Obama backs 260 Democrats in second wave of midterm endorsements

Obama backs 260 Democrats in second wave of midterm endorsements
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Former President Obama rolled out a second round of midterm endorsements on Monday, throwing his support behind 260 Democrats in races up and down the ballot. 

The announcements came two months after the former president issued his first endorsements of the 2018 election cycle, backing 81 candidates in gubernatorial, House, Senate and state legislature races across the country. 

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However, some prominent Democratic candidates were not on the list released on Monday, including Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeOvernight Energy: Top presidential candidates to skip second climate forum | Group sues for info on 'attempts to politicize' NOAA | Trump allows use of oil reserve after Saudi attacks Five top 2020 Democrats haven't committed to MSNBC climate forum Yang campaign says it received 450K entries for 'Freedom Dividend' contest MORE (D-Texas), who's looking to unseat Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzProspects for Trump gun deal grow dimmer Ted Cruz knocks New York Times for 'stunning' correction on Kavanaugh report 2020 Democrats call for Kavanaugh to be impeached MORE (R); Rep. Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonJudge threatens to put prison officials in same uncooled cells as inmates Minnesota students file federal lawsuit against school district alleging 'deliberate indifference' to racist incidents Former Sanders aides launch consulting firm MORE (D-Minn.), who has denied domestic abuse allegations from a former girlfriend; and Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D-N.Y.).

Among those Democrats to get a shoutout in Obama's latest round of endorsements was Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum, who's locked in a tight battle for the Florida governor's mansion, and Ben Jealous, who's looking to oust Maryland's Republican governor, Larry Hogan.

Both Gillum and Jealous would be the first African-American governors in their states' respective histories if elected in November.

Also on the list was Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D), who is running for Senate in Arizona, as well as incumbent Sens. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonAl Franken says he 'absolutely' regrets resigning Democrats target Florida Hispanics in 2020 Poll: Six Democrats lead Trump in Florida match-ups MORE (D-Fla.), Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinFederal funding for Chinese buses risks our national security Democrats threaten to withhold defense votes over wall The Trump downturn: Trouble ahead for the US economy MORE (D-Wis.) and Tina SmithTina Flint SmithThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Former GOP Rep. Jason Lewis says he'll challenge Tina Smith in Minnesota Reid says he wishes Franken would run for Senate again MORE (D-Minn.). 

Obama also endorsed a number of Democrats in competitive House races, including Jason Crow, who's looking to oust Rep. Mike CoffmanMichael (Mike) Howard CoffmanBottom Line Koch political arm endorses Colorado Sen. Gardner 20 years after Columbine, Dems bullish on gun reform MORE (R-Colo.) in November, and Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, the Democrat running against Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloPelosi: GOP retirements indicate they'll be in the minority, with Democrat in the White House The Hill's Morning Report - Congress returns: What to expect Wave of GOP retirements threatens 2020 comeback MORE (R) in his South Florida district.

In a statement, the former president touted the diversity of Democratic tickets across the country and said he was "eager to continue making the case for why they deserve our votes this November."

"Our incredible array of candidates up and down the ticket, all across the country, make up a movement of citizens who are younger, more diverse, more female than ever before," Obama said.

Obama has maintained a relatively low political profile since leaving office last year. But last month, he delivered a stunning rebuke of President TrumpDonald John TrumpBusiness, ballots and battling opioids: Why the Universal Postal Union benefits the US Sanders supporters cry foul over Working Families endorsement of Warren California poll: Biden, Sanders lead Democratic field; Harris takes fifth MORE during a speech at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, decrying what he called the former real estate mogul's "radical" agenda.

"It’s not conservative. It sure isn’t normal. It’s radical," Obama said in the fiery address. "It’s a vision that says the protection of our power and those who back us is all that matters even when it hurts the country."