Trump privately ready to blame Ryan and McConnell if Republicans lose midterms: report

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump passes Pence a dangerous buck Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Trump nods at reputation as germaphobe during coronavirus briefing: 'I try to bail out as much as possible' after sneezes MORE is privately ready to blame Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Push for national popular vote movement gets boost from conservatives To avoid November catastrophe, Democrats have to KO Sanders MORE (R-Ky.) and House Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanPaul Ryan says he disagrees with Romney's impeachment vote Trump doubles down on Neil Cavuto attacks: 'Will he get the same treatment as' Shep Smith? Trump lashes out at Fox News coverage: 'I won every one of my debates' MORE (R-Wis.) should Republicans lose the majority in either chamber, according to Politico.

Politico, citing two people familiar with conversations with the president, reported that Trump views 2020 as “the real election” and doesn’t see the midterms as a referendum on himself, even though that is what he is telling crowds at campaign rallies.

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“These are their elections … and if they screw it up, it’s not my fault," Politico reported Trump as saying, citing one person with knowledge of these talks. 

Last month in Missouri, Trump told the crowd “get out in 2018, because you're voting for me.”

Trump told The Associated Press last week that he would not accept blame if the GOP loses seats in the midterms. 

Ryan, who is set to retire at the end of his term, had a rocky relationship with Trump during the 2016 presidential race.

Trump recently praised McConnell for holding the line on the president’s Supreme Court nomination of Brett KavanaughBrett Michael Kavanaugh70 former senators propose bipartisan caucus for incumbents Justices bar Mexican parents from suing over fatal cross-border shooting of teen Supreme Court upholds death sentence for Arizona man MORE as he faced a contentious hearing process amid sexual misconduct allegations.

Democrats are expected to take the majority in the House and Republicans are predicted to retain control of the Senate, according to FiveThirtyEight.