Trump Jr. refers to ‘tired old’ Pelosi in campaign ad

Trump Jr. refers to ‘tired old’ Pelosi in campaign ad
© Anna Moneymaker

Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpTrump's son attacks LGBT magazine op-ed that calls effort to decriminalize homosexuality 'racist' Gillibrand uses Trump Jr. tweet to fundraise Trump has publicly criticized Russia probe more than 1,100 times: NY Times MORE refers to House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiWhy Omar’s views are dangerous Pelosi asks members to support resolution against emergency declaration Overnight Defense: Graham clashed with Pentagon chief over Syria | Talk grows that Trump will fire Coats | Coast Guard officer accused of domestic terrorism plot MORE (D-Calif.) as "tired old Nancy Pelosi" in a new campaign ad for Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the American Academy of HIV Medicine — Trump, Congress prepare for new border wall fight Winners and losers in the border security deal GOP braces for Trump's emergency declaration MORE (R-N.C.).

"If you don't vote, the Democrats will take control of Congress and tired old Nancy Pelosi will take the gavel in the House of Representatives, where she'll try to impeach my father and Justice Kavanaugh and enact her radical, socialist agenda of government-run health care, high taxes and gun bans," Trump says in the radio ad, as reported in Politico Playbook on Sunday.

Pelosi is a frequent target for Republicans, who have made her a boogeywoman in the Democratic agenda.

ADVERTISEMENT

Politico reported that the president's son is working overtime to rally voters for House GOP.

Trump Jr. will go to 6 rallies on Monday alone, to push Republicans to get out and vote in battleground races. 

In the week running up to the midterms, Trump Jr. campaigned in Nevada for Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerTrump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds MORE, gubernatorial nominee Adam Laxalt, and House candidates in Nevada.

Trump Jr. urged voters in Arizona to fight for Rep. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyArmy calls base housing hazards 'unconscionable,' details steps to protect families Poll shows McSally, Kelly tied in Arizona Senate race Mark Kelly's campaign raises over M in days after launching Senate bid MORE (R) in her hotly contested Senate race against Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D).

He also went to North Dakota to advocate for Rep. Kevin CramerKevin John CramerSenators highlight threat from invasive species Overnight Defense: Top general wasn't consulted on Syria withdrawal | Senate passes bill breaking with Trump on Syria | What to watch for in State of the Union | US, South Korea reach deal on troop costs GOP senators think Trump would win vote on emergency declaration MORE in his race for Sen. Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampOvernight Energy: Trump taps ex-oil lobbyist Bernhardt to lead Interior | Bernhardt slams Obama officials for agency's ethics issues | Head of major green group steps down Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary On The Money: Shutdown Day 27 | Trump fires back at Pelosi by canceling her foreign travel | Dems blast 'petty' move | Trump also cancels delegation to Davos | House votes to disapprove of Trump lifting Russia sanction MORE's (D) seat.

Most forecasters and polls predict that the GOP will hold its majority in the Senate and lose its hold on the House in Tuesday's midterm elections.

FiveThirtyEight gives Republicans a 5 in 6 shot at keeping the Senate and a 1 in 7 chance of holding the House.

However, as FiveThirtyEight's Nate Silver noted, the Republicans could still cling onto the House.

"The range of outcomes in the House is really wide," Silver told ABC's "This Week."

"No one should be surprised if [Democrats] only win 19 seats and no one should be surprised if they win 51 seats," Silver said, noting that Democrats have to take 23 seats in the House to gain a majority.

"Those are both extremely possible, based on how accurate polls are in the real world."