Gillibrand: If reelected ‘I will serve my six-year term’

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandOn The Money: Trump rolls dice on uncertain economy | 737 crisis tests Boeing's clout in Washington | Watchdog group pushes 2020 candidates for 10 years of tax returns Watchdog group calls on 2020 candidates to release 10 years of tax returns Poll: Gillibrand, de Blasio have favorable ratings under 30 percent among New Yorkers MORE (D-N.Y.) rebutted speculation she is running for president in 2020 and vowed to serve her full term if reelected to a second full term in the Senate this November.

“I will serve my six-year term,” Gillibrand said during a debate against Republican challenger Chele Farley, who serves as the financial chair for New York’s Republican Party. She also noted that she had visited all 62 of New York’s counties and held 16 town halls during her reelection campaign.

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Farley scoffed at the comment, saying, “Honestly, I don’t believe that,” and noted Gillibrand had visited states such as New Hampshire, a crucial state in a successful presidential bid because of its early primary elections. 

Gillibrand, who also campaigned for Philadelphia-area candidates earlier this month, replied, “I think campaigning for other candidates around our state and around the country is important. We need a Congress that actually supports the values of New York voters.” 

“That means making sure that health care is a right, not a privilege, making sure that anybody who wants to be working hard can be working hard and having the right job training, and that’s why it’s important for me to support women running for office. We need to change the players list,” she added. 

Speculation around Gillibrand’s presidential aspirations has been a theme of Farley’s campaign, which released an ad in July saying, “Instead of a promotion, Gillibrand should be fired.”

The New York Senate race is not considered to be competitive. A recent Quinnipiac University poll had Gillibrand up 25 points.

Politicians sometimes distance themselves from talks of presidential campaigns while running for reelection. Earlier this year, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenOn The Money: Trump rolls dice on uncertain economy | 737 crisis tests Boeing's clout in Washington | Watchdog group pushes 2020 candidates for 10 years of tax returns House Dems unveil measure to reject anti-Israel boycotts Bannon says an O'Rourke-Harris ticket poses the greatest threat to Trump in 2020 MORE (D-Mass.) denied she would run for president, but then said she would explore the option after the midterm elections.

Democrats are likely to field a wide range of candidates against President TrumpDonald John TrumpClinton and Ocasio-Cortez joke about Kushner's alleged use of WhatsApp Missouri Gov. declares state of emergency amid severe flooding Swalwell on Hicks testimony: 'She's going to have to tell us who she lied for' in Trump admin MORE in 2020, including several of Gillibrand’s colleagues including Sens. Warren, Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersMichael Bennet 'encouraged' in possible presidential bid: report House Dems unveil measure to reject anti-Israel boycotts Bannon says an O'Rourke-Harris ticket poses the greatest threat to Trump in 2020 MORE (I-Vt.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisMichael Bennet 'encouraged' in possible presidential bid: report House Dems unveil measure to reject anti-Israel boycotts Strategist says Trump is 'retreating' from talking about foreign policy MORE (D-Calif) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBannon says an O'Rourke-Harris ticket poses the greatest threat to Trump in 2020 Jared Kushner's brother made last-minute donation to Beto O'Rourke Senate campaign Biden advisers mull launch naming Abrams as running mate: report MORE (D-N.J.), as well as other possible candidates like former Vice President Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenTrump has lost support from male voters since shutdown, analysis shows Biden-Abrams ticket would be a genius media move The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump attacks on McCain rattle GOP senators MORE, former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderJeff Sessions returns to Justice Department to retrieve Cabinet chair The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump steps up attacks on McCain Court-packing becomes new litmus test on left MORE, former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, former New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti.

Several potential candidates have already visited multiple presidential swing states, fueling further rumors they are considering presidential runs.