Election Day: An hour-by-hour viewer’s guide

For a solid hour on Tuesday, all eyes will be trained on Lexington, Ky., and its suburbs, where Rep. Andy BarrAndy Hale BarrKentucky Democrat moves closer to McConnell challenge Advocates step up efforts for horse racing reform bill after more deaths Unlikely allies push horse racing reform MORE (R) is running for reelection against retired Marine Lt. Col. Amy McGrath (D).

That’s because Kentucky closes its polling places at 6 p.m. local time — and Barr’s 6th District is the only competitive race based entirely within the Eastern time zone.

Here’s an hour-by-hour look at how Election Day will unfold, and what to watch as the polls close.

6 p.m. Eastern — The Canary in Coal Country

Barr represents a district that voted for President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - Diplomats kick off public evidence about Trump, Ukraine Trump faces high stakes in meeting with Erdoğan amid impeachment drama Democrats worry they don't have right candidate to beat Trump MORE by a 15-point margin in 2016 — but it’s a seat with Democratic roots, one long held by former Rep. Ben Chandler (D). If McGrath pulls off an early upset, Republicans are likely going to have a very bad night. But if Barr hangs on, as polling indicates, the GOP’s House majority is still in play.

7 p.m. — The First Hints

Six states close their polling places at 7 p.m., from liberal Vermont to conservative South Carolina, and the rest of Kentucky.

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Vote-counting will begin in two of the hottest races in the country: Georgia’s gubernatorial race, a fierce battle between Secretary of State Brian Kemp (R) and state House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams (D), and Indiana’s Senate race, where Sen. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyWatchdog accuses pro-Kavanaugh group of sending illegal robotexts in 2018 Lobbying world Trump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand MORE (D) faces former state Rep. Mike Braun (R).

If Donnelly loses quickly, it would augur poorly for other red-state Democratic senators. But if he prevails, Sens. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillGOP senator rips into Pelosi at Trump rally: 'It must suck to be that dumb' Iranian attacks expose vulnerability of campaign email accounts Ex-CIA chief worries campaigns falling short on cybersecurity MORE (D-Mo.) and Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampThe Hill's Morning Report — Biden steadies in third debate as top tier remains the same Trump wins 60 percent approval in rural areas of key states Pence to push new NAFTA deal in visit to Iowa MORE (D-N.D.) may find reason for optimism.

In Virginia, voters in the Richmond suburbs and Norfolk will reveal some of the first hints of the size of the Democratic advantage in the House. GOP Reps. Scott TaylorScott William TaylorDemocratic lawmaker invites Republican to town hall after he accuses her of dodging voters on impeachment Former GOP rep launches Senate campaign in Virginia Virginia special prosecutor indicts former GOP campaign staffer MORE and Dave Brat have tough fights on their hands, and a Democrat is even making a run at outgoing Rep. Tom GarrettThomas (Tom) Alexander GarrettLiberty University official to launch primary challenge to GOP's Riggleman Female Dems see double standard in Klobuchar accusations Ethics investigation finds outgoing House Republican made staff unload groceries, dog-sit MORE’s (R) seat. If Democrats take two of those, the Republican majority is probably gone.

7:30 p.m. — A Blue Moon and a Blue Dog

Polls close in North Carolina, Ohio and West Virginia at this time. Two red-state Senate Democrats will see their fates decided: Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownSunday shows — New impeachment phase dominates Brown confirms he won't enter 2020 race: 'I think it's a good field' GM officially sells Ohio plant, months after Trump touted sale MORE (Ohio) is likely to cruise to reelection, and Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinFormer coal exec Don Blankenship launches third-party presidential bid Centrist Democrats seize on state election wins to rail against Warren's agenda Overnight Energy: Senate eyes nixing 'forever chemicals' fix from defense bill | Former Obama EPA chief named CEO of green group | Senate reviews Interior, FERC nominees criticized on ethics MORE (W.Va.) is favored to win, but in a much tighter race.

Democrats will get the first signs of their ability to flip Republican-held governorships across the Midwest when Ohio begins counting its ballots. Former state Attorney General Richard CordrayRichard Adams CordrayDemocrats jump into Trump turf war over student loans Supreme Court agrees to hear challenge to consumer agency On The Money: Tax, loan documents for Trump properties reportedly showed inconsistencies | Tensions flare as Dems hammer Trump consumer chief | Critics pounce as Facebook crypto project stumbles MORE (D), who was later head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in Washington, is fighting his successor, Mike DeWine (R), for the right to succeed term-limited Gov. John Kasich (R).

North Carolina experiences what they call a "blue moon" election, a rare year in which neither the governor nor a senator is on the ballot. That probably means lower turnout, but Democrats are running surprisingly strong races against Reps. George HoldingGeorge Edward Bell HoldingNorth Carolina ruling could cost GOP House seats House committee advances measure taxing nicotine in vaping products Betsy DeVos's playbook of political correctness MORE (R) and Ted BuddTheodore (Ted) Paul BuddNorth Carolina ruling could cost GOP House seats SEC reforms will save job creators time and money Girls Little League softball champions get invitation to White House MORE (R), and for a seat held by Rep. Robert PittengerRobert Miller PittengerBottom Line North Carolina reporter says there could be 'new crop' of GOP candidates in 9th Congressional District race North Carolina board calls for new election in contested House race MORE (R), who lost his primary.

8 p.m. — The Big Enchilada

Sixteen states and the District of Columbia are done voting by 8 p.m. Eastern, including a handful of states that will give a fuller picture of the electorate’s mood.

Governor’s races will be decided in Alabama, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Tennessee.

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The biggest prize for Democrats would be in Florida, scene of a nasty battle between Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum (D) and former Rep. Ron DeSantisRonald Dion DeSantisSaagar Enjeti: Republicans lost Kentucky by failing to appeal to working class Saagar Enjeti: Republicans lost Kentucky by screwing the working class Burr promises bill to tax scholarships of student athletes who profit off their likenesses MORE (R). In Connecticut, businessman Bob Stefanowski (R) is running a particularly tough race against progressive hero Ned Lamont (D). Expect Govs. Charlie Baker (R) of Massachusetts and Larry Hogan (R) of Maryland to win reelection easily, thanks to ticket-splitters who will also reelect Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenThe Hill's Morning Report - Diplomats kick off public evidence about Trump, Ukraine Democrats worry they don't have right candidate to beat Trump Overnight Energy: BLM staff face choice of relocation or resignation as agency moves | Trump says he's 'very much into climate' | EPA rule would expand limits on scientific studies MORE (D-Mass.) and Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinOvernight Health Care: Democratic gains mark setback for Trump on Medicaid work requirements | Senate Dems give Warren 'Medicare for All' plan the cold shoulder | Judge strikes Trump rule on health care 'conscience' rights Democrats give Warren's 'Medicare for All' plan the cold shoulder Former NAACP president to run for Cummings's House seat MORE (D-Md.).

Vote-counting also begins in key Senate races in Florida, Missouri, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Tennessee. In Mississippi, expect Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R) and former Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy (D) to head to a late November runoff.

The House battleground expands to Democratic targets in Florida, Illinois, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Oklahoma — where a PAC linked to former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is making a late play against Rep. Steve RussellSteven (Steve) Dane RussellThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority 5 themes to watch for in 2020 fight for House Oklahoma New Members 2019 MORE (R) — and Pennsylvania. Democrats are going to pick up a handful of seats in Pennsylvania, where the state Supreme Court ordered district maps redrawn earlier this year.

Voters in the District of Columbia are likely to reelect Mayor Muriel Bowser (D).

Delaware and Rhode Island start their vote counts at 8 p.m., too.

8:30 p.m. — The (French) Hill to Die On

Arkansas voters are likely to reelect Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R). The only truly competitive race here is in the state’s 2nd District, where Rep. French HillJames (French) French HillAn unintended burden on small businesses A true believer in diversity, inclusion Restore Pell Grant eligibility to people in prison MORE (R) faces a tough challenge from state Rep. Clarke Tucker (D). Hill is likely to win reelection, but the district has Democratic roots: Hill’s predecessor took over for Rep. Vic Snyder, a Democrat who held the Little Rock-based seat for 14 years.

9 p.m. — Go West, Young Man

The first Mountain West states start to close at this time, along with most of the Midwest.

Voters in Arizona, Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, Texas and Wisconsin are electing senators. Democrats are hopeful that Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D) can defeat a charging Rep. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyThis week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry Progressive veterans group launches campaign labeling Trump as a 'national security threat' Advocates step up efforts for horse racing reform bill after more deaths MORE (R) in Arizona, while Republicans believe Rep. Kevin CramerKevin John CramerGOP senators plan to tune out impeachment week Trump encounters GOP resistance to investigating Hunter Biden Progressive freshmen jump into leadership PAC fundraising MORE (R) will oust Heitkamp in North Dakota. And Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTrump circuit court nominee in jeopardy amid GOP opposition Trump has officially appointed one in four circuit court judges On The Money: Retirement savings bill blocked in Senate after fight over amendments | Stopgap bill may set up December spending fight | Hardwood industry pleads for relief from Trump trade war MORE (R) has a leg up on Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D), despite the Democrat’s absolutely mammoth fundraising performance.

New governors will be elected in Colorado, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, South Dakota and Wyoming, all states where the incumbents are termed out. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) is in the fight of his life, while Govs. Andrew Cuomo (D) of New York, Doug Ducey (R) of Arizona and Greg Abbott (R) of Texas are skating toward another term.

Democrats and Republicans are battling over House districts in Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Texas and Wisconsin.

Voters in Louisiana don’t have many competitive races to decide, but they shouldn’t feel left out: The race for governor in 2019 kicks off just as soon as the polls close on Tuesday.

10 p.m. — Defining the Wave

If a Democratic blue wave is forming, we’ll get a sense of how high it is when polls close in Iowa, Montana, Nevada and Utah.

Reps. Rod Blum (R) and David YoungDavid Edmund YoungFormer 'Apprentice' contestant ranks Trump next to Mother Teresa on women's issues Churches are arming and training congregants in response to mass shootings: report Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress MORE (R) face stiff challenges in Iowa, and both could lose without a tremendous wave breaking. But what about GOP Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingWhy the GOP march of mad hatters poses a threat to our Democracy MSNBC's Donny Deutsch: 'Pathetic' Republicans who stormed closed hearing are 'boring, nerdy-looking white guys' Overnight Defense: Trump lifts sanctions on Turkey | 'Small number' of troops to remain by Syrian oil fields | Defense official's impeachment testimony delayed five hours after Republicans storm secure room MORE? While his district is much more conservative, King has become a lightning rod for associating himself with white supremacists across the country and around the world.

If Democrats are having a rough night in Senate races, this is the hour that will demonstrate just how bad it’s going: Their top target is Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerThis week: Barr back in hot seat over Mueller report Trump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary MORE (R-Nev.), who’s running even with Rep. Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenHillicon Valley: Facebook to remove mentions of potential whistleblower's name | House Dems demand FCC action over leak of location data | Dem presses regulators to secure health care data Senators introduce bill to create 'parity' among broadband programs Senators introduce cybersecurity workforce expansion bill MORE (D) in most polls. Democrats are defending Sen. Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterOvernight Defense: Protests at Trump's NYC Veterans Day speech | House Dems release Pentagon official's deposition transcript | Lawmakers ask Trump to rescind Erdogan invite Overnight Defense: Top diplomat changes testimony to indicate quid pro quo | Dem offers measure on Turkish human rights abuses in Syria | Warren offers plan to address veteran suicide rates Manchin says he wouldn't back Sanders against Trump in presidential race MORE (Mont.), who is in a surprisingly close and late-breaking race against state Auditor Matt Rosendale (R).

In Utah, Rep. Mia LoveLudmya (Mia) LoveFormer GOP lawmaker: Trump's tweets have to stop Congressional Women's Softball team releases roster The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority MORE (R) finds herself in an unexpectedly tough battle; one poll shows her losing to Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams (D).

11 p.m. — The Best Coast

Polls close in four of the five states that touch the Pacific Ocean, along with Idaho.

Voters in California and Idaho are electing new governors. California voters, especially those in the Central Valley and Orange County, will decide the fates of a handful of endangered House Republicans.

In Washington, voters will decide a hard-fought contest for a congressional seat being vacated by Rep. Dave ReichertDavid (Dave) George ReichertLymphedema Treatment Act would provide a commonsense solution to a fixable problem Yoder, Messer land on K Street Ex-GOP lawmaker from Washington joins lobbying firm MORE (R). If voters are really in the mood for change, Reps. Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersShimkus announces he will stick with plan to retire after reconsidering Bipartisan group reveals agricultural worker immigration bill DC's liaison to rock 'n' roll MORE (R) and Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerGOP lawmakers offer new election security measure GOP group calls out five House Republicans to speak up on Ukraine Dems push to revive Congress' tech office MORE (R) could also have uncomfortable nights — remember, no state kicked out more Democratic incumbents in the 1994 GOP wave than Washington.

Republicans have one more shot for an upset, this time in Oregon, where Gov. Kate Brown (D) is in a more difficult than expected battle for reelection.

Hawaii voters are likely to reelect Gov. David Ige (D) and send former Rep. Ed Case (D) back to Congress.

1 a.m. — The Aleutian Solution

The vast majority of polling places in Alaska close at midnight Eastern time, but seven hours after the first polls close in Kentucky, voters in parts of the Aleutian Islands will cast the final ballots of the 2018 general election.

Alaska voters will elect a new governor, after Gov. Bill Walker (I) dropped his reelection bid late last month. And one recent poll showed the dean of the House, Rep. Don YoungDonald (Don) Edwin YoungThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems release first transcripts from impeachment probe witnesses GOP lawmaker head-butts MoveOn camera Hundreds turn out for London's first transgender equality march MORE (R), in trouble against education activist Alyse Galvin (D).