dem primary: report Klobuchar, O'Rourke visit Wisconsin as 2020 race heats up Democrats have a chance of beating Trump with Julian Castro on the 2020 ticket MORE (D-Texas), who's looking to unseat Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzEl Chapo's lawyer fires back at Cruz: 'Ludicrous' to suggest drug lord will pay for wall Democrats have a chance of beating Trump with Julian Castro on the 2020 ticket Poll shows competitive matchup if O’Rourke ran for Senate again MORE (R); Rep. Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonIlhan Omar defends 2012 tweet: 'I don't know how my comments would be offensive to Jewish Americans' States scramble to fill void left by federal shutdown 116th Congress breaks records for women, minority lawmakers MORE (D-Minn.), who has denied domestic abuse allegations from a former girlfriend; and Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D-N.Y.).

Among those Democrats to get a shoutout in Obama's latest round of endorsements was Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum, who's locked in a tight battle for the Florida governor's mansion, and Ben Jealous, who's looking to oust Maryland's Republican governor, Larry Hogan.

Both Gillum and Jealous would be the first African-American governors in their states' respective histories if elected in November.

Also on the list was Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D), who is running for Senate in Arizona, as well as incumbent Sens. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William Nelson2020 party politics in Puerto Rico There is no winning without Latinos as part of your coalition Dem 2020 candidates court Puerto Rico as long nomination contest looms MORE (D-Fla.), Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinKlobuchar, O'Rourke visit Wisconsin as 2020 race heats up Dems offer smaller step toward ‘Medicare for all' Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by America's 340B Hospitals — Powerful House committee turns to drug pricing | Utah governor defies voters on Medicaid expansion | Dems want answers on controversial new opioid MORE (D-Wis.) and Tina SmithTina Flint SmithContractor back pay not included in shutdown deal Push to include contractor back pay in funding deal hits GOP roadblock Dems seeking path to Senate majority zero-in on Sun Belt MORE (D-Minn.). 

Obama also endorsed a number of Democrats in competitive House races, including Jason Crow, who's looking to oust Rep. Mike CoffmanMichael (Mike) Howard CoffmanTrump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Gardner gets latest Democratic challenge from former state senator Gardner, Portman endorse Trump for 2020 MORE (R-Colo.) in November, and Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, the Democrat running against Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloTrump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trey Gowdy joins Fox News as a contributor GOP rep will ‘probably’ support measure to back Paris climate pact MORE (R) in his South Florida district.

In a statement, the former president touted the diversity of Democratic tickets across the country and said he was "eager to continue making the case for why they deserve our votes this November."

"Our incredible array of candidates up and down the ticket, all across the country, make up a movement of citizens who are younger, more diverse, more female than ever before," Obama said.

Obama has maintained a relatively low political profile since leaving office last year. But last month, he delivered a stunning rebuke of President TrumpDonald John TrumpRosenstein expected to leave DOJ next month: reports Allies wary of Shanahan's assurances with looming presence of Trump States file lawsuit seeking to block Trump's national emergency declaration MORE during a speech at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, decrying what he called the former real estate mogul's "radical" agenda.

"It’s not conservative. It sure isn’t normal. It’s radical," Obama said in the fiery address. "It’s a vision that says the protection of our power and those who back us is all that matters even when it hurts the country."