Election Day: An hour-by-hour viewer’s guide

For a solid hour on Tuesday, all eyes will be trained on Lexington, Ky., and its suburbs, where Rep. Andy BarrGarland (Andy) Hale BarrTop 5 races to watch in 2019 GOP seeks to ram through Trump’s B wall demand Election Countdown: Florida fight ends with Scott, DeSantis wins | Dems see Sunbelt in play for 2020 | Trump to campaign in Mississippi ahead of runoff | GOP wipeout in Orange County | Ortiz Jones concedes in Texas House race MORE (R) is running for reelection against retired Marine Lt. Col. Amy McGrath (D).

That’s because Kentucky closes its polling places at 6 p.m. local time — and Barr’s 6th District is the only competitive race based entirely within the Eastern time zone.

Here’s an hour-by-hour look at how Election Day will unfold, and what to watch as the polls close.

6 p.m. Eastern — The Canary in Coal Country

Barr represents a district that voted for President TrumpDonald John TrumpVeterans groups demand end to shutdown: 'Get your act together' Brown launches tour in four early nominating states amid 2020 consideration Pence on border wall: Trump won't be ‘deterred’ by Dem ‘obstruction’ MORE by a 15-point margin in 2016 — but it’s a seat with Democratic roots, one long held by former Rep. Ben Chandler (D). If McGrath pulls off an early upset, Republicans are likely going to have a very bad night. But if Barr hangs on, as polling indicates, the GOP’s House majority is still in play.

7 p.m. — The First Hints

Six states close their polling places at 7 p.m., from liberal Vermont to conservative South Carolina, and the rest of Kentucky.

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Vote-counting will begin in two of the hottest races in the country: Georgia’s gubernatorial race, a fierce battle between Secretary of State Brian Kemp (R) and state House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams (D), and Indiana’s Senate race, where Sen. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyEPA's Wheeler faces grilling over rule rollbacks Some Senate Dems see Ocasio-Cortez as weak spokeswoman for party Senate approves funding bill, preventing partial government shutdown MORE (D) faces former state Rep. Mike Braun (R).

If Donnelly loses quickly, it would augur poorly for other red-state Democratic senators. But if he prevails, Sens. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Trump AG pick Barr grilled at hearing | Judge rules against census citizenship question | McConnell blocks second House bill to reopen government Ex-Sen. McCaskill joins NBC, MSNBC Some Senate Dems see Ocasio-Cortez as weak spokeswoman for party MORE (D-Mo.) and Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampEPA's Wheeler faces grilling over rule rollbacks 2020 Election: Democrats can’t afford to ignore their Israel problem Hirono will donate salary earned during government shutdown MORE (D-N.D.) may find reason for optimism.

In Virginia, voters in the Richmond suburbs and Norfolk will reveal some of the first hints of the size of the Democratic advantage in the House. GOP Reps. Scott TaylorScott William TaylorEx-GOP Rep. Ryan Costello joins group pushing carbon tax Virginia New Members 2019 Overnight Defense — Presented by Raytheon — First lady's office pushes for ouster of national security aide | Trump taps retired general as ambassador to Saudis | Mattis to visit border troops | Record number of female veterans to serve in Congress MORE and Dave Brat have tough fights on their hands, and a Democrat is even making a run at outgoing Rep. Tom GarrettThomas (Tom) Alexander GarrettEthics investigation finds outgoing House Republican made staff unload groceries, dog-sit Trump signs bill naming post office after soldier whose parents he attacked Congress sends president bill to name post office after soldier whose parents Trump disparaged MORE’s (R) seat. If Democrats take two of those, the Republican majority is probably gone.

7:30 p.m. — A Blue Moon and a Blue Dog

Polls close in North Carolina, Ohio and West Virginia at this time. Two red-state Senate Democrats will see their fates decided: Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownBrown launches tour in four early nominating states amid 2020 consideration Pro-Trump group doing opposition research on Sherrod Brown’s wife: report Press: White House not only for white males MORE (Ohio) is likely to cruise to reelection, and Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinLeaders nix recess with no shutdown deal in sight EPA's Wheeler faces grilling over rule rollbacks The Hill's Morning Report — No new negotiations as shutdown hits 25 days MORE (W.Va.) is favored to win, but in a much tighter race.

Democrats will get the first signs of their ability to flip Republican-held governorships across the Midwest when Ohio begins counting its ballots. Former state Attorney General Richard CordrayRichard Adams CordraySupreme Court should do what Congress won’t: Rein in the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection Congress must restrain power of new consumer financial director Five challenges facing new consumer bureau chief MORE (D), who was later head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in Washington, is fighting his successor, Mike DeWine (R), for the right to succeed term-limited Gov. John Kasich (R).

North Carolina experiences what they call a "blue moon" election, a rare year in which neither the governor nor a senator is on the ballot. That probably means lower turnout, but Democrats are running surprisingly strong races against Reps. George HoldingGeorge Edward Bell HoldingElection Day: An hour-by-hour viewer’s guide Jockeying already stepping up in House leadership fights The importance of advancing the U.S.-India partnership MORE (R) and Ted BuddTheodore (Ted) Paul BuddRepublican Ted Budd holds off challenger to win reelection in North Carolina Election Day: An hour-by-hour viewer’s guide Jockeying already stepping up in House leadership fights MORE (R), and for a seat held by Rep. Robert PittengerRobert Miller PittengerFight over North Carolina race set to drag on for months NC GOP calls on board to certify House race unless it can prove fraud changed results North Carolina on cusp of House race reset MORE (R), who lost his primary.

8 p.m. — The Big Enchilada

Sixteen states and the District of Columbia are done voting by 8 p.m. Eastern, including a handful of states that will give a fuller picture of the electorate’s mood.

Governor’s races will be decided in Alabama, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Tennessee.

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The biggest prize for Democrats would be in Florida, scene of a nasty battle between Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum (D) and former Rep. Ron DeSantisRonald Dion DeSantisFlorida governor announces sheriff's suspension over Parkland shooting DeSantis asks entire South Florida water management board to resign Rick Scott threw party at Florida governor’s mansion after DeSantis and family had moved in: report MORE (R). In Connecticut, businessman Bob Stefanowski (R) is running a particularly tough race against progressive hero Ned Lamont (D). Expect Govs. Charlie Baker (R) of Massachusetts and Larry Hogan (R) of Maryland to win reelection easily, thanks to ticket-splitters who will also reelect Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenBrown launches tour in four early nominating states amid 2020 consideration Gillibrand announces exploratory committee to run for president on Colbert Native American group denounces Trump for using Wounded Knee in attack against Warren MORE (D-Mass.) and Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinLeaders nix recess with no shutdown deal in sight McConnell blocks House bill to reopen government for second time Senators restart shutdown talks — and quickly hit roadblocks MORE (D-Md.).

Vote-counting also begins in key Senate races in Florida, Missouri, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Tennessee. In Mississippi, expect Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R) and former Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy (D) to head to a late November runoff.

The House battleground expands to Democratic targets in Florida, Illinois, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Oklahoma — where a PAC linked to former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is making a late play against Rep. Steve RussellSteven (Steve) Dane Russell5 themes to watch for in 2020 fight for House Oklahoma New Members 2019 Overnight Defense — Presented by Raytheon — First lady's office pushes for ouster of national security aide | Trump taps retired general as ambassador to Saudis | Mattis to visit border troops | Record number of female veterans to serve in Congress MORE (R) — and Pennsylvania. Democrats are going to pick up a handful of seats in Pennsylvania, where the state Supreme Court ordered district maps redrawn earlier this year.

Voters in the District of Columbia are likely to reelect Mayor Muriel Bowser (D).

Delaware and Rhode Island start their vote counts at 8 p.m., too.

8:30 p.m. — The (French) Hill to Die On

Arkansas voters are likely to reelect Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R). The only truly competitive race here is in the state’s 2nd District, where Rep. French HillJames (French) French HillHere are the lawmakers who will forfeit their salaries during the shutdown Rep. French Hill wins after unexpected challenge Election Day: An hour-by-hour viewer’s guide MORE (R) faces a tough challenge from state Rep. Clarke Tucker (D). Hill is likely to win reelection, but the district has Democratic roots: Hill’s predecessor took over for Rep. Vic Snyder, a Democrat who held the Little Rock-based seat for 14 years.

9 p.m. — Go West, Young Man

The first Mountain West states start to close at this time, along with most of the Midwest.

Voters in Arizona, Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, Texas and Wisconsin are electing senators. Democrats are hopeful that Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D) can defeat a charging Rep. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyOvernight Defense: Trump faces blowback over report he discussed leaving NATO | Pentagon extends mission on border | Senate advances measure bucking Trump on Russia sanctions Senate advances measure bucking Trump on Russia sanctions 116th Congress breaks records for women, minority lawmakers MORE (R) in Arizona, while Republicans believe Rep. Kevin CramerKevin John CramerHopes fade for bipartisan bills in age of confrontation GOP senators propose bill to pay 'excepted' workers during shutdown Senators say questions remain on Trump strategy in Syria after briefing MORE (R) will oust Heitkamp in North Dakota. And Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward Cruz5 takeaways from Barr’s testimony Republicans seek to temper fallout from latest Russia bombshells Cruz says Americans outside Beltway unconcerned with Mueller investigation MORE (R) has a leg up on Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D), despite the Democrat’s absolutely mammoth fundraising performance.

New governors will be elected in Colorado, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, South Dakota and Wyoming, all states where the incumbents are termed out. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) is in the fight of his life, while Govs. Andrew Cuomo (D) of New York, Doug Ducey (R) of Arizona and Greg Abbott (R) of Texas are skating toward another term.

Democrats and Republicans are battling over House districts in Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Texas and Wisconsin.

Voters in Louisiana don’t have many competitive races to decide, but they shouldn’t feel left out: The race for governor in 2019 kicks off just as soon as the polls close on Tuesday.

10 p.m. — Defining the Wave

If a Democratic blue wave is forming, we’ll get a sense of how high it is when polls close in Iowa, Montana, Nevada and Utah.

Reps. Rod Blum (R) and David YoungDavid Edmund YoungIowa New Members 2019 McCarthy defeats Jordan for minority leader in 159-to-43 vote Dem Axne beats GOP Rep. Young in Iowa MORE (R) face stiff challenges in Iowa, and both could lose without a tremendous wave breaking. But what about GOP Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingKing rips GOP leadership after criticism over 'white supremacist' remarks House vote fails to quell storm surrounding Steve King Des Moines Register calls on Steve King to resign MORE? While his district is much more conservative, King has become a lightning rod for associating himself with white supremacists across the country and around the world.

If Democrats are having a rough night in Senate races, this is the hour that will demonstrate just how bad it’s going: Their top target is Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerTrump’s shifting Cabinet to introduce new faces Trump's most memorable insults and nicknames of 2018 Progressive strategist says changing demographics will help Dems MORE (R-Nev.), who’s running even with Rep. Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenInflux of women in Congress can improve women’s retirement security Overnight Health Care: DOJ seeks extension in ObamaCare lawsuit due to shutdown | Poll finds voters oppose court ruling against health law Press: White House not only for white males MORE (D) in most polls. Democrats are defending Sen. Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterSome Senate Dems see Ocasio-Cortez as weak spokeswoman for party Three GOP Senate candidates, NRA may have illegally coordinated ads: report Immigration is pressure point for both sides in shutdown showdown MORE (Mont.), who is in a surprisingly close and late-breaking race against state Auditor Matt Rosendale (R).

In Utah, Rep. Mia LoveLudmya (Mia) LoveWomen’s equality not just ‘firsts’ CBS News in talks to hire Flake: report Former reps Mia Love, Luis Gutiérrez join CNN as commentators MORE (R) finds herself in an unexpectedly tough battle; one poll shows her losing to Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams (D).

11 p.m. — The Best Coast

Polls close in four of the five states that touch the Pacific Ocean, along with Idaho.

Voters in California and Idaho are electing new governors. California voters, especially those in the Central Valley and Orange County, will decide the fates of a handful of endangered House Republicans.

In Washington, voters will decide a hard-fought contest for a congressional seat being vacated by Rep. Dave ReichertDavid (Dave) George ReichertYoder, Messer land on K Street Ex-GOP lawmaker from Washington joins lobbying firm Outgoing GOP rep says law enforcement, not Congress should conduct investigations MORE (R). If voters are really in the mood for change, Reps. Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersWashington governor announces killer whale recovery plan ‘Wake up, dudes’ — gender gap confounds GOP women The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by T-Mobile — House, Senate leaders named as Pelosi lobbies for support to be Speaker MORE (R) and Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerLatest funding bill to reopen the government fails in House On The Money: Trump says he won't declare emergency 'so fast' | Shutdown poised to become longest in history | Congress approves back pay for workers | More federal unions sue over shutdown Overnight Energy: House votes to reopen Interior, EPA | Dems question EPA over Wheeler confirmation prep | Virginia Dem backs Green New Deal MORE (R) could also have uncomfortable nights — remember, no state kicked out more Democratic incumbents in the 1994 GOP wave than Washington.

Republicans have one more shot for an upset, this time in Oregon, where Gov. Kate Brown (D) is in a more difficult than expected battle for reelection.

Hawaii voters are likely to reelect Gov. David Ige (D) and send former Rep. Ed Case (D) back to Congress.

1 a.m. — The Aleutian Solution

The vast majority of polling places in Alaska close at midnight Eastern time, but seven hours after the first polls close in Kentucky, voters in parts of the Aleutian Islands will cast the final ballots of the 2018 general election.

Alaska voters will elect a new governor, after Gov. Bill Walker (I) dropped his reelection bid late last month. And one recent poll showed the dean of the House, Rep. Don YoungDonald (Don) Edwin YoungLive coverage: House elects new Speaker as Dems take charge Inside the Trump-Congress Christmas meltdown House GOP and Puerto Rico governor agree on statehood vote MORE (R), in trouble against education activist Alyse Galvin (D).