Election Day: An hour-by-hour viewer’s guide

For a solid hour on Tuesday, all eyes will be trained on Lexington, Ky., and its suburbs, where Rep. Andy BarrGarland (Andy) Hale BarrOn The Money: House chairman issues subpoenas for Trump's tax returns | Trump touts trade talks as China, US fail to reach deal | Five things to know about Trump's trade war with China | GOP offers support for Trump on tariffs GOP offers support for Trump on China tariffs Five things to know about Trump's trade war with China MORE (R) is running for reelection against retired Marine Lt. Col. Amy McGrath (D).

That’s because Kentucky closes its polling places at 6 p.m. local time — and Barr’s 6th District is the only competitive race based entirely within the Eastern time zone.

Here’s an hour-by-hour look at how Election Day will unfold, and what to watch as the polls close.

6 p.m. Eastern — The Canary in Coal Country

Barr represents a district that voted for President TrumpDonald John TrumpComey: Barr is 'sliming his own department' GOP Mueller critic says Flynn contacted him during special counsel probe: report Acting DHS secretary threatened to quit after clashing with Miller: report MORE by a 15-point margin in 2016 — but it’s a seat with Democratic roots, one long held by former Rep. Ben Chandler (D). If McGrath pulls off an early upset, Republicans are likely going to have a very bad night. But if Barr hangs on, as polling indicates, the GOP’s House majority is still in play.

7 p.m. — The First Hints

Six states close their polling places at 7 p.m., from liberal Vermont to conservative South Carolina, and the rest of Kentucky.

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Vote-counting will begin in two of the hottest races in the country: Georgia’s gubernatorial race, a fierce battle between Secretary of State Brian Kemp (R) and state House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams (D), and Indiana’s Senate race, where Sen. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyObama honors 'American statesman' Richard Lugar Former GOP senator Richard Lugar dies at 87 Ralph Reed: Biden is a 'formidable and strong candidate' MORE (D) faces former state Rep. Mike Braun (R).

If Donnelly loses quickly, it would augur poorly for other red-state Democratic senators. But if he prevails, Sens. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillBig Dem names show little interest in Senate Gillibrand, Grassley reintroduce campus sexual assault bill Endorsements? Biden can't count on a flood from the Senate MORE (D-Mo.) and Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampOn The Money: Stocks sink on Trump tariff threat | GOP caught off guard by new trade turmoil | Federal deficit grew 38 percent this fiscal year | Banks avoid taking position in Trump, Dem subpoena fight Fight over Trump's new NAFTA hits key stretch Former senators launching effort to help Dems win rural votes MORE (D-N.D.) may find reason for optimism.

In Virginia, voters in the Richmond suburbs and Norfolk will reveal some of the first hints of the size of the Democratic advantage in the House. GOP Reps. Scott TaylorScott William TaylorVirginia special prosecutor indicts former GOP campaign staffer The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority Ex-GOP Rep. Ryan Costello joins group pushing carbon tax MORE and Dave Brat have tough fights on their hands, and a Democrat is even making a run at outgoing Rep. Tom GarrettThomas (Tom) Alexander GarrettFemale Dems see double standard in Klobuchar accusations Ethics investigation finds outgoing House Republican made staff unload groceries, dog-sit Trump signs bill naming post office after soldier whose parents he attacked MORE’s (R) seat. If Democrats take two of those, the Republican majority is probably gone.

7:30 p.m. — A Blue Moon and a Blue Dog

Polls close in North Carolina, Ohio and West Virginia at this time. Two red-state Senate Democrats will see their fates decided: Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownLawmakers grapple with the future of America's workforce The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - Restrictive state abortion laws ignite fiery 2020 debate On The Money: Mnuchin signals officials won't release Trump tax returns | Trump to hold off on auto tariffs | WH nears deal with Mexico, Canada on metal tariffs | GOP fears trade war fallout for farmers | Warren, regulator spar over Wells Fargo MORE (Ohio) is likely to cruise to reelection, and Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinLabor head warns of 'frightening uptick' in black lung disease among miners Labor leader: Trump has stopped erosion of coal jobs Overnight Energy: States fight Trump rollback of Obama lightbulb rules | Greens seek hearing over proposed rule on energy efficiency tests | Top Dem asks GAO to investigate climate threat MORE (W.Va.) is favored to win, but in a much tighter race.

Democrats will get the first signs of their ability to flip Republican-held governorships across the Midwest when Ohio begins counting its ballots. Former state Attorney General Richard CordrayRichard Adams CordrayThe road to the White House still goes through Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan announces presidential run Sherrod Brown says he will not run for president MORE (D), who was later head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in Washington, is fighting his successor, Mike DeWine (R), for the right to succeed term-limited Gov. John Kasich (R).

North Carolina experiences what they call a "blue moon" election, a rare year in which neither the governor nor a senator is on the ballot. That probably means lower turnout, but Democrats are running surprisingly strong races against Reps. George HoldingGeorge Edward Bell HoldingRepublicans troll Democrats with proposals to rename upcoming health care bill GOP lawmaker calls for investigation into alleged 'anti-Israeli bias' at Duke-UNC conference Renee Ellmers announces bid for North Carolina lieutenant governor MORE (R) and Ted BuddTheodore (Ted) Paul BuddBlockchain could spark renaissance economy GOP's Tillis comes under pressure for taking on Trump The 23 Republicans who voted against the anti-hate resolution MORE (R), and for a seat held by Rep. Robert PittengerRobert Miller PittengerNorth Carolina reporter says there could be 'new crop' of GOP candidates in 9th Congressional District race North Carolina board calls for new election in contested House race Obama political arm to merge with Holder-run group MORE (R), who lost his primary.

8 p.m. — The Big Enchilada

Sixteen states and the District of Columbia are done voting by 8 p.m. Eastern, including a handful of states that will give a fuller picture of the electorate’s mood.

Governor’s races will be decided in Alabama, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Tennessee.

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The biggest prize for Democrats would be in Florida, scene of a nasty battle between Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum (D) and former Rep. Ron DeSantisRonald Dion DeSantisDem criticizes newest calendars for Trump Interior chief as 'fake' GOP gov pushes back on Trump plan to send migrants to Florida counties Small Florida county that backed Trump one of two targeted by Russians: reports MORE (R). In Connecticut, businessman Bob Stefanowski (R) is running a particularly tough race against progressive hero Ned Lamont (D). Expect Govs. Charlie Baker (R) of Massachusetts and Larry Hogan (R) of Maryland to win reelection easily, thanks to ticket-splitters who will also reelect Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenLet's stop treating student borrowers like second-class citizens Overnight Health Care — Presented by Campaign for Accountability — Momentum builds for federal laws enshrining abortion rights | Missouri lawmakers approve bill banning abortions at 8 weeks | Warren unveils plan to protect abortion rights 2020 Dem Seth Moulton calls for expanding cannabis access for veterans MORE (D-Mass.) and Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinOn The Money: GOP angst grows over Trump's trade war | Trump promises help for 'Patriot Farmers' | Markets rebound | CBO founding director Alice Rivlin dies | Senate to vote on disaster aid bill next week Senators offer bipartisan retirement savings bill Top Finance Dem offers bill to help those repaying student loans save for retirement MORE (D-Md.).

Vote-counting also begins in key Senate races in Florida, Missouri, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Tennessee. In Mississippi, expect Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R) and former Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy (D) to head to a late November runoff.

The House battleground expands to Democratic targets in Florida, Illinois, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Oklahoma — where a PAC linked to former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is making a late play against Rep. Steve RussellSteven (Steve) Dane RussellThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority 5 themes to watch for in 2020 fight for House Oklahoma New Members 2019 MORE (R) — and Pennsylvania. Democrats are going to pick up a handful of seats in Pennsylvania, where the state Supreme Court ordered district maps redrawn earlier this year.

Voters in the District of Columbia are likely to reelect Mayor Muriel Bowser (D).

Delaware and Rhode Island start their vote counts at 8 p.m., too.

8:30 p.m. — The (French) Hill to Die On

Arkansas voters are likely to reelect Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R). The only truly competitive race here is in the state’s 2nd District, where Rep. French HillJames (French) French HillRestore Pell Grant eligibility to people in prison Here are the lawmakers who will forfeit their salaries during the shutdown Rep. French Hill wins after unexpected challenge MORE (R) faces a tough challenge from state Rep. Clarke Tucker (D). Hill is likely to win reelection, but the district has Democratic roots: Hill’s predecessor took over for Rep. Vic Snyder, a Democrat who held the Little Rock-based seat for 14 years.

9 p.m. — Go West, Young Man

The first Mountain West states start to close at this time, along with most of the Midwest.

Voters in Arizona, Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, Texas and Wisconsin are electing senators. Democrats are hopeful that Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D) can defeat a charging Rep. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallySenate Republicans running away from Alabama abortion law McSally to introduce military sexual assault reform bill Dem Senate campaign arm hits GOP lawmakers over Trump tax law MORE (R) in Arizona, while Republicans believe Rep. Kevin CramerKevin John CramerTrump's immigration push faces Capitol Hill buzzsaw Lawmakers introduce legislation to improve cyber workforce funding Kushner, Miller talk immigration at Senate GOP lunch MORE (R) will oust Heitkamp in North Dakota. And Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward Cruz Eye-popping number of Dems: I can beat Trump 'SleepyCreepy Joe' and 'Crazy Bernie': Trump seeks to define 2020 Dems with insults The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - Restrictive state abortion laws ignite fiery 2020 debate MORE (R) has a leg up on Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D), despite the Democrat’s absolutely mammoth fundraising performance.

New governors will be elected in Colorado, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, South Dakota and Wyoming, all states where the incumbents are termed out. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) is in the fight of his life, while Govs. Andrew Cuomo (D) of New York, Doug Ducey (R) of Arizona and Greg Abbott (R) of Texas are skating toward another term.

Democrats and Republicans are battling over House districts in Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Texas and Wisconsin.

Voters in Louisiana don’t have many competitive races to decide, but they shouldn’t feel left out: The race for governor in 2019 kicks off just as soon as the polls close on Tuesday.

10 p.m. — Defining the Wave

If a Democratic blue wave is forming, we’ll get a sense of how high it is when polls close in Iowa, Montana, Nevada and Utah.

Reps. Rod Blum (R) and David YoungDavid Edmund YoungIowa Republican ousted in 2018 says he will run to reclaim House seat The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority Anxiety grows in first tax season under Trump law MORE (R) face stiff challenges in Iowa, and both could lose without a tremendous wave breaking. But what about GOP Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingThirty-four GOP members buck Trump on disaster bill Overnight Energy — Presented by Job Creators Network — House Republican tries to force Green New Deal vote | 'Awkward' hearing to vet Interior nominee and watchdog | House panel approves bill to stop drilling in Arctic refuge Steve King: One 'good side' of climate change could be shrinking deserts MORE? While his district is much more conservative, King has become a lightning rod for associating himself with white supremacists across the country and around the world.

If Democrats are having a rough night in Senate races, this is the hour that will demonstrate just how bad it’s going: Their top target is Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerThis week: Barr back in hot seat over Mueller report Trump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary MORE (R-Nev.), who’s running even with Rep. Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenLawmakers introduce legislation to improve cyber workforce funding Dem lawmakers accuse DHS, HHS of giving them misleading information on family separations This week: Barr back in hot seat over Mueller report MORE (D) in most polls. Democrats are defending Sen. Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterGOP angst grows amid Trump trade war Overnight Defense — Presented by Huntington Ingalls Industries — Pentagon approves transfer of .5B to border wall | Dems blast move | House Dem pushes Pelosi to sue over Trump's Yemen veto Pentagon approves transfer of .5B to Trump border wall from Afghan forces, other accounts MORE (Mont.), who is in a surprisingly close and late-breaking race against state Auditor Matt Rosendale (R).

In Utah, Rep. Mia LoveLudmya (Mia) LoveCongressional Women's Softball team releases roster The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority Juan Williams: Racial shifts spark fury in Trump and his base MORE (R) finds herself in an unexpectedly tough battle; one poll shows her losing to Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams (D).

11 p.m. — The Best Coast

Polls close in four of the five states that touch the Pacific Ocean, along with Idaho.

Voters in California and Idaho are electing new governors. California voters, especially those in the Central Valley and Orange County, will decide the fates of a handful of endangered House Republicans.

In Washington, voters will decide a hard-fought contest for a congressional seat being vacated by Rep. Dave ReichertDavid (Dave) George ReichertLymphedema Treatment Act would provide a commonsense solution to a fixable problem Yoder, Messer land on K Street Ex-GOP lawmaker from Washington joins lobbying firm MORE (R). If voters are really in the mood for change, Reps. Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersThe GOP's commitment to electing talented women can help party retake the House McCain and Dingell: Inspiring a stronger Congress Regulators implore Congress for more privacy powers MORE (R) and Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerDems push to revive Congress' tech office Bill allowing Congress to hire Dreamers advances House fails to override Trump veto on border wall MORE (R) could also have uncomfortable nights — remember, no state kicked out more Democratic incumbents in the 1994 GOP wave than Washington.

Republicans have one more shot for an upset, this time in Oregon, where Gov. Kate Brown (D) is in a more difficult than expected battle for reelection.

Hawaii voters are likely to reelect Gov. David Ige (D) and send former Rep. Ed Case (D) back to Congress.

1 a.m. — The Aleutian Solution

The vast majority of polling places in Alaska close at midnight Eastern time, but seven hours after the first polls close in Kentucky, voters in parts of the Aleutian Islands will cast the final ballots of the 2018 general election.

Alaska voters will elect a new governor, after Gov. Bill Walker (I) dropped his reelection bid late last month. And one recent poll showed the dean of the House, Rep. Don YoungDonald (Don) Edwin YoungCongress: Pass legislation that invests in America's water future Bipartisan group introduces legislation to protect federal workers' health benefits during shutdowns Deceptions may sink plans to drill for oil in the Arctic Refuge MORE (R), in trouble against education activist Alyse Galvin (D).