US Chamber launches tax reform ads in top Senate races

US Chamber launches tax reform ads in top Senate races
© Greg Nash

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce will launch new TV and digital ads in Arizona and Tennessee on Thursday, highlighting the Republican Senate candidates’ votes to pass the GOP tax law.

The new ads, which were shared first with The Hill, are the Chamber’s first foray into both Arizona and Tennessee, home to two competitive Senate races that Republicans are looking to defend in November.

Reps. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnTrump circuit court nominee in jeopardy amid GOP opposition Progressive freshmen jump into leadership PAC fundraising On The Money: US paid record .1B in tariffs in September | Dems ramp up oversight of 'opportunity zones' | Judge hints at letting House lawsuit over Trump tax returns proceed MORE (R-Tenn.) and Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyThis week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry Progressive veterans group launches campaign labeling Trump as a 'national security threat' Advocates step up efforts for horse racing reform bill after more deaths MORE (R-Ariz.), who are running in top Senate races this cycle, both voted in favor of the GOP’s tax plan, which was signed into law late last year. Republicans are looking to protect — and try to expand — their 51-49 seat majority.

The Chamber has been running a number of ads this year that promote the tax cuts, which they believe could boost GOP chances in protecting their majorities.

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“Tennessee’s economy is thriving, and we can’t risk Washington liberals turning back the clock,” the narrator in the Tennessee ad says. “Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn fought to pass historic tax reform.”

Republicans are playing defense in Arizona's and Tennessee’s Senate races where two GOP senators are retiring.

Blackburn faces former Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen (D) in the race to replace retiring Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerLindsey Graham basks in the impeachment spotlight The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Nareit — White House cheers Republicans for storming impeachment hearing GOP senators frustrated with Romney jabs at Trump MORE (R-Tenn.). Meanwhile, McSally is running against Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) to succeed outgoing Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeLindsey Graham basks in the impeachment spotlight Kelly, McSally virtually tied in Arizona Senate race: poll The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Nareit — White House cheers Republicans for storming impeachment hearing MORE (R-Ariz.).

They both face tough challenges from their Democratic opponents in traditionally red states. But recent polling shows the races trending more in Republicans’ favor.

The Chamber has been touting the benefits of the tax law in other states across the country with competitive House and Senate races.

The business-friendly group ran ads in nine House districts, many of which are top battlegrounds that Democrats are targeting in an effort to take back the House. Democrats need to flip 23 seats to regain the House majority.

The Chamber has also run similar spots in Missouri, Florida and Indiana, where Democratic Sens. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillMSNBC's McCaskill: Trump used 'his fat thumbs' to try to intimidate Yovanovitch GOP senator rips into Pelosi at Trump rally: 'It must suck to be that dumb' Iranian attacks expose vulnerability of campaign email accounts MORE (Mo.), Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonBottom Line Bottom Line Media and candidates should be ashamed that they don't talk about obesity MORE (Fla.) and Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyWatchdog accuses pro-Kavanaugh group of sending illegal robotexts in 2018 Lobbying world Trump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand MORE (Ind.) are playing defense in states that President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump reversed course on flavored e-cigarette ban over fear of job losses: report Trump to award National Medal of Arts to actor Jon Voight Sondland notified Trump officials of investigation push ahead of Ukraine call: report MORE won in 2016.

Meanwhile, Democrats have been actively running against the tax law, arguing that it benefits wealthy individuals and corporations over middle-class families.

Updated at 6:47 p.m.