Gillibrand: If reelected ‘I will serve my six-year term’

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandGroup aiming to draft Beto O’Rourke unveils first 2020 video The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Day 27 of the shutdown | Cohen reportedly paid company to rig online polls, boost his own image | Atlantic publishes ‘Impeach Donald Trump’ cover story Gillibrand to attend Women's March Iowa after announcing 2020 bid MORE (D-N.Y.) rebutted speculation she is running for president in 2020 and vowed to serve her full term if reelected to a second full term in the Senate this November.

“I will serve my six-year term,” Gillibrand said during a debate against Republican challenger Chele Farley, who serves as the financial chair for New York’s Republican Party. She also noted that she had visited all 62 of New York’s counties and held 16 town halls during her reelection campaign.

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Farley scoffed at the comment, saying, “Honestly, I don’t believe that,” and noted Gillibrand had visited states such as New Hampshire, a crucial state in a successful presidential bid because of its early primary elections. 

Gillibrand, who also campaigned for Philadelphia-area candidates earlier this month, replied, “I think campaigning for other candidates around our state and around the country is important. We need a Congress that actually supports the values of New York voters.” 

“That means making sure that health care is a right, not a privilege, making sure that anybody who wants to be working hard can be working hard and having the right job training, and that’s why it’s important for me to support women running for office. We need to change the players list,” she added. 

Speculation around Gillibrand’s presidential aspirations has been a theme of Farley’s campaign, which released an ad in July saying, “Instead of a promotion, Gillibrand should be fired.”

The New York Senate race is not considered to be competitive. A recent Quinnipiac University poll had Gillibrand up 25 points.

Politicians sometimes distance themselves from talks of presidential campaigns while running for reelection. Earlier this year, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenOn The Money: Shutdown Day 27 | Trump fires back at Pelosi by canceling her foreign travel | Dems blast 'petty' move | Trump also cancels delegation to Davos | House votes to disapprove of Trump lifting Russia sanction Group aiming to draft Beto O’Rourke unveils first 2020 video The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Day 27 of the shutdown | Cohen reportedly paid company to rig online polls, boost his own image | Atlantic publishes ‘Impeach Donald Trump’ cover story MORE (D-Mass.) denied she would run for president, but then said she would explore the option after the midterm elections.

Democrats are likely to field a wide range of candidates against President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump directed Cohen to lie to Congress about plans to build Trump Tower in Moscow during 2016 campaign: report DC train system losing 0k per day during government shutdown Senate Republicans eye rules change to speed Trump nominees MORE in 2020, including several of Gillibrand’s colleagues including Sens. Warren, Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersWomen's March plans 'Medicare for All' day of lobbying in DC Group aiming to draft Beto O’Rourke unveils first 2020 video Why Joe Biden (or any moderate) cannot be nominated MORE (I-Vt.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisOcasio-Cortez's first House floor speech becomes C-SPAN's most-viewed Twitter video Kamala Harris says her New Year's resolution is to 'cook more' Harris to oppose Trump's attorney general nominee MORE (D-Calif) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerWe need action on personal cybersecurity Gillibrand and Booker play 'How Well Do You Know Your Co-Worker' game amid 2020 speculation The Hill's Morning Report — Trump’s attorney general pick passes first test MORE (D-N.J.), as well as other possible candidates like former Vice President Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenLosing the fight against corruption and narco-trafficking in Guatemala Group aiming to draft Beto O’Rourke unveils first 2020 video Why Joe Biden (or any moderate) cannot be nominated MORE, former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderWilliam Barr's only 'flaw' is that he was nominated by Trump Protecting voices of all voters is critical to free and fair elections Castro to headline forum in New Hampshire after announcing 2020 decision MORE, former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, former New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti.

Several potential candidates have already visited multiple presidential swing states, fueling further rumors they are considering presidential runs.