Gillibrand: If reelected ‘I will serve my six-year term’

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth Gillibrand2020 Dems put spotlight on disabilities issues Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — CBO officials testify on pros and cons of 'Medicare for All' | Booker vows to form White House office on abortion rights | Measles outbreak spreads with cases now in half the country Lee, Sanders introduce bill to tax Wall Street transactions MORE (D-N.Y.) rebutted speculation she is running for president in 2020 and vowed to serve her full term if reelected to a second full term in the Senate this November.

“I will serve my six-year term,” Gillibrand said during a debate against Republican challenger Chele Farley, who serves as the financial chair for New York’s Republican Party. She also noted that she had visited all 62 of New York’s counties and held 16 town halls during her reelection campaign.

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Farley scoffed at the comment, saying, “Honestly, I don’t believe that,” and noted Gillibrand had visited states such as New Hampshire, a crucial state in a successful presidential bid because of its early primary elections. 

Gillibrand, who also campaigned for Philadelphia-area candidates earlier this month, replied, “I think campaigning for other candidates around our state and around the country is important. We need a Congress that actually supports the values of New York voters.” 

“That means making sure that health care is a right, not a privilege, making sure that anybody who wants to be working hard can be working hard and having the right job training, and that’s why it’s important for me to support women running for office. We need to change the players list,” she added. 

Speculation around Gillibrand’s presidential aspirations has been a theme of Farley’s campaign, which released an ad in July saying, “Instead of a promotion, Gillibrand should be fired.”

The New York Senate race is not considered to be competitive. A recent Quinnipiac University poll had Gillibrand up 25 points.

Politicians sometimes distance themselves from talks of presidential campaigns while running for reelection. Earlier this year, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Harris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign 2020 Dems put spotlight on disabilities issues MORE (D-Mass.) denied she would run for president, but then said she would explore the option after the midterm elections.

Democrats are likely to field a wide range of candidates against President TrumpDonald John TrumpFeinstein, Iranian foreign minister had dinner amid tensions: report The Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Harris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign MORE in 2020, including several of Gillibrand’s colleagues including Sens. Warren, Bernie SandersBernie SandersHarris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign 2020 Dems put spotlight on disabilities issues Lee, Sanders introduce bill to tax Wall Street transactions MORE (I-Vt.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Harris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign 2020 Dems put spotlight on disabilities issues MORE (D-Calif) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerHarris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign T.I., Charlamagne Tha God advocate for opportunity zones on Capitol Hill Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — CBO officials testify on pros and cons of 'Medicare for All' | Booker vows to form White House office on abortion rights | Measles outbreak spreads with cases now in half the country MORE (D-N.J.), as well as other possible candidates like former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Harris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign 2020 Dems put spotlight on disabilities issues MORE, former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderEric Holder: 'There are grounds for impeachment' in Mueller report Prosecutor appointed by Barr poised to enter Washington firestorm Dems struggle to make Trump bend on probes MORE, former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, former New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti.

Several potential candidates have already visited multiple presidential swing states, fueling further rumors they are considering presidential runs.