Voters in South Carolina say voting machines changed their choices

Officials in Richland County, S.C., are looking into reports by voters that their voting machines were selecting the opposite candidates they chose.

A local CBS station reported Tuesday morning that some voters have complained they’ve noticed votes for several races, including the state’s governor's race, being registered for a party they did not want to select while reviewing the confirmation page before submitting their ballots.

One voter told the station she attempted to correct her vote several times before a poll worker had to move her to another machine.

ADVERTISEMENT

Richland County Elections Director Rokey Suleman told the news station that he believes the voting malfunctions were caused by a calibration issue with the machines.

He told the news station that officials are now working to recalibrate the machines and also noted that it is typical for recalibrations as much as three times on Election Day. 

However, officials told the news station the site is also experiencing other malfunctions with cords and nonfunctioning outlets as the polling site deals with a higher than normal voter turnout for the midterms.

The report comes a week after some voters in Texas reported experiencing similar issues with voting machines that were erroneously selecting Sen. Ted Cruz (R) as their candidate of choice instead of Rep. Beto O'RourkeRobert (Beto) Francis O'RourkeBiden, Sanders lead field in Iowa poll Pollster says likely Dem 2020 nominee has not emerged in national conversation yet O'Rourke doubles support in CNN poll of Dem presidential race MORE or selecting no candidate at all instead of Cruz.

Polls across the country opened on Election Day with many waiting in anticipation to see whether a blue wave for Democrats will emerge in the first national elections since President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden, Sanders lead field in Iowa poll The Memo: Cohen fans flames around Trump Memo Comey used to brief Trump on dossier released: report MORE took office.

Recent polls have projected that Democrats will win control of the House during Tuesday's midterm elections, while Republicans are expected maintain their majority in the Senate.