Obama backs 260 Democrats in second wave of midterm endorsements

Obama backs 260 Democrats in second wave of midterm endorsements
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Former President Obama rolled out a second round of midterm endorsements on Monday, throwing his support behind 260 Democrats in races up and down the ballot. 

The announcements came two months after the former president issued his first endorsements of the 2018 election cycle, backing 81 candidates in gubernatorial, House, Senate and state legislature races across the country. 

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However, some prominent Democratic candidates were not on the list released on Monday, including Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeO'Rourke pens Juneteenth op-ed on ongoing 'march for justice' O'Rourke pens Juneteenth op-ed on ongoing 'march for justice' 'We fight on': 2020 Democrats mark Juneteenth MORE (D-Texas), who's looking to unseat Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGOP frets about Trump's poll numbers GOP frets about Trump's poll numbers GOP senator introduces bill to hold online platforms liable for political bias MORE (R); Rep. Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonHillicon Valley: Facebook unveils new cryptocurrency | Waters wants company to halt plans | Democrats look to force votes on election security | Advertisers partner with tech giants on 'digital safety' | House GOP unveils cyber agenda Hillicon Valley: Facebook unveils new cryptocurrency | Waters wants company to halt plans | Democrats look to force votes on election security | Advertisers partner with tech giants on 'digital safety' | House GOP unveils cyber agenda State attorneys general demand that Congress take action on election security MORE (D-Minn.), who has denied domestic abuse allegations from a former girlfriend; and Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D-N.Y.).

Among those Democrats to get a shoutout in Obama's latest round of endorsements was Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum, who's locked in a tight battle for the Florida governor's mansion, and Ben Jealous, who's looking to oust Maryland's Republican governor, Larry Hogan.

Both Gillum and Jealous would be the first African-American governors in their states' respective histories if elected in November.

Also on the list was Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D), who is running for Senate in Arizona, as well as incumbent Sens. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonPoll: Six Democrats lead Trump in Florida match-ups Poll: Six Democrats lead Trump in Florida match-ups How Jim Bridenstine recruited an old enemy to advise NASA MORE (D-Fla.), Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinChris Murphy may oppose bipartisan health bill unless it addresses ObamaCare 'sabotage' Chris Murphy may oppose bipartisan health bill unless it addresses ObamaCare 'sabotage' Overnight Health Care: Poll finds most Americans misunderstand scope of 'Medicare for All' | Planned Parenthood chief readies for 2020 | Drugmakers' lawsuit ramps up fight with Trump MORE (D-Wis.) and Tina SmithTina Flint SmithDemocrats ask Fed to probe Trump's Deutsche Bank ties Democrats ask Fed to probe Trump's Deutsche Bank ties Democrats push election security legislation after Mueller warning MORE (D-Minn.). 

Obama also endorsed a number of Democrats in competitive House races, including Jason Crow, who's looking to oust Rep. Mike CoffmanMichael (Mike) Howard CoffmanKoch political arm endorses Colorado Sen. Gardner Koch political arm endorses Colorado Sen. Gardner 20 years after Columbine, Dems bullish on gun reform MORE (R-Colo.) in November, and Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, the Democrat running against Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump, Biden go toe-to-toe in Iowa The Hill's Morning Report - Trump, Biden go toe-to-toe in Iowa Ex-GOP lawmakers are face of marijuana blitz MORE (R) in his South Florida district.

In a statement, the former president touted the diversity of Democratic tickets across the country and said he was "eager to continue making the case for why they deserve our votes this November."

"Our incredible array of candidates up and down the ticket, all across the country, make up a movement of citizens who are younger, more diverse, more female than ever before," Obama said.

Obama has maintained a relatively low political profile since leaving office last year. But last month, he delivered a stunning rebuke of President TrumpDonald John TrumpBooker hits Biden's defense of remarks about segregationist senators: 'He's better than this' Booker hits Biden's defense of remarks about segregationist senators: 'He's better than this' Trump says Democrats are handing out subpoenas 'like they're cookies' MORE during a speech at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, decrying what he called the former real estate mogul's "radical" agenda.

"It’s not conservative. It sure isn’t normal. It’s radical," Obama said in the fiery address. "It’s a vision that says the protection of our power and those who back us is all that matters even when it hurts the country."