Obama backs 260 Democrats in second wave of midterm endorsements

Obama backs 260 Democrats in second wave of midterm endorsements
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Former President Obama rolled out a second round of midterm endorsements on Monday, throwing his support behind 260 Democrats in races up and down the ballot. 

The announcements came two months after the former president issued his first endorsements of the 2018 election cycle, backing 81 candidates in gubernatorial, House, Senate and state legislature races across the country. 

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However, some prominent Democratic candidates were not on the list released on Monday, including Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeCNN signs Andrew Yang as contributor Krystal Ball: Voters are coming to their own judgements about who is electable Warren campaign to host series of events in Texas MORE (D-Texas), who's looking to unseat Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSteyer calls for Senate term limits to pass gun control legislation Cruz targets California governor over housing 'prescriptions' This week: House to vote on legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime MORE (R); Rep. Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonScalise after Democrat asks for examples of Sanders supporters 'being bad': 'I can think of an example' Progressive prosecutors hit back at Barr criticism Key House Democrat says Perez must go: 'He doesn't lead on anything' MORE (D-Minn.), who has denied domestic abuse allegations from a former girlfriend; and Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D-N.Y.).

Among those Democrats to get a shoutout in Obama's latest round of endorsements was Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum, who's locked in a tight battle for the Florida governor's mansion, and Ben Jealous, who's looking to oust Maryland's Republican governor, Larry Hogan.

Both Gillum and Jealous would be the first African-American governors in their states' respective histories if elected in November.

Also on the list was Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D), who is running for Senate in Arizona, as well as incumbent Sens. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonThe most expensive congressional races of the last decade Lobbying world Bottom Line MORE (D-Fla.), Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinHillicon Valley: Dems cancel surveillance vote after pushback to amendments | Facebook to ban certain coronavirus ads | Lawmakers grill online ticketing execs | Hacker accessed facial recognition company's database Hillicon Valley: Democrats cancel surveillance vote over pushback to amendments | Lawmakers grill Ticketmaster, StubHub execs over online ticketing | Senators urge USDA to open up rural broadband funding MORE (D-Wis.) and Tina SmithTina Flint SmithDemocratic senators ask FDA to ban device used to shock disabled students Trump pick for Fed seat takes bipartisan fire Biden leads 2020 pack in congressional endorsements MORE (D-Minn.). 

Obama also endorsed a number of Democrats in competitive House races, including Jason Crow, who's looking to oust Rep. Mike CoffmanMichael (Mike) Howard CoffmanBottom Line Koch political arm endorses Colorado Sen. Gardner 20 years after Columbine, Dems bullish on gun reform MORE (R-Colo.) in November, and Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, the Democrat running against Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloRepublicans can't exploit the left's climate extremism without a better idea Progressive Latino group launches first incumbent protection campaign The Memo: Bad polls for Trump shake GOP MORE (R) in his South Florida district.

In a statement, the former president touted the diversity of Democratic tickets across the country and said he was "eager to continue making the case for why they deserve our votes this November."

"Our incredible array of candidates up and down the ticket, all across the country, make up a movement of citizens who are younger, more diverse, more female than ever before," Obama said.

Obama has maintained a relatively low political profile since leaving office last year. But last month, he delivered a stunning rebuke of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump passes Pence a dangerous buck Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Trump nods at reputation as germaphobe during coronavirus briefing: 'I try to bail out as much as possible' after sneezes MORE during a speech at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, decrying what he called the former real estate mogul's "radical" agenda.

"It’s not conservative. It sure isn’t normal. It’s radical," Obama said in the fiery address. "It’s a vision that says the protection of our power and those who back us is all that matters even when it hurts the country."