Former Army paratrooper and congressional candidate Richard Ojeda files papers to run for president

Richard Ojeda (D), a West Virginia state senator and former Army paratrooper who led the state's teachers' strike earlier this year, plans to run for president in 2020.

Ojeda released his first campaign ad overnight, and intends to make a formal announcement on Monday afternoon. Politico reported he has filed paperwork for a presidential campaign with the Federal Election Commission.

The Democrat ran for Congress in the midterms, but lost his bid to represent West Virginia's 3rd Congressional District to Republican Carol Miller. Ojeda was defeated by 12 percentage points in a district President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump's top adviser on Asia to serve as deputy national security adviser United Auto Workers strike against GM poised to head into eighth day Trump doubles down on call to investigate Biden after whistleblower complaint: 'That's the real story' MORE carried by 49 percentage points in 2016.

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Politico reported that he told supporters in an email on Sunday night that he believes his campaign can translate to the national stage.

"Families in Logan, West Virginia, were going through the same struggles as families in the Bronx, San Francisco and Houston," he wrote. "This was not a West Virginia problem. This is an American problem and it has to change."

Ojeda was one of the most prominent lawmakers during a statewide teachers' strike that kept public schools closed for more than a week. Teachers boycotted work over low wages and skyrocketing health insurance costs.

The West Virginia Democrat is likely to be one of many party members declaring a presidential bid in the coming months. Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellMarkey fundraises ahead of Kennedy primary challenge The Hill's Campaign Report: De Blasio drops out | Warren gains support from black voters | Sanders retools campaign team | Warning signs for Tillis in NC Swalwell to DNI: 'You do not have to be a part of a lawless administration' MORE (D-Calif.) is said to be running in 2020, and numerous high-profile figures like Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenUnited Auto Workers strike against GM poised to head into eighth day Omar: Biden not the candidate to 'tackle a lot of the systematic challenges that we have' Seven takeaways from a busy Democratic presidential campaign weekend in Iowa MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSeven takeaways from a busy Democratic presidential campaign weekend in Iowa Fracking ban could have unintended consequence of boosting coal Poll: Voters back Medicare expansion, keeping private insurance MORE (D-Calif.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersOmar: Biden not the candidate to 'tackle a lot of the systematic challenges that we have' Seven takeaways from a busy Democratic presidential campaign weekend in Iowa Democrats go all out to court young voters for 2020 MORE (I-Vt.) and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenUnited Auto Workers strike against GM poised to head into eighth day Trump doubles down on call to investigate Biden after whistleblower complaint: 'That's the real story' Omar: Biden not the candidate to 'tackle a lot of the systematic challenges that we have' MORE are viewed as possible candidates.