US Chamber launches tax reform ads in top Senate races

US Chamber launches tax reform ads in top Senate races
© Greg Nash

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce will launch new TV and digital ads in Arizona and Tennessee on Thursday, highlighting the Republican Senate candidates’ votes to pass the GOP tax law.

The new ads, which were shared first with The Hill, are the Chamber’s first foray into both Arizona and Tennessee, home to two competitive Senate races that Republicans are looking to defend in November.

Reps. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnTrump’s new Syria timetable raises concern among key anti-ISIS allies Dem lawmaker invites Parkland survivor to attend State of the Union Bipartisan senators press Trump for strategy to protect Syrian Kurds MORE (R-Tenn.) and Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyArmy calls base housing hazards 'unconscionable,' details steps to protect families Poll shows McSally, Kelly tied in Arizona Senate race Mark Kelly's campaign raises over M in days after launching Senate bid MORE (R-Ariz.), who are running in top Senate races this cycle, both voted in favor of the GOP’s tax plan, which was signed into law late last year. Republicans are looking to protect — and try to expand — their 51-49 seat majority.

The Chamber has been running a number of ads this year that promote the tax cuts, which they believe could boost GOP chances in protecting their majorities.

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“Tennessee’s economy is thriving, and we can’t risk Washington liberals turning back the clock,” the narrator in the Tennessee ad says. “Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn fought to pass historic tax reform.”

Republicans are playing defense in Arizona's and Tennessee’s Senate races where two GOP senators are retiring.

Blackburn faces former Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen (D) in the race to replace retiring Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerSasse’s jabs at Trump spark talk of primary challenger RNC votes to give Trump 'undivided support' ahead of 2020 Sen. Risch has unique chance to guide Trump on foreign policy MORE (R-Tenn.). Meanwhile, McSally is running against Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) to succeed outgoing Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakePoll: 33% of Kentucky voters approve of McConnell Trump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Live coverage: Trump delivers State of the Union MORE (R-Ariz.).

They both face tough challenges from their Democratic opponents in traditionally red states. But recent polling shows the races trending more in Republicans’ favor.

The Chamber has been touting the benefits of the tax law in other states across the country with competitive House and Senate races.

The business-friendly group ran ads in nine House districts, many of which are top battlegrounds that Democrats are targeting in an effort to take back the House. Democrats need to flip 23 seats to regain the House majority.

The Chamber has also run similar spots in Missouri, Florida and Indiana, where Democratic Sens. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillPoll: 33% of Kentucky voters approve of McConnell McCaskill: Lindsey Graham 'has lost his mind' Trey Gowdy joins Fox News as a contributor MORE (Mo.), Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William Nelson2020 party politics in Puerto Rico There is no winning without Latinos as part of your coalition Dem 2020 candidates court Puerto Rico as long nomination contest looms MORE (Fla.) and Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyOvernight Energy: Trump taps ex-oil lobbyist Bernhardt to lead Interior | Bernhardt slams Obama officials for agency's ethics issues | Head of major green group steps down Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary EPA's Wheeler faces grilling over rule rollbacks MORE (Ind.) are playing defense in states that President TrumpDonald John TrumpAverage tax refunds down double-digits, IRS data shows White House warns Maduro as Venezuela orders partial closure of border with Colombia Trump administration directs 1,000 more troops to Mexican border MORE won in 2016.

Meanwhile, Democrats have been actively running against the tax law, arguing that it benefits wealthy individuals and corporations over middle-class families.

Updated at 6:47 p.m.