Trump Jr. refers to ‘tired old’ Pelosi in campaign ad

Trump Jr. refers to ‘tired old’ Pelosi in campaign ad
© Anna Moneymaker

Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpHillicon Valley: Cyber, tech takeaways from Mueller report | Millions of Instagram passwords exposed internally by Facebook | DHS unrolling facial recognition tech in airports | Uber unveils new safety measures after student's killing Heavily redacted Mueller report leaves major questions unanswered Mueller considered charging campaign aides in Trump Tower meeting but lacked evidence MORE refers to House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiBoth sides were wrong about Mueller report, and none of it will likely matter for 2020 Elijah Cummings: 'I am begging the American people to pay attention to what's going on' Angus King: 'Mueller passed the obstruction question to the Congress and Barr intercepted the pass' MORE (D-Calif.) as "tired old Nancy Pelosi" in a new campaign ad for Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsThe Hill's Morning Report — Mueller aftermath: What will House Dems do now? Mueller report poses new test for Dems Washington in frenzy over release of Mueller report MORE (R-N.C.).

"If you don't vote, the Democrats will take control of Congress and tired old Nancy Pelosi will take the gavel in the House of Representatives, where she'll try to impeach my father and Justice Kavanaugh and enact her radical, socialist agenda of government-run health care, high taxes and gun bans," Trump says in the radio ad, as reported in Politico Playbook on Sunday.

Pelosi is a frequent target for Republicans, who have made her a boogeywoman in the Democratic agenda.

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Politico reported that the president's son is working overtime to rally voters for House GOP.

Trump Jr. will go to 6 rallies on Monday alone, to push Republicans to get out and vote in battleground races. 

In the week running up to the midterms, Trump Jr. campaigned in Nevada for Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerTrump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds MORE, gubernatorial nominee Adam Laxalt, and House candidates in Nevada.

Trump Jr. urged voters in Arizona to fight for Rep. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyTrump gives nod to vulnerable GOP Sen. McSally with bill signing Embattled senators fill coffers ahead of 2020 Gallego tapped as national campaign chairman for Swalwell presidential bid MORE (R) in her hotly contested Senate race against Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D).

He also went to North Dakota to advocate for Rep. Kevin CramerKevin John CramerCain says he 'won't run away from criticism' in push for Fed seat Cain says he won't back down, wants to be nominated to Fed Conservatives urge Trump to stick with Moore for Fed MORE in his race for Sen. Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampPro-trade groups enlist another ex-Dem lawmaker to push for Trump's NAFTA replacement Pro-trade group targets 4 lawmakers in push for new NAFTA Biden office highlights support from women after second accuser comes forward MORE's (D) seat.

Most forecasters and polls predict that the GOP will hold its majority in the Senate and lose its hold on the House in Tuesday's midterm elections.

FiveThirtyEight gives Republicans a 5 in 6 shot at keeping the Senate and a 1 in 7 chance of holding the House.

However, as FiveThirtyEight's Nate Silver noted, the Republicans could still cling onto the House.

"The range of outcomes in the House is really wide," Silver told ABC's "This Week."

"No one should be surprised if [Democrats] only win 19 seats and no one should be surprised if they win 51 seats," Silver said, noting that Democrats have to take 23 seats in the House to gain a majority.

"Those are both extremely possible, based on how accurate polls are in the real world."