Trailing GOP Senate candidate invokes opponent's underdog victory in fundraising push

Trailing GOP Senate candidate invokes opponent's underdog victory in fundraising push
© Greg Nash

John James, the Republican running for Michigan's U.S. Senate seat against incumbent Sen. Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowDemocrats seize Senate floor to protest gun inaction: 'Put up or shut up' Conservatives offer stark warning to Trump, GOP on background checks USDA cuts payments promised to researchers as agency uproots to Kansas City MORE (D) on Tuesday recalled his opponent's own underdog victory in 2000 in a fundraising push as he trails Stabenow in most polling.

James pointed out in a tweet Tuesday  that the polling deficit he faces between himself and Stabenow is just half the size of the gap Stabenow faced days before the election in 2000.

"14 days out in 2000 -> @Stabenow was down 14 & won," James tweeted. "14 days out in 2018 -> We’re 7 points away & closing in quickly! Donate NOW to help us keep SURGING in the polls!"

James's source for his polling numbers was revealed in a press release to be from the Republican poling firm The Tarrance Group, however a RealClearPolitics average of polls shows Stabenow ahead by as much as 16 points, with James trailing by 9 points in a recent survey by Mitchell Research earlier this month.

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No other polls in the race show James trailing his opponent by less than 9 points, according to RealClearPolitics.

Stabenow's campaign did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill, and James's campaign did not immediately return a request for clarification on its poll numbers.

An Opensecrets.org analysis of the race shows James trailing Stabenow in fundraising by almost $10 million over the course of the race, while James has spent a little more than a third of the money Stabenow has spent on her reelection bid.

Republicans are eyeing Stabenow's seat as a potential pickup as the party seeks to maintain control of the Senate and the House in November's midterms. Democrats need two seats in the Senate and 23 in the House for control of both houses of Congress.

This article was updated at 9:00 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct 24.