Age becomes talking point surrounding 2020 Democratic field

Age becomes talking point surrounding 2020 Democratic field
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It's a question some Democrats are pondering as the 2020 presidential election inches closer: Can their party represent change when three of its top candidates are not only familiar faces, but people in their retirement years? 

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenDem lawmaker says Electoral College was 'conceived' as way to perpetuate slavery GOP rep to introduce constitutional amendment to limit Supreme Court seats to 9 Warren introduces petition to end the Electoral College MORE (Mass.) will enter her 70s in June. Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersAlan Dershowitz: In defense of Chelsea Clinton O'Rourke: Decisions on late-term abortions 'best left to a woman and her doctor' CNN to host town hall with Cory Booker in South Carolina MORE (I-Vt.) is 77. Former Vice President Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenTrump: 'I was never a fan of John McCain and I never will be' Poll: Biden rises to 8-point lead over Sanders among Democratic primary voters Andrew Yang draws crowd of 3,000 in San Francisco MORE will turn 76 later this month. 

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Though the primaries are still a ways off, all three have emerged in early polls as favorites to be the 2020 Democratic nominee. 

Some strategists say that might be a problem.

“Democrats would be better off with a young candidate,” said Democratic strategist Brad Bannon, who argued that an electorate that seems to want change might prefer someone from a younger generation. 

He put it as a generational battle, this time between baby boomers and millennials. 

“The desire for change is a function of a battle between an ascending generation, the millennials who want political power, and a descending generation, the baby boomers, who have the power but don't want to give it up,” he said.

There are certainly a number of candidates ready to step up if Democratic voters are looking for a younger nominee. 

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisGOP rep to introduce constitutional amendment to limit Supreme Court seats to 9 CNN to host town hall with Cory Booker in South Carolina O'Rourke sees 'a lot of wisdom' in abolishing Electoral College MORE (Calif.), a freshman in the Senate, is 54. Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerCNN to host town hall with Cory Booker in South Carolina O'Rourke sees 'a lot of wisdom' in abolishing Electoral College Gillibrand: Aide who claimed sexual harassment was 'believed' MORE of New Jersey is 49, while Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandGOP rep to introduce constitutional amendment to limit Supreme Court seats to 9 Senate Dems petition Saudi king to release dissidents, US citizen Howard Schultz to be featured in Fox News town hall MORE is 51. 

Rep. Beto O’Rourke, who has sparkled as a challenger to GOP Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzO'Rourke: Decisions on late-term abortions 'best left to a woman and her doctor' New report details O'Rourke's prankish past O'Rourke sees 'a lot of wisdom' in abolishing Electoral College MORE and become a liberal fundraising force, is 46. 

None of those candidates would qualify as millennials, but they are from a different generation than the trio at the top of the Democratic polls.

Earlier this year, Biden — who allies suggest may consider running for one term only — acknowledged that age is a “legitimate” issue for presidential candidates.

“I think it’s totally appropriate for people to look at me and say if I were to run for office again, ‘Well, God darn you’re old.’ Well, chronologically, I am old,” Biden said during a question and answer session at the Economic Club of Southwestern Michigan’s Speakers Series last month, according to CNN. 

“Every voter is entitled to know exactly what kind of shape you’re in. You owe it to them. It’s a legitimate question and so I think age is relevant.” 

But some Democrats say the 2020 election won't be so much about age at all, particularly when Democrats will be competing to take on the 72-year-old President TrumpDonald John TrumpDem lawmaker says Electoral College was 'conceived' as way to perpetuate slavery Stanley Cup champion Washington Capitals to visit White House on Monday Transportation Dept requests formal audit of Boeing 737 Max certification MORE

“To me, it's less about years of age and more about the age of your ideas and whether your ideas reflect what voters want to hear,” said Chris Kofinis, a Democratic strategist.

Still, he said that could be a problem for some candidates.

“The challenge with candidates like Sanders and Biden is that they've been around so long. Anytime a party is out of office it is attracted to a newer, bolder message.” 

Democratic strategist Maria Cardona said she doesn’t think the age of some would-be candidates is problematic for the party. 

Cardona pointed to 2016, when Sanders was “able to attract a massive following of young people,” and nearly beat Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDem lawmaker says Electoral College was 'conceived' as way to perpetuate slavery Dem strategist says Donna Brazile is joining Fox News 'for the money' CNN to host town hall with Cory Booker in South Carolina MORE in the Democratic primary. 

Sanders was able to tap into a sentiment that Clinton represented the tired Washington establishment, and he positively electrified swaths of young voters. 

During that race, the Vermont senator lured millennials to the race by talking about issues such as free public college, single-payer health care and campaign finance reform. 

A survey conducted in early 2016 by pollster Frank Luntz showed that young voters selected Sanders when asked which politician they respected the most. Sanders even beat former President Obama, who at 57 is 20 years his junior, 31 percent to 18 percent, according to the poll.  

“I think what’s important more than age is for the candidates to authentically speak to and make a connection with voters in every state and in every community and offer a platform of new ideas and real solutions for the problems the country is facing,” Cardona said. 

Kofinis said that whoever wins will need to run a nimble, 21st century campaign that doesn’t rely on a playbook from previous years. 

“It’s not going to be the age of the candidate but the age of their ideas and the age of their actual campaign,” he said. 

One Democratic strategist said Warren’s recent release of her DNA test results fell into that category, “because it wasn’t anything a modern campaign would do. It was so incredibly reactive and pissed off so many Democrats.” 

“If you didn’t understand how bad of an idea that was, you’ll probably be on a losing campaign,” the strategist said. 

Much of what happens in the 2020 race is dependent on what happens in Tuesday’s midterms, strategists said. 

If Democrats take over the House, strategists predict the party will look a lot younger and more diverse and age will be nothing but a number. 

“If and when we take over the House on Tuesday, there will be a whole new generation of Democrats in Congress as well as across state legislatures around the country,” Cardona said. “They will be more female, young, diverse, and beautifully reflective of the country we live in today."