Sinema widens lead over McSally in Arizona Senate race

Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D) widened her lead over Rep. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyPoll shows McSally, Kelly tied in Arizona Senate race Mark Kelly's campaign raises over M in days after launching Senate bid Overnight Defense: House votes to end US support for Saudis in Yemen | Vote puts Trump in veto bind | Survey finds hazards in military housing | Senators offer new bill on Russia sanctions MORE (R) in the heated Arizona Senate race after a new round of ballots were tallied in the Democrat's favor late Friday. 

Sinema more than doubled her lead over McSally with Friday evening's latest tranche of results. The Democrat now leads her GOP challenger by 20,203 votes.

Earlier Friday, Sinema led McSally by just 9,163 votes out of nearly 2 million cast — a 0.48 percentage point lead. She now leads her opponent by just over 1 percentage point.

The vast majority of the votes tallied Friday came from Maricopa County, the state's largest county by population, where there were an estimated 345,000 uncounted votes prior to Friday's evenings results.

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Results from Maricopa were closely divided, with Sinema holding just a 2.5 percentage point lead over McSally on Thursday night.

Before Friday's release, Pima County had the next-largest chunk of uncounted ballots. The county, which houses the more left-leaning Tucson, had 80,000 uncounted ballots. Sinema led there by 13 percentage points as of Friday afternoon.

The largest pool of votes likely to favor McSally come from Pinal County, where an estimated 30,000 votes remain untallied. McSally on Friday led Sinema by 14 percentage points in the area.

Friday's wave of results came the same day a settlement was reached in a Phoenix courtroom that permits rural voters to have extra time to fix issues with their ballots, according to The Associated Press.

The settlement is a compromise in response to a Republican lawsuit that sought to stop urban voters from making those changes on the ballots.

Republicans alleged that some county recorders weren’t using a uniform procedure to make changes to mail-in ballots, specifically claiming that Maricopa and Pima counties improperly gave up to five days after Tuesday's election to make those changes.

Counties will now have a deadline of Nov. 14 to make those fixes to problematic mail-in ballots.

— Lisa Hagen and Reid Wilson contributed reporting.