Gillibrand: If reelected ‘I will serve my six-year term’

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandThe Hill's Campaign Report: Biden struggles to stay in the spotlight Biden fights for attention in coronavirus news cycle Lawmakers already planning more coronavirus stimulus after T package MORE (D-N.Y.) rebutted speculation she is running for president in 2020 and vowed to serve her full term if reelected to a second full term in the Senate this November.

“I will serve my six-year term,” Gillibrand said during a debate against Republican challenger Chele Farley, who serves as the financial chair for New York’s Republican Party. She also noted that she had visited all 62 of New York’s counties and held 16 town halls during her reelection campaign.

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Farley scoffed at the comment, saying, “Honestly, I don’t believe that,” and noted Gillibrand had visited states such as New Hampshire, a crucial state in a successful presidential bid because of its early primary elections. 

Gillibrand, who also campaigned for Philadelphia-area candidates earlier this month, replied, “I think campaigning for other candidates around our state and around the country is important. We need a Congress that actually supports the values of New York voters.” 

“That means making sure that health care is a right, not a privilege, making sure that anybody who wants to be working hard can be working hard and having the right job training, and that’s why it’s important for me to support women running for office. We need to change the players list,” she added. 

Speculation around Gillibrand’s presidential aspirations has been a theme of Farley’s campaign, which released an ad in July saying, “Instead of a promotion, Gillibrand should be fired.”

The New York Senate race is not considered to be competitive. A recent Quinnipiac University poll had Gillibrand up 25 points.

Politicians sometimes distance themselves from talks of presidential campaigns while running for reelection. Earlier this year, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOn The Money: Trump officials struggle to get relief loans out the door | Dow soars more than 1600 points | Kudlow says officials 'looking at' offering coronavirus bonds Overnight Energy: Trump floats oil tariffs amid Russia-Saudi dispute | Warren knocks EPA over 'highly dangerous' enforcement rollback | 2019 sees big increase in methane levels in air Ex-CFPB director urges agency to 'act immediately' to help consumers during pandemic MORE (D-Mass.) denied she would run for president, but then said she would explore the option after the midterm elections.

Democrats are likely to field a wide range of candidates against President TrumpDonald John TrumpOvernight Health Care: US hits 10,000 coronavirus deaths | Trump touts 'friendly' talk with Biden on response | Trump dismisses report on hospital shortages as 'just wrong' | Cuomo sees possible signs of curve flattening in NY We need to be 'One America,' the polling says — and the politicians should listen Barr tells prosecutors to consider coronavirus risk when determining bail: report MORE in 2020, including several of Gillibrand’s colleagues including Sens. Warren, Bernie SandersBernie SandersWisconsin Supreme Court blocks governor's effort to delay election The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden, Trump discuss coronavirus response; Wisconsin postpones elections Wisconsin governor postpones Tuesday's election over coronavirus MORE (I-Vt.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Dybul interview; Boris Johnson update Biden hosts potential VP pick Gretchen Whitmer on podcast Why Gretchen Whitmer's stock is rising with Team Biden MORE (D-Calif) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerEnlisting tech to fight coronavirus sparks surveillance fears Democrats urge administration to automatically issue coronavirus checks to more people Democrats ask EPA, Interior to pause rulemaking amid coronavirus MORE (D-N.J.), as well as other possible candidates like former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenOvernight Health Care: US hits 10,000 coronavirus deaths | Trump touts 'friendly' talk with Biden on response | Trump dismisses report on hospital shortages as 'just wrong' | Cuomo sees possible signs of curve flattening in NY We need to be 'One America,' the polling says — and the politicians should listen 16 things to know today about coronavirus MORE, former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderBiden hosts potential VP pick Gretchen Whitmer on podcast The Hill's Campaign Report: Coronavirus forces Democrats to postpone convention Biden associates reach out to Holder about VP search MORE, former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, former New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti.

Several potential candidates have already visited multiple presidential swing states, fueling further rumors they are considering presidential runs.