More Latinos will serve in Congress than ever before

More Latinos will serve in Congress than ever before
© Greg Nash

A record 42 Latinos are set to serve in Congress next year following Tuesday's midterm elections, the most representation ever reached by the demographic on Capitol Hill, according to an Associated Press analysis

Thirty-three Latino Democratic candidates and seven Republican candidates won their races this week, with only one race remaining undecided as of Thursday evening. Democratic House candidate Gil Cisneros is still trailing Republican Young Kim in Orange County, California.

ADVERTISEMENT

Florida Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioHillicon Valley: Trump takes flak for not joining anti-extremism pact | Phone carriers largely end sharing of location data | Huawei pushes back on ban | Florida lawmakers demand to learn counties hacked by Russians | Feds bust 0M cybercrime group Huawei says inclusion on US trade blacklist is in 'no one's interest' Frustrated GOP senators want answers from Trump on Iran MORE (R) and Nevada Sen. Catherine Cortez MastoCatherine Marie Cortez MastoThis week: Barr back in hot seat over Mueller report Schumer, author discussed possible Kansas Senate run: report Life in the minority at the FCC MORE (D), both Latino lawmakers, were not up for reelection on Tuesday. 

Around 64 percent of Latinos voted for Democratic congressional candidates while 33 percent voted for Republicans, the AP reported. Young Latinos were more likely to vote for Democrats, the outlet noted.

Latino women were more likely to vote for Democrats than Latino men, 68 percent to 59 percent. Younger Latinos leaned more Democratic than their older counterparts, with 68 percent of those under age 45 voting for Democrats compared with 59 percent of those age 45 and over.

The AP Votecast surveyed 116,792 voters between Oct. 31 to Nov. 6, with a margin error of plus or minus 0.5 percentage points. 

Hispanic legislative representation has continued to grow over the past 40 years but is not proportional to the U.S. Hispanic population.