DNC chair: 'I don't use the term blue wave'

DNC chair: 'I don't use the term blue wave'
© Greg Nash

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom PerezThomas Edward PerezClinton’s top five vice presidential picks Government social programs: Triumph of hope over evidence Labor’s 'wasteful spending and mismanagement” at Workers’ Comp MORE said Monday that he has always thought this year's elections would be close and that he doesn’t use the term “blue wave” to describe a possible big win for his party.

“We always knew that this election was going to be close — I don’t use the term ‘blue wave,’ I always talk about the need for the blocking and tackling,” Perez said in comments on CNN’s “New Day."

“I always talk about the need for organizing, to make sure you’re leading with your values, and that’s how we’ve been winning throughout this year and throughout 2017.”

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Perez expressed confidence that Democrats will take control of the House, and spoke confidently about flipping a number of governor seats.

“I don’t think the Democratic advantage has ebbed,” Perez said, citing heightened Democratic voter turnout in the primaries. “We’re talking about the issues that matter most to people.”

Recent polls have shown that Republicans are gaining ground in the battle for control of the Senate, with many crediting the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughGraham angers Dems by digging into Clinton, Obama controversies The Memo: Concern over shutdown grows in Trump World Merriam-Webster tweets out definition of 'suborn' after BuzzFeed report on Michael Cohen MORE as a boost for the party.

Democrats are still favored to win back the House majority, though Republicans have expressed hope they can keep Democratic gains under the 23 seats the party needs to win control. 

President TrumpDonald John TrumpGeorge Conway on Giuliani walking back Trump Tower Moscow comments: ‘Translation: I made sh-- up’ MLK weekend marks longest span without a press briefing in Trump presidency Giuliani says his comments on Trump Tower talks were 'hypothetical' MORE's approval ratings have been on the rise, which could be helping GOP lawmakers in the battle for control of Congress.

At the same time, Democrats held a a 9-point lead over Republicans in an NBC/Wall Street Journal poll released Sunday that asked people which party they'd prefer to have be in control of Congress.