US Chamber launches tax reform ads in top Senate races

US Chamber launches tax reform ads in top Senate races
© Greg Nash

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce will launch new TV and digital ads in Arizona and Tennessee on Thursday, highlighting the Republican Senate candidates’ votes to pass the GOP tax law.

The new ads, which were shared first with The Hill, are the Chamber’s first foray into both Arizona and Tennessee, home to two competitive Senate races that Republicans are looking to defend in November.

Reps. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnDemocrats smell blood with new DHS whistleblower complaint Hillicon Valley: Election officials prepare for new Russian interference battle | 'Markeyverse' of online fans helps take down a Kennedy | GOP senators unveil bill to update tech liability protections GOP senators unveil new bill to update tech liability protections MORE (R-Tenn.) and Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyTumultuous court battle upends fight for Senate Grassley, Ernst pledge to 'evaluate' Trump's Supreme Court nominee The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden goes on offense MORE (R-Ariz.), who are running in top Senate races this cycle, both voted in favor of the GOP’s tax plan, which was signed into law late last year. Republicans are looking to protect — and try to expand — their 51-49 seat majority.

The Chamber has been running a number of ads this year that promote the tax cuts, which they believe could boost GOP chances in protecting their majorities.

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“Tennessee’s economy is thriving, and we can’t risk Washington liberals turning back the clock,” the narrator in the Tennessee ad says. “Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn fought to pass historic tax reform.”

Republicans are playing defense in Arizona's and Tennessee’s Senate races where two GOP senators are retiring.

Blackburn faces former Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen (D) in the race to replace retiring Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerHas Congress captured Russia policy? Tennessee primary battle turns nasty for Republicans Cheney clashes with Trump MORE (R-Tenn.). Meanwhile, McSally is running against Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) to succeed outgoing Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeJeff Flake: Republicans 'should hold the same position' on SCOTUS vacancy as 2016 Republican former Michigan governor says he's voting for Biden Maybe they just don't like cowboys: The president is successful, some just don't like his style MORE (R-Ariz.).

They both face tough challenges from their Democratic opponents in traditionally red states. But recent polling shows the races trending more in Republicans’ favor.

The Chamber has been touting the benefits of the tax law in other states across the country with competitive House and Senate races.

The business-friendly group ran ads in nine House districts, many of which are top battlegrounds that Democrats are targeting in an effort to take back the House. Democrats need to flip 23 seats to regain the House majority.

The Chamber has also run similar spots in Missouri, Florida and Indiana, where Democratic Sens. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillMomentum growing among Republicans for Supreme Court vote before Election Day Democratic-linked group runs ads in Kansas GOP Senate primary Trump mocked for low attendance at rally MORE (Mo.), Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonDemocrats sound alarm on possible election chaos Trump, facing trouble in Florida, goes all in NASA names DC headquarters after agency's first Black female engineer Mary W. Jackson MORE (Fla.) and Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyTrump meets with potential Supreme Court pick Amy Coney Barrett at White House Names to watch as Trump picks Ginsburg replacement on Supreme Court Momentum growing among Republicans for Supreme Court vote before Election Day MORE (Ind.) are playing defense in states that President TrumpDonald John TrumpBubba Wallace to be driver of Michael Jordan, Denny Hamlin NASCAR team Graham: GOP will confirm Trump's Supreme Court nominee before the election Southwest Airlines, unions call for six-month extension of government aid MORE won in 2016.

Meanwhile, Democrats have been actively running against the tax law, arguing that it benefits wealthy individuals and corporations over middle-class families.

Updated at 6:47 p.m.